Ministers' Deputies
    CM Documents

    CM(2004)213 3 December 2004
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    910 Meeting, 6 January 2005
    8 Youth and sport


    8.1 10th Conference of European Ministers responsible for Sport (Budapest, 14-15 October 2004)

    Secretary General's Report
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    Table of Contents

    Part I: Report of the Secretary General 2

    Introduction 2
    Good governance in sport 3
    The new draft international instrument against doping in sport 4
    The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) 4
    European sports cooperation 5
    Exhibition on Sport, Tolerance and Fair Play 6

    Part II: Opening speeches 6

    Speech by Maud de Boer-Buquicchio,
    Deputy Secretary General of the Council of Europe 6

    Speech of Ambassador Torbjörn Frøysnes,
    Chair of the Committee of Ministers at Deputies' level 8

    Speech by Mrs Kinga Göncz, Minister for Children, Youth and Sport of Hungary 10

    Appendix 1 : resolutions 12

    Resolution I: Principles of good governance in sport 12

    Resolution II on
    a. Progress within UNESCO on preparing a new international instrument against doping in sport
    b. Questions related to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) 13

    Resolution III on European sports cooperation during the period 2004-2008 14

    Appendix 2: Agenda 16
    Appendix 3: List of participants 18
    Appendix 4: List of speakers 24
    Appendix 5: Press release 26

    Part I: Report of the Secretary General

    Introduction

    1. The 10th Conference of European Ministers Responsible for Sport was held in Budapest on
    14-15 October 2004, at the invitation of the government of Hungary.

    2. The main themes of the Conference were “Good Governance in Sport” and “European Sport Cooperation”. The Bureau of the CDDS prepared the themes for the Conference and a meeting of senior officials was held on the afternoon of 13 October to review the texts of the draft resolutions. The texts adopted are to be found in Appendix 1. The agenda, list of participants, list of speakers and press release appear in the Appendices of this report.

    3. One hundred and forty delegates, including eleven Ministers and sixteen Vice-Ministers attended the Conference. Also present were the Chair of the Committee of Ministers' Deputies of the Council of Europe, the European Commission, the UNESCO, the World Anti-Doping Agency, the Chair of the CDDS and of the Monitoring Group of the Anti-Doping Convention, the International Olympic Committee, as well as non governmental bodies who had been invited as observers.

    4. The Conference was opened by Mrs Maud DE BOER-BUQUICCHIO, the Deputy Secretary General, who congratulated the former Hungarian Minister for Children, Youth and Sport, Mr Ferenc GYURCSÁNY, who had become the Prime Minister of Hungary. She wished to underline that sport was not on the “side lines” in the Council of Europe, but at the very centre of the organisation's interest because of the positive values which it gave to society. However, sport is under the spotlight of public scrutiny as ever before, facing the challenges of doping scandals, and allegations of corruption. The Deputy Secretary General emphasised that sport can make a powerful contribution to the democratic development of European society when it is governed properly. The Deputy Secretary General mentioned that there was no single model for good governance, only common principles that underlie the concept in general. These common principles include democratic structures based on clear electoral procedures open to membership, professional organisation and management, and procedures for dealing with conflicts of interest, with appropriate codes of ethics at all levels. The Deputy Secretary General stressed the importance of anti-doping questions. She welcomed a new draft UNESCO instrument and WADA's efforts in combating doping on a worldwide basis. With respect to a new draft international instrument, she emphasised the importance of co-existence of the Council of Europe and UNESCO instruments and raised concerns on finding effective monitoring system for the new draft international instrument.

    5. The Chair of the Ministers' Deputies of the Council of Europe, Ambassador Torbjørn FRØYSNES, addressed participants of the Ministerial Conference. In his speech, the Ambassador pointed out that sports events serve as an inspiration to encourage people to be active themselves. He underlined the strength of the Budapest conference in bringing together governments and civil society. The Council of Europe has always recognised that it is only through ensuring the effectiveness of this partnership that the true contribution of sport to society can be achieved.

    6. The interim Minister for Children, Youth and Sport of Hungary, Ms. Kinga GÖNCZ, welcomed the participants to Budapest. She recognised that the issue of good governance in sport was of increasing importance in the modern world. Furthermore, she acknowledged that thanks to the Council of Europe programmes (SPRINT programme in particular) the autonomy of sport had improved dramatically. Minister GÖNCZ mentioned the recent Olympic Games in Athens and the doping problems of Hungarian athletes. In this respect, she informed the conference that Hungary was planning on close cooperation with the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in order to elaborate a stricter doping control scheme for the future. With respect to future European sports cooperation, Minister GÖNCZ welcomed the adoption of the draft EU Constitutional Treaty and Article III-282 of the Constitution covering education, youth, sport and vocational training. She recognised that it was important that the Council of Europe continues its work in the field of sport and particularly mentioned the Ballons Rouges project.

    7. Mr Attila ÁBRAHÁM, Secretary of State, National Sports Office of the Prime Minister's Office, was elected as the Chair. Ms Bent Oksnes GIJERLOW, State Secretary, Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs of Norway, and Mr Richard CABORN, Minister for Sport of the United Kingdom, were elected as Vice Chairs of the Budapest Conference.

    8. In his introductory address, Mr Attila ÁBRAHÁM, sketched an outline of the main features of Hungarian sports governance. He praised the benefits of sport and said that it played an important role in the development of national consciousness and identity. Mr ÁBRAHÁM also touched on issues of doping and the recent Hungarian scandal at the Olympic Games in Athens and mentioned that the state policy on this issue was forward-looking.

    Over the one and a half day meeting, speakers from over fifty delegations and observers took the floor. The important points made on the themes are summarised in the following sections.

    Good Governance in Sport

    9. The importance of good governance in sport was emphasised by all delegations while underlining the specific features of sports governance in their respective countries. The following points were made:

    - the necessity of European cooperation on this question, which could be further developed through the Council of Europe.

    - the complexity of good governance in sport, which includes a network of policy measures and private regulations used to promote integrity in the management of the core values of sport such as democratic, ethical, efficient and accountable sports activities.

    - there is no single model of good governance in sport. However, there are some common elements that underlie good governance in general. These common elements include: recognising the need for an effective governance framework; the rights of stakeholders and key ownership functions; the role and the equitable treatment of stakeholders; democracy, accountability, disclosure and transparency; and finally, clearly defining the responsibilities of the governing body.

    - the importance of partnership is the core of the good governance. The challenge of sweeping social change requires taking a broad action involving stakeholders from public, private and voluntary sectors and pooling resources and innovations from all these sectors;

    - the definition of good governance encompasses partnerships and relevant decision-making bodies' work on the principles of fairness, objectivity, autonomy, consistency, and in sport, adherence to fair play in particular;

    - the importance of a strong voluntary member-based sports movement and creating conditions that help sport to thrive;

    - the need to give high priority to training in good governance of sports leaders – employees, professionals and volunteers; such training should be organised by sports organisations themselves;

    - the role of public funds in the area of sport for all while preserving effective regulations for ensuring autonomy, democracy and transparency, as well as specifying conditions of voluntary work in the NGOs active in the field of sport for all;

    - the tendency of the top sports to opt for effective corporate business-like governing scheme;

    - the necessity for governments to decide on national lottery and gambling policies. Keeping the proceeds from lottery and gambling is a significant source of income for sport in European countries.

    The new draft international instrument against doping in sport

    10. The progress made on drafting a new international instrument against doping in sport was the major observation of discussions on the topic of UNESCO. Many delegations expressed their belief that this new draft instrument will enable governments worldwide to become involved in the anti-doping work in accordance with commonly agreed principles based on the World Anti-Doping Code. The following points were made:

    - the fact that the new draft instrument was no longer based on the existing Council of Europe instruments was raised by several delegations, who feared having two sets of instruments with different terms of commitment;

    - the importance of preserving the freedom of states and governments to implement their own anti-doping policies, whether by means of legislation or through the national sports organisations;

    - European member states expressed their firm position on two important issues:

    a. the new UNESCO international instrument against doping and existing Council of Europe instruments should not impose conflicting obligations. Therefore, some provisions should be included in the new international instrument to ensure this principle;

    b. the need for an effective monitoring system was underlined during the Budapest conference. Furthermore, the integration of the Secretariat of the new draft instrument into its parent organisation was stressed.

    - the encouragement to countries to co-operate closely on the new draft international instrument against doping in sport at UNESCO MINEPS IV Conference in Athens (6-8 December 2004).

    The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA)

    11. The success of WADA was clearly emphasised by many delegates. The following points were made:

    - the importance of European inter-governmental cooperation for stronger European representation in WADA was stressed;

    - the importance of the fundamental partnership principle of WADA was discussed in the context of financing, the governing bodies and the implementation of decisions;

    - the question of preserving the partnership principle in alternating the Chair of WADA between the Olympic Movement and the public authorities was raised by the majority of delegations;

    - the Director General of WADA, Mr David HOWMAN, thanked European governments for their cooperation in paying in good time their contributions to WADA, and reminded delegations of the deadline of 6 November 2004 for the nomination of the Vice-Chair of WADA;

    - the proposal to put forward an agreed candidate for the Vice Chair of the WADA Foundation Board, and, in the meantime, to nominate Minister B. MIKKELSEN (Denmark) as a candidate for the position of interim Vice-Chair of the Foundation Board of WADA. For this reason, the outgoing troika Minister (Ireland, to be followed by Luxembourg and the Netherlands) have agreed to transfer the term of their membership of WADA Foundation Board to Minister B. MIKKELSEN.

    European sports cooperation

    12. The discussions mainly evolved around future sports cooperation between the Council of Europe and the European Union. Delegations welcomed the close ties already in existence between these two organisations and noted with satisfaction the adoption of the draft EU Constitution and in particular the Article III-282 of the Constitution covering education, culture and sport that sets the important framework for promoting sporting values and the education and social potential of sport, and specifically mentions cooperation with the Council of Europe.

    13. Among the points made during the debate were the following:

    - to include a point defining possible areas of partnership agreement between the European Union and the Council of Europe, such as:

    · establishing a co-ordinating body for negotiations and consultations between these two organisations and to consider a possible link to the CDDS and its Bureau activities;

    · defining areas for the partnership agreement in sport such as training for youth sports leaders, networking tools, information and publications and anti-doping policies;

    · initiation of integrated projects while involving international partners in the field of sport and youth or sport and socially disadvantaged groups;

    · developing action plans for CDDS SPRINT programme.

    - the discussions touched upon the Council of Europe's particular role in pan-European sports cooperation, which is linked to the core values of the Council of Europe (Human Rights, Parliamentary Democracy and the Rule of Law);

    - the future work in sport in the Council of Europe and the work of the CDDS in particular should emphasise the connection of core values of the Council of Europe and sport more strongly. Such activities as combating racism and xenophobia, gender discrimination, youth sport and also promoting equal opportunity for disabled persons should therefore be made priorities in the Council of Europe sport agenda;

    - satisfaction with the sport programmes such as SPRINT, the Ballons Rouges (Cyprus and Sweden announced voluntary contributions of € 20,000 and € 44,000 respectively to the Ballons Rouges project) and the success of the Crossroads project was underlined in many contributions during the Budapest conference;

    - the developing relationship with the EU resulting in joint activities and the optimising of resources delivers an ideal approach for pan-European cooperation in sport;

    - the European Ministers responsible for Sport strongly emphasised their support to continuation of the significant work done by the Council of Europe in the sports domain.

    Designations concerning WADA

    The Conference:

    14. designated Minister B. MIKKELSEN (Denmark) as a representative of the public authorities as a candidate for the position of interim Vice-Chair of the Foundation Board (and Executive Committee) of WADA;

    15. designated Minister J-F. LAMOUR (France) as the representative of the European continent on the Executive Committee of WADA.

    Adoption of resolutions

    16. The Delegates adopted Resolutions 1 to 3 as in Appendix 1.

    Invitations to future conferences

    17. The Russian Minister issued an invitation to hold the 17th Informal Meeting of Sports Ministers in Moscow in 2005-2006.

    Closing Session

    18. The Director of Youth and Sport of the Council of Europe, Mr René WEINGÄRTNER, mentioned the power of sport and underlined the positive role that sport plays in the society and especially the positive effect of sport in the development of youth. He congratulated Ministers MIKKELSEN and LAMOUR on their nominations. He thanked and congratulated the Hungarian authorities on behalf of the Council of Europe for the organisation of the Conference.

    19. Mr Attila ÁBRAHÁM, Secretary of State, National Sports Office of the Prime Minister's Office, emphasised the ethical values of sport, expressed Hungary's support to the new international instrument against doping in sport and praised the success of the Council of Europe and CDDS in particular in the domain of sport. He expressed the wish to co-operate with the Monitoring Group of Anti-Doping Convention to seek in an open and transparent way solutions to the recent doping scandals involving Hungarians.

    20. Mr Richard CABORN, the Vice Chair, in closing, thanked the delegations for their work and applauded the results of the Conference.

    Exhibition on Sport, Tolerance & Fair Play

    21. The report of this Conference would not be complete without mentioning that on the evening of 14 October 2004 the European Travelling Photo Exhibition on Sport, Tolerance & Fair Play was inaugurated in the presence of Conference delegates in the Vaulted Hall of the Hungarian Parliament, Budapest. The opening address was presented by the Deputy Speaker of the House, Mr László Mandur, who is also an ex-sportsman, and by Mr Ralf-René Weingärtner, Director of Youth & Sport of the Council of Europe. The two National Ambassadors for Sport, Tolerance & Fair Play of the Council of Europe who were at the origin of the idea for the exhibition, Mr Tapio Korjus (Finland) and Mrs Rosi Mittermaier-Neureuther, were present alongside Mr Jenö Kamuti, their Hungarian counterpart. Afterwards, the exhibition was on show at the gallery of the National Sports Museum with the exhibitions of the International Fair Play Committee and the Hungarian Sports Museum itself.

    Part II: Opening speeches

    Opening Speech by the Deputy Secretary General Mrs Maud De Boer-Buquicchio

    Ministers,
    Ladies and Gentlemen,

    Human spirit, this most precious possession of ours, reveals itself in many ways. Sport is just one form of its expression, but certainly the most dynamic. Only a few weeks ago, I witnessed the triumph of human spirit over physical disability at the Paralympic Games in Athens. I was moved beyond words to see thousands of athletes in wheelchairs, athletes with various physical ailments show the true spirit of perseverance in achieving their goal and their dream. This is what Sport is all about: inclusion, equality, motivation and accomplishment.

    The Paralympic Games reminded us once again that sport is not a guarded domain enjoyed by a select few; sport has value for everybody, and it can be a transforming experience indeed. Like Jesminder Bhamra, or Jess, the female character in the widely acclaimed movie 'Bend it like Beckham,' whose love of football enabled her to break free of social and cultural prejudices, sport offers its greatest heroes and heroines the means to attain improbable dreams.

    With the Olympic flame in Athens barely extinguished and the glorious images of this summer's major sport events still alive in our memories, we should remember what makes sporting activities a success. Both as a competition among athletes and as a public spectacle, a show of friendship and fair play, success in sport is the result of constant, day-to-day work, a joint effort by the sports movement, international organisations and national governments to make Sport a tool of unity and mutual respect, helping us build a Europe of peace and tolerance, a better place for more than 800 million Europeans.

    The star dust sprinkled by sport is not only confined to its practitioners. All of us here today know of at least one Sports minister, who, just a few days ago, became a Prime Minister. I congratulate the former Hungarian Minister of Children, Youth and Sport, Ferenc GYURCSÁNY, who has now taken up his duties as the Prime Minister of Hungary.

    The year 2004, the European Year of Education through Sport, has been an exciting year for sports fans on our continent and beyond, with the outstanding successes of the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Athens and the Euro 2004 football championship in Portugal. Let me add my congratulations to all those involved – and especially to the respective governments - for their efforts in organising these events.

    Ladies and gentlemen, I would like to stress that sport is not on the “side lines” in the Council of Europe, but at the very centre of our interest. With its natural values of respect, mutual understanding and fair play, sport is an excellent means to promote the goals of our pan-European organisation for the better future of our citizens.

    This conference's main mission is to chart the way towards good governance in Sport. Today Sport finds itself under the spotlight of public scrutiny as never before, facing the challenges of doping scandals, spectator violence and corruption. The need for better governance in sport has never been more urgent. The way in which sport is governed matters a great deal because maladministration and the decline of ethical standards erode public confidence at a time when there is increased understanding of Sport as a public good. Sport can make a powerful contribution to the democratic development of the European society, when it is governed properly.

    The Council of Europe has taken a lead in fostering close co-operation between the state and non-governmental sports organisations for better governance. Government action in the field of sport should always remain complementary to the activities of the independent sports movement – a principle which is enshrined in the European Sports Charter.

    However, there is no single model for good governance, only common principles of democratic participation, transparency and accountability that underlie the concept in general. To make better governance work, we need clear electoral procedures open to the membership, professional organisation and management, and procedures for dealing with conflicts of interest, with appropriate codes of ethics at all levels.

    Ladies and gentlemen,

    Doping remains one of the main scourges in sport today as it flies in the face of the principle of fair play while at the same time posing a great health risk to athletes. Recent doping scandals, still alive in our memories, must have surely convinced all of us of the need for urgent action. Doping means cheating – this is the message we must get across to coaches and athletes; it undermines not only the athlete's health but also public trust in the fairness of competition. In fact, more often than not it brings about the result opposite to the desired – the defeat, not the victory.

    I cannot stress enough the importance that the Council of Europe attaches to anti-doping questions. The Council of Europe Anti-Doping Convention, which entered into force in 1989, together with its additional Protocol, remains today the only international legal instrument dealing with this issue.

    Since its creation in November 1999 the World Anti-Doping Agency has successfully engaged in combating doping on a worldwide basis. The adoption and entry into force in the sports world of the World Anti-Doping Code has marked a quantum leap in harmonising international standards in this fight. Naturally, WADA's first efforts were focused especially on the needs of the international sports movement. Now it is time for the needs of the public authorities to be given equal consideration: under the Copenhagen declaration, and soon doubtless under the new UNESCO convention, the public authorities will also have obligations and duties.

    The twofold nature of WADA should be reflected also in WADA's governance. This conference should designate a European representative for the WADA Executive Committee and suggest a strategy for a public authority representative to assume a high-level position on the WADA Foundation Board.

    I welcome the near-completion of a new draft international instrument against doping in sport. This new UNESCO convention will solve the question of recognition of the World Anti-Doping Code and WADA, and might, for many states, become the legal basis for their participation in the fight against doping. Ever since this new convention was first discussed, the Council of Europe has been working with UNESCO to aid its progress. However, there are still some uncertainties with respect to several points of this draft.

    Co-existence of the two instruments is important to us, which means that States parties to the Council of Europe Convention will need to make sure that the UNESCO text does not conflict with their existing rights and duties. A solution also needs to be found for an effective monitoring system, which is linked with the need for an effective secretariat. This Conference may play a role in the co-ordination of the public authorities within WADA and will be able to do so only with a high degree of independence toward WADA.

    Ladies and gentlemen, I am sure that your deliberations will provide important guidelines on the future sport work programme and its place in the future agenda of the organisation beyond the 3rd Summit of Council of Europe Heads of States and Governments, to be held in Poland in May 2005. Of course, there should be proper coordination within governments to ensure adequate financing of this work programme.

    This conference will confront some of the very serious questions which sport provokes. Like Jess in “Bend it like Beckham”, we must find innovative answers, breaking free of old constraints. We must prove that sport of fair play, sport free of doping and corruption, sport enjoyed by all can be a reality. The answers you will find to these questions, ladies and gentlemen, will help preserve the joy and magic of sport.

    Whether it be a swimmer breaking a record, a rugby winger sprinting to a Try or a runner breasting the tape first, sport, like the Olympic flame that lit up Athens last summer during the Olympic and Paralympic Games, burns brightly in the lives of millions of Europeans.

    Thank you.

    Address by the Ambassador Torbjörn Frøysnes, Chairman of the Committee of Ministers at Deputies' Level

    Distinguished Ministers,
    Ladies and Gentlemen,

    I should like first to pay tribute to the Hungarian Government for hosting this Conference. As the Deputy Secretary General has just pointed out, the Head of your Government has a special interest in sport and your readiness, Madam Chair, to welcome us all here is also the reflection of a strong sporting tradition which has given the world many heroes.

    Let me also express my agreement with all that was said by Mrs De Boer-Buquicchio about the importance of the high values that sport embodies and its capacity to influence the public.

    Indeed, the many international championships that take place in all sports disciplines now form part of the global cultural reality.

    As a representative of a country which, some years ago, hosted such a major event, the Winter Olympic Games in Lillehammer, I can fully appreciate the satisfaction that the peoples of Portugal and Greece must be feeling now, and I seize this opportunity to congratulate them both. It is true that sport is capable of bringing out the best. It is capable of contributing to building good citizens and more enlightened societies.

    But before we get too carried away with mens sana in corpore sano, ladies and gentlemen, we should not forget other aspects of the realities. In many societies, illnesses associated with unhealthy lifestyles and insufficient exercise are seen as the major threats to public health. Sport events can and should serve as an inspiration to encourage people to be active themselves. And indeed, in many countries activity campaigns for the broad public are launched in connection with big events, which then can serve as a wake-up call for the passive majorities.

    My greatest sympathy, however, goes to the hundreds of thousands of volunteers in the sporting sector of European civil society who, week after week, devote their time and energy to training and organising our young ones, to nurturing the sports culture which we all consider so important and such a force for good.

    One of the great strengths of this conference is the way it brings together governments and civil society. The Council of Europe has always recognised that it is only through ensuring the effectiveness of this partnership that the true contribution of sport to society can be realised.

    I come from a country and a region where this partnership has been institutionalised, through the national Olympic committee and Confederation of Sport, as the operating principle working with the central and local governmental framework to maximise the human potential. There are many other ways of achieving the same objective, but your debate on “Good governance in sport” is of absolutely crucial importance if all the virtues of sport are to remain credible.

    Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen,

    The preamble to the 1992 European Sports Charter says that public authorities should develop reciprocal co-operation with the sports movement as the essential basis of sport, in order to promote the values and benefits of sport, and that in many European states, governmental action in sport is taken in order to be complementary to and support the work of this movement.

    Mr. Chairman,

    One of the main priorities of the Norwegian chairmanship of the Council of Europe is to promote our organisation's role to improve dialogue and understanding between cultures and societies. We think that sport in itself, and sports co-operation, make absolutely essential contributions to dialogue and understanding in our time. It is all the more essential and necessary that the basic principles of good governance and the fundamental values of this organisation like democracy, respect for human rights and the rule of law, values like accountability and transparency, fairness and solidarity, are fully applied in sport and sport co-operation. There are many role models in sport. Let the values that we share as members of the Council of Europe serve as a role model for the world of sport.

    The Council of Europe is the forum in which we must build from the ground up and from the top down to ensure that the sporting ideals with which we are so familiar are solid and not hollow and that all the expected benefits to public health may become a reality.

    If I may be permitted to add an “expected outcome” to your programme, Mr Chairman, that is it. On behalf of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, I wish this conference every success.

    Thank you for your attention.

    Address by Mrs Kinga GÖNCZ, the Minister for Children, Youth and Sport of Hungary

    Deputy Secretary General,
    Ministers, Mr. President,
    State Secretaries,
    Ladies and Gentlemen,
    Dear Colleagues,

    On behalf of the hosting country, the Republic of Hungary, may I extend a cordial welcome to you here in Budapest at the 10th Conference of European Ministers Responsible for Sport.

    It is of special importance to us that ministers responsible for sport of already 48 European states have gathered here in Budapest once again because I think that one of the wonderful missions of the Council of Europe is to act as a bridge among the different parts of Europe.

    We are proud that Hungary, ever since it became a member has been active in the three committees of the Council of Europe related to sport: in the CDDS, and in the committees on the implementation of two Conventions, one on spectator violence and the other on the fight against doping. It is a special pleasure for us that the opportunity recently opened up for Hungary to transfer from the beneficial side to contributory side: our experts can now extend professional assistance in Kosovo in a Council of Europe legal consultation on sport.

    Now we can receive the sport ministers of all the European countries, within or outside the European Union, as a Member State of the EU. The host, Hungary, as a new EU Member State that has just “shifted” from one side to another, can promote the efforts of the Council of Europe very well to preserve the unity of Europe and to develop its values.

    I would like to add just a few thoughts to the three key topics of the Conference, to good governance in sport, combating doping and finally to the future of sport co-operation in Europe, before I hand over to the future President of the newly established National Sport Office, who will talk to you in detail on the professional position of the Hungarian government on these sports issues.

    The key topic of our Conference is ”Good governance in sport in Europe”.

    The concept of the Council of Europe is, just as it is spelled out in the European Sports Charter, that sport is basically a social, that is, civil activity. Based on democratic traditions, sports organisations, just as any other NGOs are led and managed by their own, elected bodies, based on rules democratically adopted by the members. The state has its own sports policy prevailing through indirect means, not by exercising direct control.

    In Central and Eastern European countries, among them Hungary, a strong centralised control used to be typical in the decades following World War II. Thanks partially to the Council of Europe training and information programmes, such as the SPRINT programme announced right here in Budapest in 1991, and partially due to the comprehensive social changes after the transformation of the country, the autonomy of the NGOs increased significantly.

    The President will tell you about the basic elements and the major objectives of the new Hungarian sports strategy that is just being developed.

    The second issue today is anti-doping activities. Hungary takes active part in the international fight against doping, we have incorporated the recommendations of international and European organisations into our anti-doping policy, and Hungarian anti-doping activities comply with WADA and IOC requirements.

    Hungarian athletes performed wonderfully at the Summer Olympic Games in Athens. However, the sport-loving Hungarian public was deeply shocked by the Hungarian doping cases at the Olympics. After having suffered the consequences, we would like now to look ahead into the future, and while we continue with stricter than ever doping controls, we feel that one of our primary jobs is to also continue with education and information activities. We remain open to all international co-operations for the sake of clean sport. The President will tell you about our cooperation with WADA, about our anti-doping policy, but, I would also like to state here clearly that the Hungarian government is fully committed to clean sports and to the fight against doping.

    Finally may I say a few words on European co-operation in sport.

    The Council of Europe will not remain untouched by the enlarged European Union of 25 Member States, which still just barely adds up to more than half of its Members. And even though the EU Constitutional Treaty mentions sport as a social and educational element, the emphasis on sport is still well under expectations. With all probability, co-operation between the EU and the Council of Europe in the area of sport will increase in the future, just as Article III-282 stipulates. Until the EU Constitutional Treaty enters into force, certainly the Council of Europe remains the major scene for sports co-operation, and even subsequent to that it will remain a primary professional and political consultation forum.

    This is why it is important when the Council of Europe draws up its general cooperation priorities and its budget, to allow sport to take its deserved place. I feel that the work done by the Council of Europe in the area of sport is of great value. The successful projects carrying positive messages such as the international sports camps for children in disaster-struck areas, which are especially suitable to make Council of Europe values known and not only in the narrow field of sports.

    Ladies and Gentlemen,

    After these introductory thoughts I would like you to welcome the future President of the National Sport Office, Mr Attila Ábrahám. My colleague was Olympic champion at the Seoul Olympic Games and is a five-time world champion in kayaking. He will be an important personality in Hungarian sports governance in the future.

    Thank you for your attention.

    Appendix 1

    Resolution I on the Principles of Good Governance in Sport

    The European Ministers responsible for Sport, meeting in Budapest for their 10th Conference from
    4 to 15 October 2004:

    Convinced that the need existed to identify the underlying principles, which should be incorporated into a comprehensive policy for sport and good governance;

    Conscious of the substantial work done previously by the Committee for the Development of Sport in developing policies designed to promote the principles of good governance in sport;

    Welcoming the publication of the study by A-N Chaker on Good Governance in Sport, a European Survey;

    Considering that non-governmental sports organisations are an essential basis for the development and continued survival of democratic sport, and also make a unique contribution to the realisation of societies based on the rule of law, pluralist democracy and respect for human rights – which are the guiding principles of the Council of Europe;

    Recalling that “The Fundamental Principles on the Status of Non-Governmental Organisations in Europe” of 13 November 2002 provide a sound basis for governing the status of non- governmental organisations in Europe;

    Bearing in mind the European Non Governmental Sports Organisation's (ENGSO) recommendation on transparency and credibility in sports organisations;

    Reaffirming their commitment to the principles of good governance in sport, and agreeing that the implementation of these principles such as democracy, accountability, fairness, solidarity and transparency are keys to widening popularity of sport and strengthening the position of sports NGOs in civil society;

    Bearing in mind the opinion of the Council of Europe Group of States against Corruption (GRECO) on corruption in sport;

    Also recalling the Final Declaration of the Second Summit of Heads of State and Government of the Council of Europe (Strasbourg, 10-11 October 1997) which expresses the standard setting role of the Council of Europe, in particular, to seek common responses to the challenges posed by the growth in corruption;

    Stressing their belief that the consistent application of the principles of good governance in sport would be a significant factor in helping to eradicate corruption in sport;

    Resolve to:

    Encourage all institutions, non-governmental organisations and other groups concerned in sport to devise, implement, strengthen and support initiatives based on the principles of good governance in sport, which include as minimum:

    - Democratic structures based on clear electoral procedures open to the membership;
    - Professional organisation and management, with an appropriate code of ethics and procedures for dealing with conflicts of interest;
    - Accountability and transparency in decision making and financial operations;
    - Fairness in dealing with the membership and solidarity;
    - A basis for setting an equitable partnership between the public authorities and the sports movement.

    Ensure that these principles of good governance are integrated into sports policies and practices at national level and to ensure that they are effectively monitored;

    Convinced that the successful implementation by sports NGOs of effective good governance policies in their organisations would help to strengthen their self governance and autonomy in matters concerning sport and would further strengthen their position in relation to public authorities based on mutual respect and trust;

    Invite all sectors – non-governmental sports organisations, civil society groups and voluntary institutions – to co-operate closely with the national authorities in order to achieve and implement the principles of this Resolution;

    Stress the benefits which good governance in sport can provide in promoting fair play, sport for all and its key role in preventing corruption;

    Reaffirm that the nature of sport itself, based on fair play and equal competition, requires that all unethical practices and behaviours in sport should be forcefully and effectively countered;

    Invite the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe to ask member states to address this problem at national level and to take concrete steps to reduce the possibilities of malpractices in sport.

    Note that proceeds from lottery and gambling are a significant source of income for sport in most European countries, and underline the right of governments to decide national lottery and gambling policies.

    Resolution II on
    a) A progress within UNESCO on preparing a new international instrument against doping in sport;
    b) Questions related to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA)

    The European Ministers responsible for Sport, meeting in Budapest for their 10th Conference on 14 and 15 October 2004:

    With regard to UNESCO:

    Reaffirming their desire to realise quickly the important political commitments they have accepted by signing the Copenhagen Declaration on Anti-doping in Sport;

    Thanking the Council of Europe for its essential contribution to helping governments to meet these commitments and other objectives in the fight against doping;

    Noting with satisfaction the progress made by governments and sport organisations in anti-doping to date, in particular in relation to the recognition, governance and funding of the World Anti-Doping Agency, the acceptance of the World Anti-Doping Code, the development and implementation of the Council of Europe Anti-Doping Convention (ETS 135) and its Additional Protocol (ETS 188) and other intergovernmental co-operation on anti-doping;

    Recognising the progress made within UNESCO on drafting a new international instrument against doping in sport and that this should enable many more governments worldwide to become involved in the anti-doping work in accordance with commonly agreed principles based on the World Anti-Doping Code;

    Considering that the new international instrument against doping in sport should incorporate an effective monitoring system;

    Stressing that the new international instrument should be in place before the Turin Winter Olympic Games in February 2006;

    With regard to WADA:

    Expressing their satisfaction with the way the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has developed since its creation in late 1999;

    Stressing the importance, in accordance with the partnership nature of WADA, of striking a balance between the representatives of public authorities and those of the Olympic Movement in positions of leadership within WADA;

    Resolve:

    1.1 To co-operate closely on the new draft international instrument against doping in sport at UNESCO MINEPS IV Conference in Athens (6-8 December);

    1.2 To seek to ensure that the standards under the new draft international instrument conform to the purposes of the World Anti-Doping Code;

    1.3 To seek to ensure that the commitments under the new draft international instrument are as close as possible to the commitments made in the existing instruments, in order to promote compatibility between the two sets of instruments and to honour the existing commitments;

    1.4 To ensure that the Secretariat of the new draft instrument will be integrated in its parent organisation;

    1.5 To support the implementation of an integrated solution for the monitoring of the commitments under the existing instruments and the future instrument;

    1.6 To stress in this context the importance of good co-operation between the Council of Europe and UNESCO;

    1.7 To clarify the relationship between the draft instrument and its annexes and the World Anti-Doping Code and its International Standards.

    2. To seek, in consultation and co-operation with other regions, to develop a policy for identifying the requirements that would enable the public authorities to put forward, at the right time, an agreed candidate for the Chair of the WADA Foundation Board;

    Approve:

    1. The designation of Minister B. Mikkelsen (Denmark) being a representative of the public authorities as a candidate for the position of interim Vice-Chair of the Foundation Board (and Executive Committee) of WADA;

    2. The designation of Minister J.F. Lamour (France) as the representative of the European continent on the Executive Committee of WADA.

    Take note of:

    The designation of Minister B. Mikkelsen (Denmark) as representative of the European continent on the Foundation Board of WADA up until the end of 2005.

    Resolution III on European Sports Cooperation during the period 2004-2008

    The European Ministers responsible for Sport, meeting in Budapest for their 10th Conference from
    14-15 October 2004:

    Bearing in mind that this conference takes place during the 50th anniversary of the European Cultural Convention, on the basis of which, and over many years, the Council of Europe has provided the platform for intergovernmental co-operation on questions related to sport;

    Recognising that this co-operation, covering the whole continent, has led to the adoption of key texts for national and international sports policies, including three treaties and the European Sports Charter, and numerous texts showing the contribution of sport to modern society;

    Agreeing that this “acquis” provides a sound basis for developing future sports co-operation programmes in the Council of Europe;

    Considering that the Third Summit of the Council of Europe would be a timely occasion to adopt such programmes;

    Noting with pleasure the recent enlargement of the European Union and the adoption of the draft constitutional Treaty and, in particular, Article III-282 covering education, youth, sport and vocational training, which sets the framework for promoting sporting values and the education and social potential of sport in co-operation with the Council of Europe;

    Reaffirming in this context the importance for the future of European sports co-operation of close ties between the European Union and the Council of Europe;

    Stressing the importance and significance of sport in modern society, notably from the political, social, cultural and economic perspectives;

    Welcoming the European Union and the Council of Europe's co-operation in the field of sport and, in particular, the “European Crossroads – Sport, Front Door to Democracy” - the project to mark the European Year of Education through Sport (EYES 2004);

    Recalling the Final Declaration of the Second Summit of Heads of State and Government of the Council of Europe (Strasbourg, 10-11 October 1997) which specifically welcomes the development of co-operation with other European organisations, and in particular the European Union;

    Stressing the importance of avoiding overlapping of activities between the work programmes of the European Union and the Council of Europe in the area of sport;

    Convinced that there is a need to identify possible new ways of co-operation between the two institutions in the field of sport.

    Resolve to:

    Ensure the promotion of complementary activities in the field of sport between the European Union and the Council of Europe;

    Consider that the Council of Europe's particular role in pan-European sports co-operation is linked to the core values of the Council of Europe (Human Rights, Parliamentary Democracy and the Rule of Law) and that future work in sport should bring out this connection more strongly; examples of such activities are combating racism, xenophobia, gender discrimination and also at promoting equal opportunity for disabled persons;

    Invite the European Union and the Council of Europe to develop where appropriate partnership agreements in the field of sport;

    Invite the Committee of Ministers in the context of the Third Summit and bearing in mind Article III-282 of the European Constitution, to ensure that the Council of Europe continues adequately to support and fund its work in sports questions, for the benefit of Europeans and of governments of member states in conformity with its own values and missions;

    Accept the kind offer of the government of the Russian Federation to organise the 17th Informal Meeting of Sports Ministers at Moscow, possibly in late 2005 or 2006, in the light of international sports developments.

    Appendix 2

    Agenda

    1. Opening session of the Ministerial Conference

    Opening of the Conference by Ms Maud De BOER-BUQUICCHIO, Deputy Secretary General of the Council of Europe

    Election of the Chair and Vice Chair

    Address by the Chair of the Ministers' Deputies of the Council of Europe, Ambassador Torbjørn FRØYSNES

    Adoption of the Agenda

    General Introduction by Ms Kinga GÖNCZ,
    Minister for Children, Youth and Sport of Hungary

    2. Presentation and discussion of Theme I and the sub-themes

    THEME I: GOOD GOVERNANCE IN SPORT

    Sub-themes for the ensuing discussions:

    1. The overall strategic environment for sport, and the role of governments: why “invest” in sport? New trends in sports practice.

    2. “Who Does What?” in sport at national level - how responsibility is divided between the state and NGOs; the role and responsibility of different organisations

    3. Ways to strengthen and protect the NGO sector, giving them authority and autonomy with accountability

    4. What is “the good balance” between the autonomy of Sport NGOs and supervision by governmental bodies of them?

    5. Financial aspects and trends in sport and preserving the unity of sport. The commercial sector. Consequences for sports associations.

    6. How to protect the integrity of sport?

    Expected outcomes:

    Agreement on some fundamental principles for sports governance and “models” of national sport structures.

    Contributions by Delegations on the themes (continued).

    Résumé by André-Noël Chaker, Consultant, Sport Department, Council of Europe

    3. Presentation of Theme II and the sub-themes

    THEME II: EUROPEAN SPORTS CO-OPERATION

    1. Items of current political concern, including:

    - Progress within UNESCO on drafting an international instrument against doping in sport;

    - Relations with the World Anti-Doping Agency and nomination of the European region representative to the WADA Executive Committee.

    2. Future work and priorities of the sports programme of the Council of Europe:

    - The consequences of EU enlargement and inclusion of an article on sport in the Constitution of the European Union on the work of the Council of Europe carried out by the CDDS.

    - European Sports cooperation in the period 2004/2008: who does what at pan-European level?

    Expected outcomes:

    Clear guidelines and political orientations for future European Sports Co-operation in the period 2004/2008: “who does what” at pan-European level?

    4. Adoption of the final texts (resolutions and/or others).

    5. Close of the Conference

    6. Press Conference.

    Appendix 3

    List of Participants

    ALBANIA / ALBANIE
    Mr. Edmond DRAGOTI, Deputy Minister of the Culture, Youth and Sports;
    Mrs Shpresa SULO, Responsible for the International Relations in Sport, Directorate of International Relations & Integration, Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sports

    ARMENIA / ARMENIE
    Mr Yeghish DAVTYAN, Head of section, State Committee of Physical Culture and Sports

    AUSTRIA / AUTRICHE
    Mag. Harald TREIBER, Head of Department for international affairs, Federal Chancellery;
    Dr. Karlheinz DEMEL, Österreichisches Anti-Doping Comité, (ÖADC)
    Mr Michael TRINKER, Austrian Sports Federation;
    Mr Ilan FELLMANN, Department of International Relations, Federal Chancellery

    AZERBAIJAN / AZERBAIDJAN
    Mr. Ilham MADATOV, Head of International Relations Department, Ministry of Youth, Sport and Tourism;
    Mr Eyvaz GURBANOV, Director of the National Olympic Committee;
    Mr Hasan HASANOV, Ambassador, Embassy of the Republic of Azerbaijan in Budapest

    BELARUS
    Ms Galina ZABURYANOVA, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Sports and Tourism;
    Mr Nikolai VOROBYEV, Assistant to the Minister, Ministry of Sports and Tourism

    BELGIUM / Belgique
    Communauté française
    M. René HAMAITE, Directeur de Cabinet adjoint du Ministre chargé des sports, Ministère de la Communauté française;
    M. Marcel Odon MARNEFFE, Directeur Général ff, Direction générale du sport, A.D.E.P.S., Ministère de la Communauté française;
    M. Didier HALLER, Ministère de la Communauté française

    BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA / BOSNIE-HERZEGOVINE
    Mr Emir MEDANHODŽIĆ, Secretary General, Sports Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    BULGARIA / BULGARIE
    Mr Vasil IVANOV-LUCIANO, Minister, Ministry of Sports and Youth, Council of Ministers;
    Mrs Mila ANDREEVA, Head of the International Department, Ministry for Sports and Youth, Council of Ministers;
    Mr Krasimir DIMITROV, Director, Public relations, Ministry for Sports and Youth

    CROATIA / CROATIE
    Ms Romana CAPUT-JOGUNICA, Assistant Minister for sports, Ministry of Science, Education and Sports;
    Mr. Željko KLARIĆ, Senior adviser for International Affairs, Ministry of Science, Education and Sports,

    CYPRUS / CHYPRE
    Dr Titos CHRISTOPHIDES, President, Cyprus Sport Organisation;
    Mr Costas PAPACOSTAS, Director General, Cyprus Sport Organisation;
    Mr George CHACALLI, Ambassador, Embassy of Cyprus in Budapest

    CZECH REPUBLIC / REPUBLIQUE TCHEQUE
    Mr Karel HRDY, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport of the Czech Republic;
    Dr Jan PŘEROVSKÝ, Department of Sport, Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport;
    Ms Hana FARKASOVA, Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport

    DENMARK / DANEMARK
    Mr Brian MIKKELSEN, Minister for Culture, Ministry of Cultural Affairs;
    Mr Hans Kristian KRISTENSEN, Private Secretary, Ministry of Culture;
    Mr Soren RIISKJAER, Sports Director, Ministry of Culture;
    Mr Peter NAVNTOFT, Head of Section, Ministry of Culture;
    Ms Anne Julie SCHMITT JENSEN, Special Adviser, Ministry of Culture

    ESTONIA / ESTONIE
    Mr Tōnu SEIL, Head of Sport Department, Ministry of Culture

    FINLAND / FINLANDE
    Ms Tanja KARPELA, Minister of Culture, Ministry of Education;
    Ms Sirpa HARTOJOKI, Political advisor to the Minister of Culture, Ministry of Education;
    Ms Raija MATTILA, Ministry of Education, Sports Division;
    Mrs Minna POLVINEN, Senior Advisor, Ministry of Education, Sports Division;
    Mr Tapio KORJUS, Manager of the Training Center, Kuortane Sport Institute;
    Mr Jukka PEKKALA, Secretary General, Finnish Sports Federation

    FRANCE
    M. Jean-François LAMOUR, Ministre de la Jeunesse, des Sports et de la Vie Associative, Ministère de la Jeunesse, des Sports et de la Vie Associative;
    M. Valéry GENNIGES, Conseiller pour les affaires européennes et internationales, Ministère de la Jeunesse, des Sports et de la Vie Associative ;
    M. Andrzej ROGULSKI, Chef du Bureau des Relations Internationales et des grands événements sportifs, Ministère de la Jeunesse, des Sports et de la Vie Associative;
    Mme Sophie CHAILLET, Chef du Bureau des Relations Internationales et des grands événements sportifs, Ministère de la Jeunesse, des Sports et de la Vie Associative;
    M. Gilles GABRIELI, Officier de sécurité du Ministre, Ministère de la Jeunesse, des Sports et de la Vie Associative;
    M. Philippe ZELLER, Ambassador of France, Embassy of France in Budapest;
    M. Jean-Marc GRAVIER, Consellor, Embassy of France in Budapest;
    M. Christophe PARISOT, Attaché, Embassy of France in Budapest

    GEORGIA / GEORGIE
    Dr Tamaz TEVZADZE, Deputy Minister, responsible for Sport, Ministry of Culture, Monument Protection and Sport

    GERMANY / ALLEMAGNE
    Ms Ute VOGT, Parliamentary Secretary, Federal Ministry of the Interior;
    Mr Peter GLASS, Ministerialrat, Bundesministerium des Innern;
    Mr Garry KLEY, Minister, Chair of the Permanent Conference of Sports Ministers of the German Landers;
    Dr Franz-Josef KEMPER, Ministerialdirigent, Ministerium des Innern und für Sport des Landes Rheinland-Pfalz;
    Mrs Erika DIENSTL, European representative, Deutscher Sportbund;
    Mrs Marlis RYDZY-GÖTZ, Head, International Relations Department, Deutscher Sportbund

    GREECE / GRECE
    Mr George ORFANOS, Under Secretary of Sports, General Secretariat for Sports;
    Mr George VLAZAKIS, Head of Intergovernmental Agreements, European Union and Council of Europe, General Secretariat for Sports;
    Mr Andreas MALATOS, Sport Expert, General Secretariat for Sports;
    Ms Elisabeth BONAS, Intergovernmental Agreements, European Union and Council of Europe, General Secretariat for Sports;
    Mr Dimitris CONTOUMAS, Ambassador, Embassy of Greece in Budapest

    HOLY SEE / SAINT-SIEGE
    H.E. Monsigner Juliusz JANUSZ, Apostolic Nunciature; REV.DO
    DR. László PERENDY, President of Association for Sport of Catholic Schools,
    Mr Clément SCHERTZINGER, Président d'Honneur de la FSCF, Président de la FICEP

    HUNGARY / HONGRIE
    Dr. Kinga GÖNCZ, Minister, Ministry of Children, Youth and Sports;
    Mr Attila MESTERHÁZY, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Children, Youth and Sports;
    Dr. Attila ÁBRAHÁM, Secretary of State, National Sports Office of the Prime Minister's Office;
    Mr András FÜLEKY, Deputy State Secretary for Sports, Ministry of Children, Youth and Sports;
    Dr. Róbert LUPÓCZ, Deputy Head of Private Law and Administrative Department, Ministry of Children, Youth and Sports;
    Ms Anna MOLNÁR, Head of Innovation and Organisation Unit, Deputy State Secretariat for Sports, Ministry of Children, Youth and Sports;
    Dr. György BAKANEK, Senior Advisor, Innovation and Organisation Unit, Deputy State Secretariat for Sports, Ministry of Children, Youth and Sports;
    Ms Krisztina GÖNTÉR, Senior Advisor, Department of EU and International Relations, Ministry of Children, Youth and Sports;
    Ms Zsuzsanna BUKTA, Advisor, Deputy State Secretariat for Sports, Ministry of Children, Youth and Sports;
    Ms Diána DÉRI, Advisor, Deputy State Secretariat for Sports, Ministry of Children, Youth and Sports;

    ICELAND / ISLANDE
    Mrs Thorgerdur Katrin GUNNARSDÓTTIR, Minister of Education, Science and Culture;
    Mr Steingrímur SIGURGEIRSSON, Advisor to the Minister, Ministry of Education, Science and Culture;
    Ms Liney Rut HALLDORSDOTTIR, Head of Division for Sport and Youth Affairs, Ministry of Education, Science and Culture

    IRELAND / IRLANDE
    Mr John O'DONOGHUE, Minister for Sport, Department of the Arts, Sport and Tourism;
    Ms Therese O'CONNOR, Private Secretary, Department of the Arts, Sport and Tourism;
    Mr Tony COTTER, Special Advisor, Department of the Arts, Sport and Tourism;
    Mr Con HAUGH, Assistant Secretary, Department of the Arts, Sport and Tourism

    ITALY / ITALIE
    Mr Mario PESCANTE, President of The European Olympic Committees;
    Mr Paulo Guido SPINELLI, Ambassador, Italian Embassy, Budapest;
    Mr Giuseppe PASTORELLI, Counsellor, Italian Embassy, Budapest;
    Mr Sergio STROZZI, First Secretary, Italian Embassy, Budapest;
    Ms Daniela BOTZANI, Italian Embassy, Budapest

    LATVIA / LETTONIE
    Mr Edgars VAIKULIS, Advisor to the Minister, Ministry of Education and Science;
    Mrs Iveta DUNDURE, European Project Coordinator, Latvian Sports Department, Ministry of Education and Science;
    Mr Juris GORKSS, Head Deputy of Sports Department, Ministry of Education and Science

    LIECHTENSTEIN
    Mr Alois OSPELT, Minister of Sport, Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein;
    Mr Josef EBERLE, President, Commission on Sports, Principality of Liechtenstein;
    Mr Johann PINGITZER, Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein

    LITHUANIA / LITUANIE
    Mr Vytas NĖNIUS, Director General, Department of Physical Education and Sports under the Government of the Republic of Lithuania;
    Mr Sigitas STASIULIS, Lithuanian State Department of Physical Education and Sports under the Government of the Republic of Lithuania;
    Ms Milda LAURUTENAITE, Head of Physical Education Strategy Division, Lithuanian State Department of Physical Education and Sports

    LUXEMBOURG
    M. Jean KRANTZ, Conseiller de Gouvernement, Département ministériel des Sports;
    Mme Karin SCHANK, Attachée d'administration, Département ministériel des Sports

    MALTA / MALTE
    Mr Franco AZZOPARDI, Chairman, Malta Sports Council;
    Mr Eucharistic CAMILLERI, Director, Malta Sports Council

    NETHERLANDS / PAYS-BAS
    Mrs Clémence ROSS-VAN DORP, State Secretary of Health, Welfare and Sport;
    Mr Rob de VRIES, Director of the Sports Department, Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport;
    Ms Dorien HÖPPENER, International Sport Affairs Officer, Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport;
    Mr Peter DE KLERK, Doping Affairs Officer, Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport;
    Ms Nicolette VAN VELDHOVEN, Netherlands Olympic Committee, Netherlands Sports Confederation;
    Ms Marije DIPPEL, Netherlands Olympic Committee, Netherlands Sports Confederation

    NORWAY / NORVEGE
    Ms Bent Oksnes GIJERLOW, State Secretary, Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs;
    Mr Oyvind Mehus SJURSEN, Adviser, Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs;
    Mr Per Kristian AASMUNDSTAD, Deputy Director General, Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs

    POLAND / POLOGNE
    Dr Adam GIERSZ, Under Secretary of State, Ministry of National Education and Sport;
    Dr Ewa SUSKA, Deputy Director, Department of International Relations, Ministry of National Education and Sport; Prof Ryszard GRUCZA, Director, Institute of Sport;
    Ms Joanna ZUKOWSKA-EASTON, Specialist, Ministry of National Education and Sport,

    PORTUGAL
    M. José Manuel CONSTANTINO, Président, Instituto Nacional do Desporto (IND);
    Mr Eduardo Borges PEREIRA, Vice-président, Instituto do Desporto de Portugal

    ROMANIA / ROUMANIE
    Mr Constantin DIACONU, President, National Agency for Sport;
    Mr Arthur HOFFMANN, Director General, National Agency for Sport;
    Mr Alexandru CALCIU, Expert, National Agency for Sport

    RUSSIAN FEDERATION / FEDERATION DE RUSSIE
    Mr Viacheslav FETISOV, Chairman, The State Committee of the Russian Federation for Physical culture and Sport;
    Mr Dmitry TUGARIN, Press Attaché, The State Committee of the Russian Federation for Physical culture and Sport

    SAN MARINO / SAINT-MARIN
    Mr Paride ANDREOLI, Minister for Sport, Ministry of Tourism and Sport;
    Mr Mauro MAIANI, Advisor to the Minister, Ministry of Tourism and Sport

    SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO / SERBIE ET MONTENEGRO
    Mr Aleksandar SOSTAR, Director of the Department of Sports, Ministry of Education and Sports ;
    Mr Srdjan BOŠKOVIĆ, Head of the Department of Sports, Ministry of Education and Sports

    SLOVAK REPUBLIC / REPUBLIQUE SLOVAQUE
    Mr László SZIGETI, Deputy Minister of Education responsible for Sport;
    Mr Zdenko KMETEK, Director of International Co-operation, Section of State Care on Sport, Ministry of Education;
    Mr Samuel ROŠKO, Director, Ministry of Education responsible for Sport

    SLOVENIE / SLOVENIE
    M. Zoran VEROVNIK, Undersecretary / International Affairs, Ministry of Education, Science and Sport, Sport Department;
    Mr Marko RAJSTER, Elite Sport, Ministry of Education, Science and Sport, Sport Department

    SPAIN / ESPAGNE
    M. Jaime LISSAVETZKY, Secretario de Estado, Presidente del Consejo Superior de Deportes;
    M. Manuel FONSECA, Director del Gabinete del Secretario de Estado para el Deporte,
    Consejo Superior de Deportes

    SWEDEN / SUEDE
    Mr Tomas JOHANSSON, Sport Director, Ministry of Justice;
    Mrs Mona MEIJER, International Secretary, Swedish Sports Confederation;
    Ms Katarina SUNDBERG, Special adviser, Ministry of Justice

    SWITZERLAND / SUISSE
    M. Heinz KELLER, Directeur, Office fédéral du sport, Département fédéral de la défense, de la protection, de la population et des sports;
    M. Marco BLATTER, Directeur, Swiss Olympic Association;
    M. Hans HÖHENER, Président, Commission fédérale du sport

    THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA” /
    L'EX REPUBLIQUE YOUGOSLAVE DE MACEDOINE”
    Mr Petar SILJANOVSKI, Deputy Director, Agency of Youth and Sport,
    Mr Nikola KOLEVSKI, Head of Sport sector, Agency of Youth and Sport

    UKRAINE
    Mr Mykola KOSTENKO, Chair of the State Committee on Physical Culture and Sports;
    Mr Vladimir GUSAKOV, State Committee on Physical Culture and Sports

    UNITED KINGDOM / ROYAUME-UNI
    Rt Hon Richard CABORN, Minister for Sport, Department for Culture, Media and Sport;
    Mr Graeme CORNELL, Private Secretary to the Minister, Ministry for Sport, Department for Culture, Media and Sport;
    Mr Marc CAVEY, Head of International Sport Policy, Department for Culture, Media and Sport;
    Mr Stephen HODGSON, Head of International Sport Policy, Department for Culture, Media and Sport

    COMMITTEE OF MINISTERS / COMITE DES MINISTRES
    Ambassador Torbjørn FRØYSNES, Chairman of the Ministers' Deputies, Council of Europe

    COMMITTEE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPORT (CDDS)
    COMITE POUR LE DEVELOPPEMENT DU SPORT (CDDS)
    Mr John SCOTT, UK Sport

    MONITORING GROUP OF THE ANTI-DOPING CONVENTION (T-DO)
    GROUPE DE SUIVI DE LA CONVENTION CONTRE LE DOPAGE (T-DO)
    Prof. Dr. R. Klaus MÜLLER, Institute of Doping Analysis

    EUROPEAN COMMISSION / COMMISSION EUROPEENNE
    Mr Pedro VELAZQUEZ HERNANDEZ, Directeur adjoint Sport, European Commission,

    OBSERVERS / OBSERVATEURS

    UNESCO
    Mr Wataru IWAMOTO, Director, UNESCO, Division of Secondary, Technical T and Vocational Education;
    Mr Kevin THOMPSON, Programme Specialist, UNESCO (ED/STV/PES) Unit for Physical Education and Sport Division of Secondary, Technical and Vocational Education

    WORLD ANTI-DOPING AGENCY (WADA) / AGENCE MONDIALE ANTIDOPAGE (AMA)
    Mr David HOWMAN, Director General;
    Dr Alain GARNIER, Directeur médical

    INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE (IOC) /
    COMITE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIQUE (CIO)
    M. Guy DRUT, International Olympic Committee Member in France and Chairman of the International Relations Commission

    INTERNATIONAL SPORT AND CULTURE ASSOCIATION (ISCA)
    Mr Jacob SCHOUENBORG, Project manager, International Sport and Culture Association

    GENERAL ASSOCIATION OF INTERNATIONAL SPORTS FEDERATIONS (GAISF)
    ASSOCIATION GENERALE DES FEDERATIONS INTERNATIONALES DE SPORTS (AGFIS)
    Dr Tamás AJAN, Vice-président

    EUROPEAN NON-GOVERNMENTAL SPORTS ORGANISATION (ENGSO)
    Mr Bengt SEVELIUS, President of ENGSO, c/o Swedish Sports Confederation;
    Mrs Birgitta KERVINEN, Vice-president, ENGSO

    EUROPEAN OLYMPIC COMMITTEES (EOC) / COMITES OLYMPIQUES EUROPEENS
    Mr Patrick HICKEY, Secretary General, European Olympic Committee

    EUROPEAN PHYSICAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (EUPEA)
    Mr Eric DE BOEVER, Secretary General, European Physical Education Association;
    Ms Rose-Marie REPOND, European Physical Education Association

    COUNCIL OF EUROPE / CONSEIL DE L'EUROPE
    Ms Maud DE BOER-BUQUICCHIO, Deputy Secretary General;
    Mrs Irena GUIDIKOVA, Administrator at the Private Office of the Secretary General and Deputy Secretary General;
    Mr Ralf-René WEINGÄRTNER, Director of Youth and Sport / Directeur de la Jeunesse et du Sport;
    Mr George WALKER, Head of the Sport Department;
    M. Stanislas FROSSARD, Administrateur, Service du Sport;
    Ms Ita MIRIANASHVILI, Administrator, Sport Department;
    Mlle Dominique HUBER, Secrétaire particulière du Chef de Service;
    Ms Claire FRASER, Secretary, Sport Department;
    Mr. Muammer TOPALOGLU, Director of Protocol;
    Melle Isabelle FLECKSTEINER, Secrétaire, Protocole;
    Ms Cathie BURTON, Press Officer – Research and Communication Direction,
    Ms Sally BAILEY-RAVET, Responsable des Interprètes

    CONSULTANT
    Mr André Noël CHAKER, Director, Protocol, Events and Legal Affairs, HELSINKI

    APOLOGISED / EXCUSES
    ANDORRA / ANDORRE;
    TURKEY / TURQUIE;
    JAPAN / JAPON;
    CLRAE / CPLRE;
    PARLIAMENTARY ASSEMBLY / ASSEMBLEE PARLEMENTAIRE

    Appendix 4

    List of speakers

    14 October - Theme I

    Mr VEROVNIK, Slovenia

    Mr IVANOV-LUCIANO, Minister of Youth and Sport, Bulgaria

    Monsignor JANUSZ, on behalf of the Holy See

    Mrs KARPELA, Minister of Culture, Finland

    Mrs VOGT, Parliamentary Secretary, Federal Ministry of Interior, Germany

    Mr ORFANOS, Under Secretary for Sport, Greece

    Mrs GIJERLOW, State Secretary, Ministry of Culture, Norway

    Mr MIKKELSEN, Minister for Culture, Denmark

    Mr DIACONU, President, National Agency for Sport, Romania

    Mr CHRISTOPHIDES, President, Cyprus Sport Organisation

    Mr GIERCZ, State Secretary for Sport, Poland

    Mr AZZOPARDI, Chairman, Malta Sports Council

    Mr HRDY, Deputy Minister for Sport, Czech Republic

    M. DRAGOTI, Deputy Minister for Sport, Albania

    Mr SZIGETI, Deputy Minister of Education responsible for Sport, Slovak Republic

    Ms CAPUT-JOGUNICA, Assistant Minister for Sport, Croatia

    Mr SEVELIUS, President ENGSO

    Mr FELLMANN on behalf of the Austrian Minister for Sport

    Mr JOHANSSON, Sweden, representing the Minister of Justice

    M. DRUT, IOC member in France, IOC

    M. PESCANTE, President of the European Olympic Committees, Italy

    M. MEDANHODZIC, Secretary General, Sports Confederation, Bosnia and Herzegovina

    M. KELLER, Director, Federal Sports Office, Switzerland

    Mrs GUNNARSDOTTIR, Minister of Education, Culture and Science, Iceland

    Mrs ZABURYANOVA, Deputy Minister of Sport, Belarus

    San Marino

    Mme REPOND, European Physical Education Association

    ISCA

    M. Chaker

    15 October - Theme II

    Ms ROSS VAN DORP, State Secretary for Sport, Netherlands

    Mr MIKKELSEN, Minister for Culture, Denmark

    Mr O'DONOGHUE, Minister for Sport, Ireland

    Mr FETISOV, Minister for Sport, Russia

    M. LAMOUR, Minister of Youth and Sport, France

    Mr LISSAVETSKY, State Secretary for Sport, Spain

    Mr GIERCZ, State Secretary for Sport, Poland

    Mr HOWMAN, Director General, WADA

    Mrs VOGT, Parliamentary State Secretary, Germany

    M. KELLER, Director, Federal Sports Office, Switzerland

    Mrs MATTILA, representing the Finnish Minister of Culture

    Mr DEMEL, representing the Austrian Minister

    M. DRUT, IOC member in France, IOC

    Mr IWAMOTO, Director of Education, UNESCO

    Mr Pal SCHMITT, IOC member in Hungary, Hungarian Olympic Committee

    Mr Tōnu SEIL, Head of Sport Department, Ministry of Estonia

    Mr SCOTT, Chair of the CDDS

    Mrs GIJERLOW, State Secretary, Ministry of Culture, Norway

    Mr SEVELIUS, President ENGSO

    Mr PESCANTE, European Olympic Committees, Sports Minister, Italy

    Appendix 5

    Press Release

    Sports Ministers stress importance of democracy and transparency in sport

    Budapest 15.10.2004 - European sports ministers today called for democracy, accountability, fairness, solidarity and transparency to be the bedrock of sports governance.

    Meeting in Budapest, Hungary, for the tenth Council of Europe Sports Ministers Conference, ministers said that the principles of good sports governance were the key to widening the popularity of sport, strengthening its place in society and putting a stop to corruption.

    Democratic structures with clear elections, professional organisation and management, accountability and transparency were key principles of good governance, said the ministers. They also stressed the need for sports organisations to develop codes of ethics and procedures for dealing with conflicts of interest.

    The ministers welcomed the progress in the drafting of the UNESCO Anti-Doping Convention and stressed the importance of co-operation between UNESCO and the Council of Europe, which has the only current Anti-Doping Convention.

    The ministers backed Danish Minister Brian Mikkelsen as the governmental candidate for the Vice-Chair of the Board of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and agreed to nominate French Minister Jean-François Lamour as the European representative to its executive committee.



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