Ministers’ Deputies

Information documents

CM/Inf(2012)9        10 April 2012



Council of Europe Progress Review Report 2011

Document prepared by the Directorate General of Administration



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Table of contents

INTRODUCTION 5
HUMAN RIGHTS 15
ENSURING PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS 17

PROMOTING HUMAN RIGHTS 24

EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF THE VULNERABLE 30

ENSURING SOCIAL RIGHTS 44

RULE OF LAW 53
ENSURING JUSTICE 55

STRENGTHENING THE RULE OF LAW AND DEVELOPING COMMON STANDARDS 61

COUNTERING THREATS TO THE RULE OF LAW 67

DEMOCRACY 77
PARLIAMENTARY DEMOCRACY 79

LOCAL DEMOCRACY 83

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY 87

BUILDING A DEMOCRATIC CULTURE 113

GOVERNING BODIES, GENERAL SERVICES AND OTHER 127
GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES 129

RECEIPTS – ORDINARY BUDGET 145
APPENDICES 147

ACRONYMS 151

INTRODUCTION


The Progress Review Report 2011 has been designed following the Pillar/Sector/Programme line structure of the Programme and Budget 2011 and using the new format which was introduced for the first time in 2010.

All programme lines have been examined from four different angles:

· What went well, including the tangible results achieved;

· What did not go well, together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in the future;

· Impact of the 2011 programme results on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013;

· Council of Europe added value and co-operation with other Organisations.

In addition, detailed financial information (in thousand €) has been provided for each programme line, including the Council of Europe/European Union joint programmes active in 2011 and the level of voluntary contributions requested for 2011 and secured by December 2011.

Overview

Overall, the successful implementation rate remained at a high level and reflected a continuous increase in recent years. Of the 214 expected results, 173 were fully achieved (81%, compared to 79% in 2010 and 77% in 2009).

Regarding institutions, the successful implementation rate in 2011 is similar to that of two years ago (89%, compared to 100% in 2010 and 91% in 2009). This was mainly due to the increase in the average “age” of priority cases to be dealt with by the European Court of Human Rights (“the Court”) whereas the expected result was a decrease in relation to 2010. The technical explanation for this is that in 2010 there was a large number of urgent expulsion cases in priority category I which were by definition recent and therefore lowered the average age of priority cases overall. There has been no corresponding flow in 2011 and the 2010 cases have since either been disposed of or have reached a later stage of the procedure both of which have the mechanical effect of raising the overall age of priority cases.

The results are summarised in the table below.

In terms of pillars, the successful implementation rate in the operational pillars was 81% compared to 76% in 2010. It remained stable in the support pillar (84%). The results are summarised in the table below.


Regarding treaty making, in 2011 two new international treaties were opened for signature: the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence and the Council of Europe Convention on the counterfeiting of medical products and similar crimes involving threats to public health.

Four other Council of Europe treaties entered into force, namely:

- the European Convention on Consular Functions;

- the Council of Europe Framework Convention on the Value of Cultural Heritage for Society;

- the European Convention on the Adoption of Children (Revised);

- the Protocol amending the Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters.

During 2011 there were 166 Council of Europe’s treaty developments including 89 signatures and 77 ratifications of Council of Europe treaties.

Moreover, in 2011 the Committee of Ministers adopted 14 Recommendations addressed to the Governments of member States.2

Two Council of Europe's Conferences of specialised ministers were organised: the 9th Council of Europe Conference of Health Ministers (29-30 September 2011, Lisbon, Portugal) and the 17th Session of the Council of Europe Conference of Ministers responsible for Local and Regional Government (3-4 November 2011, Kyiv, Ukraine).

In 2011, the legal frameworks for the conferences of specialised ministers and for intergovernmental committees were revised to enhance the focus of their work and synergies with the Committee of Ministers.

2011 was also marked by the Report of the Group of Eminent Persons on “Living together: combining diversity and freedom in 21st-century Europe” which highlighted the challenges arising from the resurgence of intolerance and discrimination in Europe.

Finally, following in particular the events on the Southern rim of the Mediterranean, the Secretary General was tasked at the 121st session of the Committee of Ministers (11 March 2011, Istanbul), to draw up action plans for the implementation of the new Council of Europe policy aimed at promoting dialogue and co-operation with the countries and regions in the vicinity of Europe which request Council of Europe assistance, based on the common values of human rights, democracy and the rule of law. To that end, the first general frameworks for co-operation with countries which are its immediate neighbors were worked out in 2011.

Human Rights

In the context of the Action Plan adopted at the Interlaken Conference on the Future of the Court, held in February 2010, the Court concentrated on two crucial areas for the effective operation of the European Convention on Human Rights system (the “Convention system”): filtering and prioritisation. The filtering section set up in the Registry has enabled maximum exploitation of the Single Judge mechanism which has achieved striking productivity gains. The prioritisation policy has yet to attain fully its goals.

The Committee of Ministers implemented in 2011 new working methods for the supervision of the execution of the judgments delivered by the Court. These have allowed the Committee of Ministers to concentrate its efforts on cases that, due to their specific nature, warrant enhanced consideration.

A High Level Conference which was held in Izmir on 26-27 April 2011 as a follow-up to the Interlaken Conference provided fresh political impetus and ideas for ensuring the long-term effectiveness of the Convention system.

The follow-up of the Interlaken and Izmir Conferences was also one of the two priority issues on the agenda of the Steering Committee for Human Rights (CDDH), whose work on the enhancement of the Convention system included the preparation of reports on various possible measures including measures which may require amending the Convention, as well as guidelines for the selection of candidates for the post of judge at the Court. The other priority issue dealt with by the CDDH was the preparation of the European Union accession to the Convention, which resulted in particular in the drafting of an accession agreement.

The Commissioner for Human Rights (“the Commissioner”) continued his dialogue with member States and highlighted areas requiring particular attention from a non-discrimination perspective (notably Roma; national, ethnic and religious minorities; people with disabilities; and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons).The Commissioner’s partnership with ombudsmen and other national human rights structures was further developed through continuous bilateral contacts. In 2011, the Commissioner also submitted for the first time written observations to the Court as a third party, using new prerogatives provided in Protocol 14 to the Convention.

The area of human rights law and policy developments saw the adoption of the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence, mentioned above, which was opened for signature in May 2011 and has since been signed by 18 member States and ratified by one as well as the adoption by the Committee of Ministers of guidelines on eradicating impunity for serious human rights violations.

In 2011 the Organisation pursued the move towards a transversal approach which was particularly visible under the Human Right Pillar and had a significant impact on the elaboration of the Programme and Budget 2012-2013.This is particularly important in the areas of Equality, Roma, Migrants and Children.

The work of the Steering Committee for Equality between Women and Men (CDEG) will form the basis of the Transversal Programme on Gender Equality that has been established for 2012-2013.

With regard to Roma, more than 500 mediators were trained in 15 countries and this figure is set to double in 2012. In addition, one of the major results of the transversal approach was the organisation by the Congress, together with the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Roma issues, of the Summit of Mayors on Roma which resulted in a Final Declaration in which more than 300 participants highlighted their responsibility for improving the situation of Roma at local level, expressed their commitment in this regard and endorsed the initiative to create a European Alliance of Cities and Regions for Roma Inclusion as a framework for enhancing local capacities. 2011 also saw the creation of the new Ad hoc Committee of Experts on Roma issues (CAHROM).

In the area of migrants, the Committee of Ministers adopted on 15 June 2011 a Framework for Council of Europe Work on Migration Issues. This document will structure and guide migration activities of the Council of Europe in 2012-2013 shifting them from standard-setting to promoting co-operation and ensuring appropriate follow-up to recommendations/reports of the monitoring instruments. Reflections were pursued on the Council of Europe contribution to the international response to the possible large-scale arrival of irregular migrants and asylum-seekers from the Southern Mediterranean and the Committee of Ministers supported the proposals for action presented by the Secretary General in March 2011 in this respect.

In the area of children’s rights, two legal standards building a “child-friendly Europe” were adopted by the Committee of Ministers (the Guidelines on child-friendly health and a recommendation on child-friendly social services) and the draft Council of Europe Strategy on the Rights of the Child was prepared for adoption in 2012. The ONE in FIVE Campaign to stop sexual violence against children was launched in eight member States and campaign material was translated into 25 languages, partly with pro bono support from the European Economic and Social Committee.

In the field of media and new communication services, 2011 was marked by the adoption of three Declarations on: Internet governance principles; the protection of freedom of expression and information and freedom of assembly and association with regard to Internet domain names and name strings; and the protection of freedom of expression and freedom of assembly and association with regard to privately operated Internet platforms and online service providers.

Rule of Law

With regard to the threats to the rule of law, 2011 confirmed the Organisation’s leading role in several areas and a growing demand for its monitoring and co-operation activities. The importance of MONEYVAL was further highlighted by the request of the Holy See (including the Vatican City state) to participate in MONEYVAL. The third Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime and on the Financing of Terrorism (COP) was held in March. 2011 also saw the accession of Belarus to the Group of States against corruption (GRECO), while the Council of Europe hosted in Strasbourg the “Special Meeting of the United Nations Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee with International, Regional and Subregional Organizations”. Finally, the Council of Europe was active and visible in international cybercrime policies in particular through the Octopus conference and the 10th anniversary of the Budapest Convention held in November and the high-level conference organised by the European Union in April.

Under this pillar, the Council of Europe Convention on the counterfeiting of medical products and similar crimes involving threats to public health, was opened for signature in 2011 and signed by 15 states. There were also developments in several other areas including: the elaboration of a draft text of a convention on trafficking in human organs; the finalisation of the draft Fourth Additional Protocol to the European Convention on Extradition; and the presentation to the Committee of Ministers of a draft recommendation on the rights and legal status of children and parental responsibilities.

In the field of prisons and police, a draft Committee of Ministers’ recommendation on foreign nationals in prison was finalised and a draft Committee of Ministers’ recommendation containing the draft European Code of Ethics for Prison Staff was finalised and approved.

In 2011 the Venice Commission provided more opinions than foreseen (41 instead of the 30 foreseen) and extended its co-operation with Arab countries beyond the area of constitutional justice, focusing in particular on electoral matters. Moreover, the Statute of the World Conference on Constitutional Justice, which has been ratified by 49 constitutional courts and equivalent bodies entered into force.

In respect of data protection, the 30th anniversary of the Convention for the Protection of Individuals with regard to Automatic Processing of Personal Data brought together some 300 participants from 32 countries on the Data Protection Day. In addition, the first non-European state (Uruguay) was invited to accede to the Convention by the Committee of Ministers and should become a Party in 2012.

Democracy

2011 was another important year for the Parliamentary Assembly which debated several high visibility issues such as the report on the investigation of allegations of inhuman treatment of people and illicit trafficking in human organs in Kosovo3, which drew wide media interest, or the religious dimension of intercultural dialogue. In the context of the Assembly’s neighbouring policy and developments in the Arab world, the Assembly also had important debates on the situation in Tunisia and in the Arab World. Moreover, in order to strengthen its political relevance, effectiveness and visibility, the Assembly adopted in June 2011 a report concerning its internal reform.

During the year, the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities enhanced the monitoring of the implementation of the European Charter of Local Self-Government (ECLSG) and implemented the reform of its structures, functioning, working methods and activities, started in 2010.

The Organisation continued to respond to a growing demand for pre-electoral and electoral assistance activities and was successful in designing and implementing confidence-building measures targeting different professional groups and civil society in several conflict-affected areas.

Activities in the area of democratic citizenship were also pursued. In particular the Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education was broadly disseminated and its implementation was supported through the definition of key elements for a follow-up strategy.

With regard to Civil Society and Non-Governmental Organisations, the Conference of international non-governmental organisations (INGOs) reformed its structures and took a more proactive role in supporting priority areas. In addition, the two Civil Society Forums were open to NGOs not members of the Conference of INGOs.

The Education programme promoted Council of Europe’s standards and values and helped further democratic culture. Recommendation (2011)6 on Intercultural dialogue and the image of the other in history teaching was adopted by the Committee of Ministers, and a project on learning the key principles and the functioning of the human rights protection system was launched in cooperation with the Court. The Council of Europe continued coordinating the work on developing qualifications frameworks within the European Higher Education Area and is a leader in policy development for language education.

In the field of culture, the Intercultural cities network was extended to 21 cities from 19 countries. City policies were reviewed and local intercultural strategies were developed or updated.

The Enlarged Partial Agreement on Cultural Routes (EPA), which was established in 2010 in co-operation with the European Union, became operational in 2011 with 14 evaluations of cultural routes carried out and an Advisory Forum held in November with the participation of 100 managers of cultural routes, academics and specialists in cultural tourism.

In 2011, the Council of Europe pursued its work in the area of youth, notably through the training of over 800 youth leaders and administrators from all member States and was particularly active in the field of sports with the adoption of two recommendations: the first ever intergovernmental standard on Autonomy of the sports movement (CM/Rec(2011)3), and a recommendation on match-fixing (CM/Rec(2011)10).

Partial Agreements

2011 saw the accession of Serbia, “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” and Morocco to the Enlarged Partial Agreement on the Co-operation Group to Combat Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking (Pompidou Group); the Russian Federation and Georgia to Eurimages; Malta to the Enlarged Partial Agreement on the European Centre for Global Interdependence and Solidarity (North-South Centre); Georgia to the Enlarged Partial Agreement on Sports (EPAS); and Bosnia and Herzegovina to the Enlarged Partial Agreement on the European Audiovisual Observatory. It also saw the withdrawal of Germany from the Pompidou Group; of Greece, Hungary and United Kingdom from the Enlarged Partial Agreement on the European Centre for Modern Languages (ECML) and of Sweden from EPAS with effect on 1 January 2012.4

Governing Bodies, General Services and Other

Regarding the Secretariat, 2011 saw a major restructuring to increase the Council of Europe’s operational capacity, including trough its external presence, and to improve its ability to secure extra-budgetary resources for priority sectors, in particular by further enhancing its co-operation with the European Union. The former Directorate General of Social Cohesion (DG III) and Directorate General of Democracy and Political Affairs (DGDPA) were disbanded. Their operational activities were assigned to the remaining two directorate generals which were renamed Directorate General of Human Rights and Rule of Law (DG I) and Directorate General of Democracy (DG II). The Directorates of External Relations, Political Advice and Policy Planning, formerly belonging to DGDPA, were put under the direct supervision of the Secretary General. Furthermore, the need to ensure better coordination at the operational level, in particular through the design of country action plans, led to the appointment of the Director General of Programmes whose office has also been placed under the direct authority of the Secretary General.

Regarding staff, in addition to the suppression of 16 posts and appropriations for 5 positions, a change in staff regulations doubling the length of seniority steps and the discontinuation of certain allowances resulted in savings of approximately €0.5 M. These moves together with the measures already taken in July 20105 to contain the growth in staff costs started a clear trend towards the reduction of the staff ratio and the corresponding increase in operational expenditure.

Regarding the implementation of the budget, the overall forecast credit balance for the Ordinary Budget of 2011 amounts to €2.11 M, including receipts in excess of €0.4 M6 and unspent appropriations of €1.71 M (0.8% of total appropriations).

A summary table showing the overall implementation of the Ordinary Budget is included in Appendix I. In addition, each executive review is completed by a table presenting the budget implementation for the programme line concerned (see “Budgetary Resources”). This table presents the following elements:

    · Budget approved by the Committee of Ministers, including, where applicable, part of the General Management Expenditure (GME);7

    · Budget approved by the Committee of Ministers excluding the GME;

    · Total amount of transfers operated on the programme line concerned;

    · Final budget after transfers;

    · Total expenditure ;

    · Balance ;

    · Percentage of expenditure compared to initial and final budget.

Explanations for any significant variances between initial budgets and actual expenditure greater than +/-10% and €15 K are detailed in the executive reviews of each programme.

Figures are presented in thousands of € and are based upon the actual expenditure recorded in the Financial Management System, subject to audit, as of 24th February 2012. Figures may therefore still be subject to minor changes.

With regard to extra-budgetary resources, Council of Europe/European Union Joint Programmes active in 2011 are presented in Appendix III, and a summary table of voluntary contributions for 2011 in Appendix II. Detailed information on extra-budgetary resources is also provided, where applicable, after the executive review of each programme line. With regard to the projects funded through voluntary contributions, it should be noted that some of these projects have been launched before 2011 and/or will be continued beyond. The tables therefore indicate the cost for the total duration of each project and the total amount secured by the end of 2011. Similarly, the European Union contribution to Joint Programmes is indicated for the total duration of the Joint Programme concerned.

In 2011, extra-budgetary resources continued to play a significant role in support of the overall operational capacity of the Organisation, totalling €36.3 M8. This amount included €24.5 M from the European Union for the financing of Council of Europe/European Union Joint Programmes as well as voluntary contributions from member States, states with observer status at the Council of Europe and other donors (€11.9 M).

Conclusion

The first phase of the reform of the Council of Europe undertaken in January 20109 resulted in better internal governance, the merging of the programme and the budget and the streamlining of some secretariat structures.

In February 201110 a second package of reform included an outline of longer-term priorities, the introduction of a biennial programme and budget11, a new proposal for the Council of Europe involvement with civil society12the review of the relevance of Council of Europe conventions.13 The Organisation also reviewed its intergovernmental committees' structure14 and the system of the conferences of specialised ministers15 to ensure more relevance, coherence and efficiency.

This was followed by the restructuring of the operational sectors of the Secretariat to better adapt to the new missions and challenges of the Organisation and enhance delivery capacity including through its external presence.

In November 2011, the Committee of Ministers adopted the first biennial programme and budget of the Organisation, following a similar move in other international organisations including the United Nations and the OECD.

Undoubtedly, the extent and the pace of such a reform were a significant challenge for the Council of Europe. The Organisation had to go through a significant deal of complex internal processes while maintaining a high level of response and achievements at the operational level in a rapidly changing context marked by the economic crisis and the radical political changes in neighbouring regions.

That challenge was met. The bulk of the reform process was completed by the end of 2011 while the rate of successful implementation of activities remained high – over 80% – with a slight increase in respect to the previous year. Moreover, the Organisation managed to further reduce its staff costs and improve the staff ratio. This effort will be pursued during the biennium 2012-2013 and beyond and will help coping with the zero-real growth of the Ordinary Budget due to the current strain on the financial resources of most member States.

Against this background, and looking at the executive reviews of individual programme lines, several lessons can be learned for the future.

Regarding the budget implementation, the overall forecast unspent appropriations for the Ordinary Budget of 2011 dropped below 1%. This represents an improvement in relation to 2010. This low level of under-spending shows that better planning and stringent financial discipline are paying off. The situation of unspent appropriations will however continue to be closely monitored through improved financial reporting in the course of the biennium 2012-2013.

The analysis of the 2011 expenditure by type shows that the level of expenditure on publications remains high. It also reveals that the actual expenditure on consultants, official journeys and hospitality is higher than initially planned. In order to focus the expenditure on the Organisation’s priorities, the rules applicable to consultants, experts and hospitality are currently being reviewed. The review of the publications policy is also underway16.

Regarding extra-budgetary resources, in 2011 there was a strong and growing demand for co-operation and/or monitoring activities in several priority areas. The leading and unique role of the Council of Europe in areas such as the threats to the rule of law and its creative approach in areas such as managing post-conflict situations drew significant support from the European Union and other donors and are likely to attract even more support in the future. In 2011, these activities were to a great extent funded trough extra-budgetary resources, while resources under the Ordinary Budget were relatively low.

The implementation of the Programme and Budget 2011 showed some gaps between Ordinary Budget resources and extra-budgetary resources. These have been addressed in the Programme and Budget 2012-2013 through the redeployment of resources in particular to MONEYVAL and GRETA. However, it appears that in the future additional staff would be required to implement activities financed by additional operational resources from the Ordinary Budget or from extra-budgetary sources otherwise the Council of Europe may not be in a position to fully match the expectations.

Given the Committee of Ministers’ decision to contain the Ordinary Budget at a zero-real growth rate and the corresponding growing importance of extra-budgetary contributions, the issue of staffing levels of priority sectors attracting such contributions will need to be addressed when defining the Council of Europe’s priorities for the biennium 2014-2015. Prior to that, additional redeployments (3-5 posts) from the support pillar to the priority sectors should be considered while adjusting the 2013 Programme and Budget.

With regard to staff management, in several areas, such as the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture (CPT) and MONEYVAL, the replacement of experienced outgoing staff resulted in a temporary drop of the operational capacity. As far as MONEYVAL is concerned, the low number of permanent staff and the high turnover of seconded officials in a context of growing demand for monitoring activities will remain a problem.

In conclusion, 2011 was a positive year for the Council of Europe. A high level of implementation was achieved and the basis for the transformation of the Organisation were established so as to allow the Organisation to work in a more strategic, focused and consistent way, building on its comparative advantages and bringing more value for money to member States and partners.


HUMAN RIGHTS

ENSURING PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS
The European Court of Human Rights

In 2011, the Court again saw a rise in the number of applications allocated to a judicial formation (64 500 in 2011, i.e. 5% more than in 2010), although this increase was smaller than in the preceding years (+7% in 2010 and +15% in 2009). In order to deal with this, the Court concentrated on two main areas: filtering and prioritisation. The setting up of a filtering section within the Registry, enabling maximum used to be made of the single-judge mechanism (37% increase), and the harmonisation of working methods and best practices made significant productivity gains possible.

Indeed, the Court output rose by 27% in 2011 (compared to 16% in 2010). The total number of decisions to strike cases out of the list or to declare cases inadmissible rose by more than 30% (from around 38 000 to approximately 50 000) as compared to 2010. It is true that the number of applications disposed of in judgments fell, but this fall is mainly due to an increase in the number of applications subject to a decision to strike them out of the list following a friendly settlement or a unilateral declaration, and to the fact that the priority policy requires efforts to be devoted to the most complex and time-consuming cases. The proportion of judgments in category I to III rose from 19% of the judgments delivered in 2010 to 27% in 2011.

As to the number of pending applications per lawyer, this rose from 573 in 2010 to 619 in 2011, i.e. a rise of 8%. This trend is due to the still growing numbers of cases pending before the Court (+9% between 2010 and 2011) and, in parallel, a virtually stationary annual average number of case-processing lawyers, although the productivity of case-processing lawyers increased by 22% in 2011, rising from 174 to 213 cases per year (taking into account cases of every kind).

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

58 960

58 960

(40)

58 920

58 438

482

99.1%

99.2%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Strengthening the European Court of Human Rights' Press Unit.

2011/ECHR/
VC/2356

All member
states

400

129

297

Germany

Replacement of the Court's current HUDOC & CMIS case-law database search engine.

2011/ECHR/
VC/2596

All member
states

506

487

506

Cyprus,
Denmark,
Germany,
Norway

Webcasting of the Public proceedings of ECHR.

2011/ECHR/
VC/2109

All member
states

317

50

317

Ireland

ENSURING PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS

Execution of judgments of the European Court of Human Rights

“What went well” – tangible results

The new modalities of supervision, adopted as of 1 January 2011 following the Interlaken Action Plan (Part F.11), have been fully implemented and were positively received by the Committee of Ministers and the member States. The new modalities have allowed both the Department and the Committee of Ministers to better prioritise and thus concentrate the supervision efforts on deserving cases or group of cases: i.e. cases with urgent individual measures or revealing major structural or complex problems (pilot judgments and others). The improved transparency together with more advance presentation of relevant information have in addition allowed states to better prepare for meetings. The number of cases in which the Committee of Ministers could provide the respondent states with efficient guidance (notably through decisions and interim resolutions) in consequence increased in 2011 as compared to previous years. More detailed info on tangible results can be found in document DH-DD(2011)1083. The success of this landmark change of modalities was endorsed by the Deputies in December 2011, and the Committee of Ministers decided to continue their development and implementation.

Targeted co-operation activities and programs were developed and were well received. These have created important synergies for the promotion of execution in key areas (e.g. effective remedies and national capacity for rapid execution of judgments). The positive experiences, both on the part of the Council of Europe and state authorities concerned, especially in cases of important structural problems, were notably highlighted at a multilateral round table in Tirana in December 2011.

Special efforts were deployed to ensure that all “old” backlog cases awaiting only a final resolution would receive a solution so as to allow the new system to start in a “fresh” environment without being hampered by this “historical” work. In 2011, the Committee of Ministers thus closed its supervision of the execution of a record 816 cases (against 455 in 2010) which allowed the eradication of the backlog.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The development of the necessary IT tools required by the new working methods was hampered by the fact that it could only be financed through voluntary contributions, which are by definition uncertain and subject to relatively long negotiation procedures.

The calendar for Human Rights meetings should be reviewed to take fully into account deadlines set by Deputies to receive the necessary documentation in due time.

There is still a high turnover of temporary staff, due to administrative difficulties in organising the competition. This determines a loss of know-how, which is detrimental to the quality of work. There is a need for more specialised long-term staff members as jobs are structural ones.

States capacity to rapidly implement the Court’s judgments and to overcome domestic difficulties is still to be reinforced, especially for the execution of the cases raising major structural or complex issues (as in pilot and quasi pilot judgments).

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The capacity for rapid reaction of the Committee of Ministers to situations requiring its collective supervision action has been enhanced.

The States capacity to submit actions plans/reports within the deadline to the Committee of Ministers has increased.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

3 160

2 934

81

3 015

3 012

3

102.7%

99.9%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Modernisation of tools and methods of the supervision of execution of the ECHR judgments.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2555

All member
states

270

270

36

Andorra,
Bosnia and Herzegovina,
Croatia,
Georgia,
Liechtenstein,
Luxembourg,
Monaco,
Poland,
Spain

Execution of judgements of the ECHR – Acceleration of the execution of ECHR judgments at the national level.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2557

All member
states

650

650

   

ENSURING PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS

Enhancing the effectiveness of the ECHR system at national and European level

“What went well” – tangible results

The Steering Committee for Human Rights (CDDH) successfully pursued work on its two priority issues, namely follow-up to the Interlaken Conference on the Future of the European Court of Human Rights (the Court) and the accession of the European Union to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). As regards current work on the reform of the Court, the CDDH adopted in December 2011:

- reports to the Committee of Ministers on (i) a system of fees for applicants to the Court; (ii) the proposal to introduce a sanction in futile cases; (iii) compulsory legal representation and (iv) the proposal to extend the Court’s jurisdiction to give advisory opinions;

- its Collective response to the Court’s Jurisconsult’s notes on subsidiarity and on the clarity and consistency of the Court’s case-law and transmitted it to the Court;

- its instructions for the finalisation of reports to the Committee of Ministers on (i) increasing the Court’s capacity to process applications and (ii) possible new procedural rules of practices concerning access to the Court, as well as for the preparation of its final report to the Committee of Ministers on measures requiring amendment of the Convention and its contribution to the United Kingdom Ministerial Conference on the future of the Court (April 2012);

- work also advanced considerably on guidelines regarding the selection of candidates for the post of judge at the Court and proposals for a simplified amendment procedure of the Convention;

- a structure for member States’ reports on measures taken nationally to implement the Convention was agreed and a data base set up, which will contain all reports due by 31 December 2011.

The Secretariat assisted the Turkish Chairmanship of the Committee of Ministers in the preparation of the High Level Conference on the Future of the European Court of Human Rights which was held in Izmir, 26-27 April 2011. The Conference provided fresh political impetus and ideas for the reform process.

A comprehensive set of draft legal instruments, including an accession agreement and its explanatory report, were elaborated in close co-operation with the European Commission. Addressing issues which are both legally complex and politically sensitive, the draft agreement contains all necessary adaptations which would allow the full integration of the European Union into the Convention system, while preserving its specific characteristics.

The Committee of Ministers adopted Guidelines on eradicating impunity for serious human rights violations. The CDDH finalised its work on Human Rights and the Environment through the adoption of a revised text of its Manual on the issue.

An increased number of requests were made by member States for Council of Europe’s expertise on key draft legislation. Such support was well received in the requesting countries and the authorities to a large extent integrated the standards of the ECHR and the Court’s case law into their legislation. This played an important role in reforming the criminal justice, legal aid and law enforcement systems in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Republic of Moldova, Serbia, Turkey and Ukraine.

In Serbia and Ukraine, the adoption of Criminal Procedure Codes (CPCs) following a comprehensive Council of Europe’s expertise created the basis for a modern adversarial criminal procedure with necessary safeguards and guarantees. This helped to eliminate many typical problems which served as a major source of repetitive applications to the Court.

Support was provided to the Offices of the Government Agents before the Court to strengthen their institutional role vis-à-vis other actors, and the capacity of their staff was developed for the effective domestic application of the ECHR, execution of the Court’s judgments and prevention of new violations, especially repetitive ones. They also exchanged best practices and established professional contacts with their partners in other European countries, as well as with the Council of Europe.

Civil servants, including key decision-makers from several member States, also developed their capacity for the effective domestic application of the ECHR and strengthened their knowledge on recent developments in the Court and Council of Europe monitoring bodies.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

It was not possible for the CDDH to reach consensus on some issues concerning the reform of the Court. Some of the above-mentioned reports therefore contain a list of arguments in favour and against the proposed issue. With regard to the accession of the European Union to the ECHR, due to the complexity of the issue, the CDDH had to ask the Committee of Ministers for an extension of six months to its original mandate. It then transmitted to the Committee of Ministers a report and draft legal instruments on the accession of the European Union to the ECHR within the new deadline. However, these drafts were not adopted, due to persisting difficulties for some member States related mainly to the political implications of the proposed drafts.

Discrepancies were noted between commitments made by authorities towards the legal expertises’ recommendations and their concrete implementation/application.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The CDDH prepared concrete work for the biennium 2012-2013 taking into account that, in future, it will supervise work on bioethics, gender equality and human rights of persons belonging to national minorities, in addition to its current work on the reform of the Court and development and promotion of human rights.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

A clear added value of the Council of Europe came from the member States’ commitments to implement the ECHR, including the development of national regulatory, structural and procedural frameworks, which provided a very favourable context for capacity building, especially in the light of the Interlaken Declaration.

The Council of Europe co-operated with several international organisations, notably the European Union. In some cases, the co-operation involved national actors who made available their experience, as it was the case with the US Department of Justice for the work on the CPCs in Serbia and Ukraine.

Moreover, the work on the European Union accession, given its legal nature, was a unique example of close and fruitful co-operation with the European Union, particularly with the negotiating team of the European Commission.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 043

968

173

1 141

1 138

3

117.6%

99.7%

Explanation for variances: More activities than initially planned were implemented in the co-operation field and due to additional meetings related to the accession of the European Union to the ECHR and to the reform of the Court.

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Joint Project between the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights and the European Court of Human Rights – Production of a Handbook on case-law covering the area of non-discrimination

11/01/2010

31/12/2011

300

100.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Enhancing the effectiveness of the ECHR system at national and European level.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2575

All member
states

500

250

   

ENSURING PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS

European Committee for the Prevention of Torture (CPT)

“What went well” – tangible results

The CPT carried out 17 visits throughout the year (i.e. 10 periodic visits and seven ad hoc visits). The number of visits envisaged for 2011 (18 visits) was therefore almost reached. Two of the visits (to Albania and Ukraine) had a rapid-reaction component. The CPT also carried out a series of high level talks with the Russian authorities on issues related to the North Caucasian region, and all of the Committee’s interlocutors conveyed a clear message of willingness to co-operate with the Committee.

Reference should also be made to the growing synergy between the activities of the CPT and those of the UN Subcommittee for the Prevention of Torture, which was facilitated inter alia by an increased involvement of the CPT in 2011 in the European National Prevention Mechanisms (NPM) Project.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The CPT’s presence in the field dropped by some 10% in 2011 (149 days) compared to 2010 (166 days). This was mostly caused by the departure of several experienced administrators of the Secretariat and the subsequent reduction in visits – especially ad hoc – during the first two quarters of 2011.

Furthermore, no positive developments have been noted as regards the CPT’s access to regions in which the central authorities are not at present in effective control. In particular, the de facto authorities of the Transnistrian region of the Republic of Moldova are still not ready to accept visits by the CPT on acceptable terms to the Committee and the de facto authorities in one of the regions affected by the conflict in Georgia (South Ossetia) do not seem to wish the CPT to exercise its mandate in that region. Nevertheless, the CPT will continue to explore possibilities for access to all regions in Europe where the central authorities are not in effective control.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The Committee remains intent on placing greater emphasis on ad hoc visits and, in particular, on developing its capacity to respond immediately to urgent situations as they arise, as well as reaching its long term objective of deploying its preventive mechanism over the whole European territory – and even further, if the Committee of Ministers considers it appropriate.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The CPT remains the sole European treaty-based body mandated to visit all places of deprivation of liberty on the continent. It is engaged in a constant and constructive dialogue with other international (ICRC, UN-CAT and UN-SPT, OSCE-ODHIR, European Union) and national (NPM’s) partners, with a view to reinforcing the protection of persons deprived of their liberty against ill-treatment.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

4 609

4 278

(27)

4 251

4 236

15

99.0%

99.6%

PROMOTING HUMAN RIGHTS
Commissioner for Human Rights

In 2011, the Commissioner pursued his continuous dialogue with member States through a series of country visits to address specific human rights issues as well as post-conflict and crisis situations. He made visits to Albania, Armenia, Georgia, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Malta, the Republic of Moldova, Poland, the Russian Federation, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Turkey, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. These visits resulted in detailed reports on priority issues or letters addressed to national authorities including recommendations for the improvement of the human rights situation. In 2011, 20 specific visit reports and letters (12 country monitoring reports and eight country monitoring letters) were addressed to governments following visits or as part of the Commissioner’s dialogue with member States. They are available on the Commissioner’s website and are summarised in his quarterly reports.

In addition to country work, the Commissioner identifies certain thematic areas in order to provide advice on and raise awareness of specific human rights issues. The main themes in 2011 included freedom of the media and non-discrimination (with particular reference to Roma; national, ethnic and religious minorities; people with disabilities; and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons). A report on “discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity in Europe” was published. It was based on two years of socio-legal empirical research and provided a broad overview of the human rights situation of LGBT persons in Europe. A series of “Media Freedom” lectures, given by high-level media experts, were organised by the Commissioner’s Office. They were compiled in the publication “Human rights and a changing media landscape” which covered a wide range of themes: protection of journalists from violence; ethical journalism; access to official documents; media pluralism; public service media; and social media. In 2011, the Commissioner published an Opinion on Hungary’s media legislation in light of Council of Europe standards on media freedom. He also published an Opinion on national structures for promoting equality and an Issue Paper on adoption and children from a human rights perspective. In the course of the year, Commissioner Hammarberg published 29 “Human Rights Comments” on his website, covering a wide range of issues, including austerity budgets, the protection of human rights defenders, and the problem of impunity. He also published a book containing a compilation of his Viewpoint articles “Human rights in Europe: no ground for complacency” identifying the shortcomings that still exist in Europe and suggesting concrete remedies to address them.

The Commissioner’s partnership with ombudsmen and other national human rights structures was further developed through continuous bilateral contacts. He met ombudsmen and representatives of national human rights institutions regularly during his country visits and during international meetings organised by networks of national human rights structures. The Commissioner continued to monitor the situation of non-governmental human rights organisations and human rights defenders in the context of country visits and reporting. He organised a Round Table on “Human Rights Defenders in the Council of Europe Area” which highlighted the need for human rights defenders to co-operate with national human rights structures and with the media. Protocol N° 14 to the European Convention on Human Rights which entered into force in 2010 allowed the Commissioner to intervene as a third party in cases before the European Court of Human Rights. In 2011, the Commissioner submitted written observations to the Court on a case concerning the treatment of a person with disability in Romania. It was the first third party intervention submitted on the Commissioner’s own initiative under Protocol 14.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

2 586

2 586

(41)

2 545

2 533

12

98.0%

99.5%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Commissioner for Human Rights.

2011/CommHR/
VC/2598

All member
states

1 600

900

378

Finland,
Germany,
Monaco,
Norway,
Spain,
Sweden,
Turkey

PROMOTING HUMAN RIGHTS

Development of common standards and policies

“What went well” – tangible results

The Committee of Ministers adopted the new instrument “Guidelines of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe on Eradicating Impunity for Serious Human Rights Violations”. The Steering Committee for Human Rights (CDDH) adopted a new Manual on Human Rights and the Environment and identified new areas for the promotion of human rights, which the Committee of Ministers endorsed in its mandate to the CDDH for 2012-2013. Contacts with external partners were regularly pursued in order to ensure complementarity, coherence and added value, as well as external visibility, of the Council of Europe’s work. The Council of Europe contributed to the preparation of two sessions of the United Nations Universal Periodic Review (UPR) and the Secretariat attended two United Nations’ events related to the follow-up to the UPR recommendations. Inter-secretariat meetings were successfully organised with the United Nations and also with the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, with which co-operation continued with tangible results, including new joint projects. The European Parliament requested the Council of Europe opinion on two draft legal instruments on the human rights of suspects and accused persons, thus increasing the Council of Europe’s involvement in the legislative process of the European Union.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The level of resources did not allow to attend all relevant events organised by our external partners (UN, OSCE, FRA). This was an obstacle to further increased visibility and external relevance of Council of Europe’s action.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The identification of new areas of action for the promotion and development of Human Rights led to the establishment of a new drafting group of the CDDH, which will be in charge of preparing a draft legal instrument on the rights and dignity of the elderly, and the elaboration of two feasibility studies in other areas (corporate social responsibility in the field of human rights; human rights in culturally diverse societies) whose results may have an impact on the Programme and Budget for 2013 and for the following years.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

This programme’s objectives are strictly related to the identification of Council of Europe’s added value in the elaboration of new standards, compared to the standards elaborated by other organisations, and to the improvement of synergies and co-operation with other regional and international organisations in the human rights field. The results of this co-operation bring two sets of advantages, improving the visibility of the Organisation and taking account of the activities and achievements of other partners in the Organisation's work.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

590

547

30

577

574

3

104.9%

99.5%

PROMOTING HUMAN RIGHTS

Capacity building: awareness and training

“What went well” – tangible results

The professional competence and knowledge among legal professionals and key decision-makers of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), and their capacity to apply it at national level, have been developed through “training-of-trainers” (ToT) methodology. This was followed by cascade seminars, in-depth and refresher training sessions, study visits to European Union member States, conferences and round tables in fourteen Council of Europe member States. New ECHR handbooks and other training materials were prepared and published in national languages. Special activities were organised for the Supreme Courts to increase their capacity to provide guidance to lower courts.

Mid-term evaluations were carried out and their results were used to strengthen the responsibilities of the partner institutions in the context of the principle of national ownership of the ECHR. Feedback received from such evaluations carried out of specific projects and from beneficiaries showed that the number of domestic court verdicts in the beneficiary states based on the ECHR increased, and that prosecutorial practices also increasingly referred to the ECHR standards. Regional co-operation between the beneficiary countries was reinforced, contributing to an exchange of experience across the jurisdictions. The emphasis was placed on the issue of enhancing the impact of the capacity building through an analysis of the outcomes of the projects and the preparation of recommendations.

Under the Regional Joint Programme with the European Union on combating ill-treatment and impunity, some 3 200 trainees in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, the Republic of Moldova and Ukraine developed their capacity to effectively investigate and adjudicate ill-treatment. There were already convictions of police officers in these countries, and this trend was increasing – something which was unthinkable before. Under two Joint Programmes with the European Union in Turkey, key decision-makers of the supreme judicial authorities, as well as ordinary judges and prosecutors were trained, the military justice system was analysed and recommendations were prepared. The Joint Programme with the European Union on the transparency and efficiency of the judicial system of Ukraine resulted in the setting up of a system of courts’ financing and the establishment of an automated court workflow system, support to the establishment and consolidation of the High Qualification Commission of Judges and the National School of Judges, procurement of electronic networks in all courts, as well as the full computerisation of the courts in a pilot region and in the regional offices of the National School of Judges.

The synergy with the Registry of the European Court of Human Rights (the Court), the Department for the Execution of the Court Judgments, the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture, and the Office of the Commissioner for Human Rights was developed further, resulting in better identification of gaps and targeted assistance as regards the development of national capacities, particularly in the Court.

The European Programme for Human Rights Education for Legal Professionals (the HELP II Programme) continued to strengthen the implementation of the ECHR in member States by raising the level of knowledge of the Convention and the case law of the Court among all groups of legal professionals. The methodology centred around training and self-learning, and relevant materials and tools were developed and disseminated. The main interface was the HELP website where the products were available free of charge, in a number of languages (http://www.coehelp.org). In addition, the Programme worked directly with national training institutions and professional organisations to help them integrate the ECHR in their curricula and make optimal use of the HELP products. It also included a peer-to-peer and networking dimension, and the European Human Rights Training Network, in addition to the national training institutions for judges and prosecutors, was extended to include Bar Associations and civil society. The HELP Programme served as a resource platform and umbrella for all ECHR capacity building activities.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Not all national training institutions used sufficiently the groups of national ECHR trainers established, or the resources and potential of the HELP II Programme. A frequent turnover of national trainers was also an obstacle. Insufficient IT knowledge among the target groups sometimes impeded the use of new technologies and distance learning courses.

High quality training sessions clearly developed the legal professionals’ capacity to implement the ECHR standards at national level. However, the apparent increase of national judgments in line with the ECHR was still not easily measurable. Using ECHR-based arguments in national judgments and decision-making proved to be a challenging process, dependent on mentalities, internal bureaucracy, professional standards/ethics and other factors. Therefore, continued monitoring of the impact of capacity building is necessary. Member States should also be encouraged to develop their statistics in this field.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

It will be important to ensure the continuity of the support provided to Council of Europe’s member States to ensure a coherent approach towards addressing the needs stemming from membership of the Organisation. Ensuring national ownership and strengthening sustainability will also continue to be a priority if long-term impact and autonomy are to be ensured.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

A clear added value of the Council of Europe came from the member States’ obligation to implement the ECHR, which provided a very favourable context for capacity-building, especially in the light of the Interlaken Declaration. The need to properly execute the Court’s judgments within the framework of the Committee of Ministers’ procedure, and to avoid new violations, especially repetitive ones, also contributed to the necessary political will and commitment by the beneficiary countries.

The Council of Europe co-operated with several international organisations, most notably the European Union, as well as the UNHCR and the OSCE.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 581

1 469

141

1 610

1 601

9

109.0%

99.4%

Explanation for variances: This programme line was reinforced by redeploying one staff member.

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Combating ill-treatment and impunity – Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Republic of Moldova and Ukraine

01/01/2009

300/06/2011

950

50.0%

Democracy Support Programme – Republic of Moldova

04/01/2010

03/01/2012

236

100.0%

Promoting independent national non-judicial mechanisms for the protection of human rights, especially for the prevention of torture (Peer to peer II)

01/03/2010

30/06/2012

1 200

75.0%

Training of Military Judges and prosecutors on Human Rights Issues

03/11/2010

02/11/2012

2 000

100.0%

Reinforcing the fight against ill-treatment and impunity – Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Republic of Moldova and Ukraine

01/07/2011

31/12/2013

750

750.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Capacity Building: Awareness and Training.

2011/DGHL/
VC/2576

Multilateral

2 000

1 300

   

Capacity building: awareness and training for non-judicial human rights protection mechanisms.

2011/DGHL/
VC/2580

Multilateral

1 200

600

   

Combating discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation or gender identity.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2519

All member
states

950

350

150

Finland,
Germany

Supporting the development of journalism teaching in Azerbaijan, phase II.

2011/DGHL/
VC/2692

Azerbaijan

600

100

   

Regional network of self-regulatory bodies.

2011/DGHL/
VC/2711

Armenia,
Azerbaijan,
Georgia,
Republic of Moldova
Russian Federation
Ukraine

900

50

   

European programme for Human Rights education for Legal Professionals.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2350

All member
states

1 900

500

1 500

HRTF

EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF THE VULNERABLE
Protecting the rights of the vulnerable

“What went well” – tangible results

Member States were provided with recommendations to improve the participation of people with disabilities through Recommendation CM/Rec(2011)14 on the participation of persons with disabilities in political and public life.

Member States were provided with information and recommendations on the protection and promotion of the rights of women and girls with disabilities through a draft report and a set of draft recommendations.

Experiences and examples of good practice were exchanged amongst 120 European disability experts at the Conference on the implementation of the Council of Europe Disability Action Plan 2006-2015, Odessa, Ukraine, 30-31 May 2011, under the aegis of the Ukrainian Committee of Ministers Chairmanship.

Member States were assisted in monitoring progress made over time in the implementation of the Council of Europe Disability Action Plan by providing them with a progress review methodology and evaluation criteria.

Member States were assisted in guaranteeing human rights, non-discrimination, equal opportunities, full citizenship and participation of people with disabilities through capacity building seminars (on the reform of disability pensions, 50 social security experts from South East Europe; on the implementation of the Council of Europe Disability Action Plan, 60 disability experts through capacity building seminar) and a study visit (11 Ukrainian disability experts to Belgium).

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Mainstreaming of disability issues in other policy areas remains a challenge. Efforts should be stepped up within the Council of Europe, e.g. by making disability a transversal issue.

Interest of member States in applying the evaluation criteria on the national implementation of the Council of Europe Disability Action Plan seems to be low; no member States volunteered to pilot the project after the document’s adoption. The adopted methodology and evaluation criteria should be used by the newly created Committee of Experts on the rights of people with disabilities (CR-RPD) and other Council of Europe sectors.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Several 2011 topics will be followed up in 2012-2013. Such as, promotion, implementation and follow up of recommendation CM/Rec(2011)12 on children’s rights and social services friendly to children and families, as well as recommendation CM/Rec(2011)14 on the participation of persons with disabilities in political and public life, and possibly a recommendation on protecting and promoting the rights of women and girls with disabilities, subject to adoption by the Committee of Ministers.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Project results bring substantial added-value when compared with activities carried out by other international organisations (UN, WHO, ILO and the European Union), since the Council of Europe takes a coherent and comprehensive social and human rights-based approach to all aspects of disability.

In this field, the Council of Europe co-operates with the following organisations: European Commission, European Union Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA), UN OHCHR, WHO and the following non governmental organisations: Council of Europe INGO Conference, European Disability Forum (EDF), European Blind Union (EBU), European Union of the Deaf (EUD), European Association of Service Providers for Persons with Disabilities (EASPD), Mental Health Europe (MHE), Inclusion Europe, Rehabilitation International (RI), Mental Disability Advocacy Centre (MDAC).

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 318

1 157

(115)

1 042

1 015

27

87.7%

97.4%

Explanation for variances: Operational appropriation amounting to 50K initially planned for Elderly activities were transferred to the Civil Society Programme to finance the Forum for the future of Democracy.

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Implementation of the Council of Europe Disability Action Plan 2006-2015 in Georgia, the Republic of Moldova and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

2011/DG3/
VC/2660

Bosnia and Herzegovina,
Georgia,
Republic of Moldova

75

75

   

EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF THE VULNERABLE

Promoting equality

“What went well” – tangible results

The Steering Committee for Equality between Women and Men (CDEG) held an exchange of information at its 46th plenary meeting on implementation of Committee of Ministers Recommendation CM/Rec(2007)17 on gender quality standards and mechanisms which revealed that some member States consider this recommendation an effective instrument whose measures were to be incorporated into their national programmes, translated and widely disseminated.

The review of the body of Committee of Ministers recommendations undertaken by the CDEG (1979-2011) at its 47th plenary meeting revealed a general agreement on its influence on member state’s action on gender equality, with translation into national languages, wide dissemination and use as basis for national action plans.

The CDEG was actively involved in the development of and the process of transition to the new transversal programme on gender equality.

Four reports were started and completed within the year and their publication authorised by CDEG in December:

· A handbook on gender stereotypes in the media;

· A handbook on gender stereotypes in education;

· A study on combating discrimination against lesbian and bisexual women and girls and transgender persons;

· A study on combating the isolation of Roma women and girls and promoting their empowerment.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The drafting of the planned recommendation on gender equality of migrant women was suspended pending the outcome of the reform of the intergovernmental structures.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The CDEG held its last meeting in 2011. Its achievements and work will form the basis of the Transversal Programme on Gender Equality that has been established for 2012-2013.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

A side-event on Combating Gender Stereotypes (25 February) within the framework of the 55th Session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women was organised.

Training activities were carried out jointly with the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie in Armenia and “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” within the framework of a pilot project on gender budgeting.

The Council of Europe co-operated with UNDP (Kyiv office) in organising an international conference on national gender equality mechanisms (25-26 October).

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

516

479

(13)

466

459

7

95.8%

98.5%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Pilot project of gender budgeting in member States.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2333

Multilateral

400

160

290

Finland,
Spain,
Others (International Organisation of “la Francophonie”)

EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF THE VULNERABLE

Racism and Intolerance – ECRI

“What went well” – tangible results

Detailed recommendations on how to fight racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, anti-Semitism and intolerance were addressed to nine member States. Advice was provided to an additional three member States on how to follow up on recommendations that called for urgent attention.

Civil society in France, Georgia and Serbia was given the opportunity to discuss directly racism-related issues with the competent authorities during ECRI’s national round tables in Paris, Tbilisi and Belgrade.

All member States were provided with detailed guidelines on how to tackle Anti-Gypsyism and discrimination against Roma.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

ECRI’s fourth monitoring cycle will be concluded in 2012 (as planned) and a new cycle will start in 2013.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

ECRI co-operates with all the relevant actors at the global and European level in the field of combating racism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, intolerance as well as discrimination on grounds of colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, religion and language, including: the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA), the European Commission, the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) – notably the Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR’s) – as well as the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD), the Anti-Discrimination Unit of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and various specialised procedures within the United Nations. NGOs are also ECRI’s partners in the fight against racism and intolerance.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 487

1 381

82

1 463

1 457

6

105.5%

99.6%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Racism and Intolerance – ECRI.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2539

3 member
states

100

100

100

Germany,
Turkey

EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF THE VULNERABLE

Roma: Promoting social inclusion and respect for human rights

“What went well” – tangible results

In 2011, the Council of Europe continued to play a leading role in dealing with Roma issues in Europe, demonstrating its capacity to deliver on its commitments following the adoption of the Strasbourg Declaration on Roma in 2010.

The European Training Programme for Roma Mediators (ROMED) was developed and implemented rapidly. The impact and relevance of the programme led to the European Commission joining the Programme with the signature of a Partnership Agreement on 6 July 2011. 10 Council of Europe member States contributed financially to the implementation of the Programme. A European database on Mediators was also created.

The new Ad hoc Committee of Experts on Roma issues (CAHROM) paid particular attention to topical issues such as the situation of Roma asylum seekers in Europe (adoption of an Opinion on PACE Recommendation 1940(2010)), the rise of anti-Gypsyism and racist violence against Roma in Europe (adoption of a draft Committee of Ministers Declaration) and Roma employment. It also adopted an innovative set of working methods to be used as from 2012 for sharing of experience between countries on relevant thematic questions emphasising the evaluation of the implementation of national policies, mutual learning and thematic exchanges of experience and good practices.

In 2011, an innovative transversal approach was introduced, leading to further co-operation within different bodies in the Council of Europe. One of the major results was the organisation by the Congress, together with the SRSG Roma, of the Summit of Mayors on Roma. It resulted in a Final Declaration in which more than 300 participants highlighted their responsibility for improving the situation of Roma at local level, expressed their commitment in this regard and endorsed the initiative to create a European Alliance of Cities and Regions for Roma Inclusion as a framework for enhancing local capacities.

A pioneering development was the creation of an online database on policies and good practices relating to Roma, integrated into the new Council of Europe Roma Portal. The database will provide all relevant stakeholders with valuable information as to existing policies and good practices on Roma related issues available at national, regional and/or local level in the member States.

Under a revised approach to lawyers’ training through in-country sessions focusing on defending human rights of Roma before the national courts, 82 lawyers from France, Greece, Italy and Turkey improved their capacity to use the relevant standards of the European Convention on Human Rights and the European Social Charter in domestic litigation.

Through the Dosta! campaign, awareness-raising activities either at national, regional or local level were organised so as to combat prejudice and stereotypes against Roma. Campaign launches took place in Greece and Kosovo17.

The Council of Europe continued to play an important role in the promotion of Roma women’s rights, notably through the organisation, in co-operation with the Spanish authorities, of the 3rd International Conference of Roma Women and the subsequent adoption of a Declaration. The contribution of Roma youth organisations and Council of Europe youth policies to the implementation of the Strasbourg Declaration on Roma was the focus of a Roma Youth Conference in 2011.

Coordination and co-operation with partner organisations was intensified through regular meetings and participation in conferences and events organised by International Organisations and NGOs, regular meetings of the Informal Contact Group of International Organisations dealing with Roma issues and the International Task Force for the education of Roma (ITFER).

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Some challenges were identified during the first year of the ROMED Programme concerning the involvement of state and local authorities in terms of both national training activities and overall political and financial support. Long-term recruitment, national budgeting, formal recognition of mediators and institutionalisation of their profession also require attention. The situation will be assessed further during the Stocktaking Conference in February 2012.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Four additional member States have shown interest in joining ROMED in 2012 and further financing is expected from the European Union.

Several other actions set in motion in 2011 will also be pursued and consolidated in 2012-2013: further training sessions for lawyers in member States; the CAHROM will carry out concrete evaluation/analysis of national Roma policies in member States; the database on policies and good practices will be constantly improved.

In 2012-2013, the Special Representative of the Secretary General will continue to support the Congress in its action on Roma, notably through the setting-up of the Alliance of Cities and Regions for Roma Inclusion (2nd half 2012). Transversality will also be pursued in areas such as Roma women (preparation for the Roma Women’s Conference in Finland in 2013), youth, children and education, and promoted in other areas of Council of Europe expertise.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Council of Europe offers longstanding recognised experience in Roma issues, whether assisting member States in policy implementation or working in partnership with Roma or non-Roma civil society organisations. Council of Europe added value also lies in its transversal experience, its pan-European dimension, its strong human rights acquis and its unique status as the sole organisation with an intergovernmental committee specifically addressing Roma issues.

In addition to the aforementioned co-operation with other organisations, there are excellent relations with the European Union, which has recognised the importance of the Council of Europe’s experience in its own decisions in 2011 on the European Union Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 648

1 648

425

2 073

2 017

56

122.4%

97.3%

Explanation for variances: 375 K which were not earmarked in the Budget were granted as Council of Europe’s share for the funding of the Joint programme "Intercultural Mediation for Roma communities".

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Intercultural Mediation for Roma communities (ROMED Programme)

06/07/2011

31/03/2012

500

50.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Enhancing the Implementation of the Strasbourg Declaration on Roma.

2011/DG3/
VC/2600

All member
states, Kosovo18

500

500

495

Albania, Croatia,
Cyprus, Finland,
France, Germany,
Montenegro,
Serbia, Slovenia,
Spain, OSCE

EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF THE VULNERABLE

Minorities – National minorities, Regional or Minority Languages

“What went well” – tangible results

Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities (FCNM)

10 new Opinions were adopted by the Advisory Committee and 11 Resolutions were adopted by the Committee of Ministers that contributed to improve the protection of persons belonging to national minorities in the contracting Parties concerned. The monitoring work was also streamlined with the drafting of a new thematic commentary on the language rights of persons belonging to national minorities in progress.

European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (ECRML)

The monitoring work of the ECRML, involving complex reporting by States Parties and evaluation made by the Committee of Experts, was continued in 2011 using efficiently the new outlines that had been introduced for both reports as from 2009. The continuation of the ratification process (one new ratification in 2011) maintained the recognition of the Charter in Europe, broadened its geographical scope, and confirmed its role as one of the important monitoring instruments of the Council of Europe.

Very intensive implementation of the Joint Programme “Minorities in Russia: Developing Culture, Language, Media and Civil Society” took place during 2011. More than 30 different activities targeting further promotion of national minorities and their languages in the Russian Federation. This programme contributed to further promotion of national minorities and their languages in the Russian Federation.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

For the FCNM, some contracting Parties either did not transmit their state reports in time or refused to publish the opinion of the Advisory Committee, which resulted in problems in the planning of the Advisory Committee’s work.

For the ECRML, the delay in reporting by the State Parties created serious problems in the planning of Secretariat activities and hampered the whole monitoring process (reporting delays in States Parties accumulated during 2011).

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The 3rd monitoring cycle of the FCNM is well underway and will be finalised in due time. All State Reports received in 2011 will be examined in 2012.

For the of the ECRML, the need for more practical co-operation between monitoring bodies in the fields of minorities and anti-discrimination was formulated, in particular during two meetings of Presidents of all monitoring bodies of the Council of Europe held in 2011. Further enhancing of such co-operation would be required in 2012-2013.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

As the FCNM has no equivalent in the European Union, the assessment of the Advisory Committee on the situation on minorities is carefully taken into consideration by the European Union bodies. Co-operation with the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities is also of great importance in order to avoid overlapping of standards and good practice.

The Charter remains the only legally binding instrument in Europe (and in the world), which deals with the protection of regional or minority languages. Co-operation with the Eurogroup and within the European Parliament dealing with traditional minorities (two presentation by the Charter done in 2011), and to a lesser extent with the OSCE/HCNM could be beneficial for better implementation of the Charter and stimulate further ratifications.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

2 422

2 249

(14)

2 235

2 215

20

98.5%

99.1%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Minorities in Russia : Developing languages, Culture, Media and Civil Society

17/02/2009

16/02/2012

2 500

90.9%

Promoting Human Rights and Minority Protection – South East Europe

30/11/2011

29/11/2014

3 600

100.0%

EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF THE VULNERABLE

Threats to human dignity: Trafficking in human beings (GRETA) and violence against women

“What went well” – tangible results

The group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (GRETA) carried out evaluations of 10 Parties to the Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings. Seven final country reports were made public and the other three final reports were prepared and are ready to be published once the authorities’ comments will be received.

On the basis of the first three GRETA country evaluation reports, the Committee of the Parties to the Convention issued recommendations to Austria, Cyprus and the Slovak Republic.

In February 2011, the country evaluations of the second group of 10 Parties to the Convention were launched by sending them GRETA’s questionnaire. All replies were submitted within the deadline, which enabled GRETA to carry out visits to three countries from the second group.

The new Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (“Istanbul Convention”) was drafted by the Ad Hoc Committee on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (CAHVIO) and adopted by the Committee of Ministers within the prescribed timeframe. It was opened for signature in May 2011 and has since been signed by 18 member States and ratified by one parliament (Turkey).

From October to December 2011, the Council of Europe organised or participated in over 18 promotional events, including two regional conferences, covering some 30 states.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

GRETA decided to reschedule its meetings in 2012 in order to allow more time for the preparation and translation of reports and other documents.

One country was late in submitting comments to GRETA’s draft report, which delayed the adoption of the final report. For the future, GRETA decided that if a Party does not submit comments within the time-limit set, the final report will be adopted even in the absence of comments. Further, GRETA decided to shorten from six to four months the period for Parties to respond to its questionnaire with a view to ensuring that evaluations are completed within the time-limits set.

The CAHVIO was put under immense pressure to finish negotiations on the text of the Convention. This meant holding meetings with as little as four weeks apart, which did not leave delegations enough time to co-ordinate their national position on the draft text. For future drafting exercises, it is recommended to guarantee a minimum of eight weeks between two meetings.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

It should be noted that in the Programme and Budget 2012-2013 GRETA’s activities are presented under the programme line “Organised crime, Money laundering-MONEYVAL-terrorism, Cybercrime, Trafficking in human beings – GRETA – and counterfeiting of medical products”, and violence against women activities are included under “Equality and diversity”.

Concerning trafficking in human beings, the increase in the budget allocated for operational expenditure in 2012 (by €90 K) will enable the organisation of two additional country evaluations (12 instead of 10).

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings provides a legally binding instrument and a monitoring machinery for evaluating countries’ action. GRETA’s reports contain proposals which will be used by the Council of Europe and other organisations to offer support and technical assistance to states.

With the drafting of the Istanbul Convention, the Council of Europe has firmly established itself as the leading organisation in this area in Europe, if not in the world. The number of signatures (18) within eight months of its opening for signature shows high level of acceptance among governments. The United Nations are helping to promote it through its Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women and UN Women.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 717

1 594

(66)

1 528

1 522

6

95.5%

99.6%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Women and children's rights in Ukraine

29/08/2008

28/03/2011

1 080

90.0%

Strengthening democratic reform in the southern Neighbourhood

29/12/2011

28/12/2014

934

100%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Promotion of the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence.

2011/DGHL/
VC/2656

Multilateral

328

83

100

Poland,
Spain

EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF THE VULNERABLE

Children’s rights

“What went well” – tangible results

The ONE in FIVE Campaign to stop sexual violence against children was launched in eight member States (three more than the minimum target) and campaign material was translated into 25 languages (15 more than the minimum target), partly with pro bono support from the European Economic and Social Committee.

A number of countries are in the process of preparing, with the support of the Secretariat, an integrated approach to tackling violence against children.

In-depth policy reviews on child and youth participation were conducted in Finland, the Republic of Moldova and Slovakia and a draft recommendation developed on this basis was approved and submitted to the Committee of Ministers by the Joint Council on Youth.

Two legal standards building a “child-friendly Europe” were adopted by the Committee of Ministers. Guidelines on child-friendly health and a recommendation on child-friendly social services. The draft Council of Europe Strategy on the Rights of the Child was elaborated in close consultation with all relevant sectors in the Secretariat, national governments, international organisations and NGOs and discussed at a high level conference in Monaco in November. The draft Strategy was submitted to the Committee of Ministers for adoption in 2012. On 27-28 October, a Regional Conference on Stopping Sexual Violence against children was organised in Zagreb (Croatia) in co-operation with the Ministry of Family, Veterans' Affairs and Intergenerational Solidarity and Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Croatia. It brought together participants from 12 member States, including politicians, legal as well as other professionals dealing with children victims of violence, and allowed for a fruitful peer-to-peer exchange of views and exchange of good practice.

Legal expertise was provided to Serbia and to the Republic of Moldova to bring national legislation in line with Council of Europe’s standards, in particular the Lanzarote Convention. Child-friendly justice guidelines were translated into Ukrainian and Bulgarian.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

No voluntary contributions could be secured for the year 2011 and therefore more co-ordinated efforts will have to be undertaken during 2012 to secure the necessary funds for the implementation of the 2012-2015 Strategy on the Rights of the Child.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Due to the success of the ONE in FIVE campaign, the Secretariat received numerous requests to adapt campaign material into non-official languages and provide support to national launching events.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The input of Council of Europe into the work of other organisations resulted in the European Union Agenda on the Rights of the Child published in February 2011, where the European Commission committed itself to promote the Council of Europe Guidelines of 17 November 2010 on child-friendly justice and to take them into account in future legal instruments in the field of civil and criminal justice. This will have an increased positive impact on the co-operation of the Council of Europe with the European Commission.

The co-operation with UNICEF was strengthened even further than in previous years. As a result of several high-level meetings involving the Deputy Secretary General of the Council of Europe as well as constant working level contacts in particular with UNICEF Regional Office for CEE/CIS in Geneva, UNICEF is now actively promoting Council of Europe standards on children’s rights as well as the ONE in FIVE Campaign through their field offices in member States.

At the first-ever meeting of regional international organisations working on violence against children in New York in October, the Council of Europe was praised as a regional leader and co-ordinator of initiatives to eliminate violence against children in Europe. More than 8 000 children participated in surveys on child participation conducted in Finland, the Republic of Moldova and Slovakia and shared their opinions on how their views are heard and taken seriously by their family, schools and public institutions.

Furthermore, a Side-Event “Stopping sexual violence against children through international standards” was organised in co-operation with the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children and the Permanent Mission of Ukraine to the UN on the occasion of the 55th Commission on the Status for Women in New York on 28 February 2011. The objective of this event was to promote the Lanzarote Convention globally and in complementarity with the relevant UN actors.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 380

1 224

(24)

1 200

1 167

33

95.3%

97.3%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Protection, provision and participation for children in Europe.

2009/DG3/
VC/2044

All member
states

1 100

367

1 054

Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, Monaco, Turkey, Others (CEB, Japan Foundation Tokyo, Save the Children Norway)

ENSURING SOCIAL RIGHTS
European Social Charter and European Code of Social Security

“What went well” – tangible results

2011 was the 50th anniversary of the European Social Charter and the many events organised to mark this occasion at national and international level increased the visibility of this treaty and its mechanism. The Committee of Ministers adopted a political Declaration in support of the Charter and initiated a discussion process on how to strengthen the Charter and its follow-up. The European Committee of Social Rights (ECSR) adopted its Conclusions 2011 and XIX-4 in respect of 40 States Parties and the Governmental Committee completed its follow-up to Conclusions 2010 and XIX-3 taking note of numerous measures in law and practice adopted by the States Parties as a follow-up to the conclusions and decisions. The Committee of Ministers adopted two resolutions pertaining to the reporting procedure and seven resolutions on collective complaints decisions. The Charter again operated very satisfactorily, but in view of the increasing workload (more state reports, more collective complaints) as well as of the merger with the Code of Social Security it was decided to carry out an internal restructuring of the Department in order to rationalise and improve work processes.

During 2011 the Committee of Ministers adopted 20 Resolutions on the application of the European Code of Social Security (ECSS) for the period from 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2010. The Resolutions established whether the Contracting Parties complied with the obligations of the Code and its Protocol and serve as a basis for change in the national law and practice.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Too few ratifications of the Charter were achieved, especially of the collective complaints procedure, despite the intentions announced by states, including in the Declaration of the Committee of Ministers. More efforts are required to ensure a more effective follow-up by the Governmental Committee and the Committee of Ministers to the violations identified in the conclusions and decisions of the ECSR. Discussions are on-going within the Rapport Group on Human Rights on how to strengthen the follow-up.

Governmental changes put on hold ratification processes of the Code in the Slovak Republic, the Republic of Moldova and Lithuania.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The 2011 programme results, the 50th anniversary and not least the Declaration of the Committee of Ministers on this occasion all confirmed that the Charter is a cornerstone in the European human rights architecture alongside the European Convention on Human Rights and demonstrated the political relevance of this treaty.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Charter mechanism is unique in Europe not only in terms of its substantive and geographical scope, but also on account of the mutually reinforcing effect of its two procedures: the reporting procedure and the collective complaints procedure. The Charter continues to be a reference for domestic courts and an inspiration and co-operation partner for other Human Rights mechanisms at international and national level, including the ILO, the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the European Union Fundamental Rights Agency, the European Union Economic and Social Committee, national human rights institutes and ombudsmen.

The Code guarantees compliance with measurable social security standards. No similar standard-setting instrument currently exists at the European Union level. The monitoring mechanism of the Code is carried out in close co-operation with the International Labour Organisation (ILO).

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

3 395

3 117

128

3 245

3 223

22

103.4%

99.3%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Regional Programme for Social security Coordination and Social security Reforms in South East Europe

01/03/2008

31/08/2011

1 977

90.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Guaranteeing social rights in the Russian Federation: towards ratification and implementation of the Revised European Social Charter.

2009/DGHL/
VC/2062

Russian
Federation

180

60

   

ENSURING SOCIAL RIGHTS

Public health and Bioethics – Drug Abuse and illicit Trafficking (Pompidou Group)

“What went well” – tangible results

In respect of Bioethics, five ratifications and two signatures were registered of the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (Oviedo Convention) and/or its Additional Protocols.

A background paper and a consultation paper was finalised on genetics and insurance, and on medical treatment in end of life situations.

Active co-operation took place with other Council of Europe committees namely on transplantation of organ and organ trafficking, family law as well as data protection issues. Co-operation with the European Commission was reinforced on ethics of research and biobanks.

In the health area, a Declaration was adopted by the 9th Conference of Health Ministers (29-30 September 2011, Lisbon, Portugal) on “Child–friendly health care: building a healthy future for and with children”.

CM/Rec(2011)13 on mobility, migration and access to health and the Guidelines on child-friendly health care were adopted.

The European Health Committee (CDSP) approved the draft Recommendation on implementation of good governance principles in health systems, to be submitted for adoption by the Committee of Ministers.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

In respect of Bioethics, the complex and sensitive issues addressed required more time and work than foreseen to achieve the expected results on genetics and insurance thereby affecting progress in other works. The preparation of a draft Addendum to the Explanatory Report of the Additional Protocol on the Transplantation of Organs and a seminar requested by a member state had to be postponed. In the field of Health, the submission of the draft Recommendation on mobility, migration and access to health care for adoption by the Committee of Ministers was delayed.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

In respect of Bioethics, results achieved and decisions taken regarding the working method will improve management and increase work efficiency of the activities programme 2012-2013.

Following the decision of the Committee of Ministers to discontinue the European Health Committee (CDSP), possible health related activities will be carried out under the authority of the Committee for Social Cohesion (CDCS).

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

Work carried out in the field of Bioethics remained unique among intergovernmental organisations, by the issues addressed and its human rights based approach. Co-operation with other organisations continued to progress, in particular with the European Union, facilitated by a close co-operation in the field of biobanks with a view to the re-examination of Council of Europe Rec(2006)4.

All relevant major stakeholder participated in preparations of the two main outcomes in the field of Health: Rec(2011)13 on mobility, migration and access to health care (International Organisation for Migration and the guidelines on child-friendly health care).

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 396

1 225

18

1 243

1 175

68

95.9%

94.5%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Protection of patient's rights in end of life situations.

2011/DG3/
VC/2597

All member States,
Australia, Canada, European Union,
Holy See, Israel,
Japan, Mexico,
United States

78

78

   

ENSURING SOCIAL RIGHTS

… Public health and Bioethics – Drug Abuse and illicit Trafficking (Pompidou Group)

Enlarged Partial Agreement

Created in 1971

34 members

“What went well” – tangible results

The Pompidou Group brought together Ministers and policy-makers to decide on pan-European Policy Guidelines to policy-makers for the elaboration of coherent policies for licit and illicit drugs. It provided Trans Atlantic Executive training for drug policy advisers from 21 member and non-member States, ensured coordination of law enforcement agents, regulatory bodies and specialised prosecutors to combat illicit drug trafficking via international airports and chemical precursor diversion, established co-operation programmes on drug treatment; drug prevention, drugs in prisons and exchanged good practices for front-line workers Europe-wide.

Moreover, flexible working methods allowed the Group to bring in new topics and deal with them in innovative ways (Chemical Precursor Diversion/Drugs at the Work Place/ Substitution treatment and Driving/Drugs and Driving).

Four new states joined the Pompidou Group in 2011, one of them with effect on 1 January 2012.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The withdrawal of one member States drew attention to the need to consolidate the relations with the ‘older’ member States and the need to ensure a balanced approach which responds to the interests of all member States in terms of drug demand and supply reduction activities.

Some planned activities were postponed (the work on effectiveness of evaluation tools of prevention campaigns and the training for young researchers) to a later date in the light of newly emerged priorities for the Group (i.e. three major ad hoc working groups: one on measures to prevent drug trafficking at world wide scale; one on drugs at the work place and another one on substitution treatment and driving).

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Governments showed stronger interest for the creation of a pan-European drug strategy and guidelines for the development of national drug strategies respecting a balanced approach between drug demand and drug supply reduction activities and created the willingness from authorities to be assessed on the basis of these guidelines.

Electronic co-operation tools for law enforcement purposes were devised and networks for co-operation in the Southern Mediterranean Region were reinforced resulting in a higher potential for drug seizures at international airports.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Pompidou Group is the sole pan-European coordination Group to tackle drug issues based on a coherent and integrated concept of drug strategies, whilst respecting human rights and ethical reflections. It brings together experts from different fields and creates networks which allow for direct action (e.g. on drug trafficking in international airports).

The Group closely co-operates with specialised bodies at European Union (European Commission and EMCDDA) and international level (UNODC; INCB and WHO) and provides a forum for open debate and action for policy-makers.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

1 604

15

1 619

1 576

43

98.3%

97.3%

Receipts

1 604

15

1 619

1 619

 

100.9%

100.0%

Contributions of
member States

1 604

 

1 604

1 604

 

100.0%

100.0%

Other receipts

 

15

15

15

 

 

100.0%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Mediterranean Network of co-operation on drugs and addiction.

2010/DG3/
VC/2335

Algeria, Egypt,
Lebanon, Morocco,
Tunisia

666

300

475

Cyprus,
France,
Italy

Contributing to the development of effective drug policies.

2011/DG3/
VC/2680

All member States, Israel, Baltic states, Caucasian countries, Central Asia, South-East Europe, Morocco, Pompidou Group

460

110

7

Slovenia

ENSURING SOCIAL RIGHTS

European Directorate for the Quality of Medicine (EDQM, Pharmacopoeia)

Partial Agreement

Created in 1964

37 members

“What went well” – tangible results

The EDQM’s Medium Term Strategy 2012-2015 was developed.

The visibility of Council of Europe activities in the field of combating counterfeit medical products with the signature of the Medicrime Convention by 15 countries was increased.

More than 100 new Reference Standards were added to EDQM’s three catalogues (Ph. Eur. RS, ICRS, ISA).

More than 1300 production runs undertaken in order to ensure reference standards of adequate quality were available to users.

Successful symposium with more than 100 participants was held in September on the subject of the 3Rs programme (Refine, Reduce, Replace the use of animals in laboratory experiments) which also marked the completion of three projects.

The Pharmeuropa Online was developed and deployed, including DRT (document review tool) with the aim of increasing the number and value of contributions of users of the Ph.Eur. on the draft monographs during the public consultation exercise.

Handling times of CEP (certificate of suitability to the monographs of the Ph.Eur.) applications were further reduced due to stream-lining of the procedure, while at the same time experiencing a 12% increase in the number of applications/requests for revisions received and introducing a Distant Assessment process for Inspections according to GMP Guidelines.

The EDQM ISO 9001 certificate for certain EDQM activities was extended following the successful ISO audit (no non-conformities with ISO requirements detected). The successful ISO 17025 mutual joint audit of the EDQM laboratory in preparation of ISO accreditation-related audit that will take place in 2012 (non-conformities qualitatively and quantitatively within the expected range) was carried out.

A model to introduce cost accounting system for all EDQM’s activities was established; data will be entered into the database in 2012.

An overall 4% increase in orders processed for all EDQM products was reached, especially for chemical reference standards, resulting in an overachievement in expected sales revenues.

The methods for Budget planning/execution were further improved compared to previous years following the introduction of new ways of working at the EDQM.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Funding for new projects and programmes identified in the EDQM’s Medium Term Strategy 2012-2015 is available and the reimbursement of contributions to member States will continue.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

Memorandums of understanding were signed with the WHO, the Russian Federation and Ukraine to reduce duplication of efforts and share knowledge in the area of Certification activities.

A request for observer status to the European Pharmacopeia Convention was received from Singapore.

Establishment of a new co-operation agreement with the European Commission in the field of blood products (including funding from the European Union).

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial
budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

Expenditure

39 093

4 032

43 125

31 948

11 177

81.7%

74.1%

Grant to the investment
budget

2 100

 

2 100

2 100

 

100.0%

100.0%

Reserve for future
investments

5 994

3 832

9 826

 

9 826

   

Other expenditure

30 999

200

31 199

29 848

1 351

96.3%

95.7%

Receipts

39 093

4 032

43 125

43 125

 

110.3%

100.0%

Contributions of
member States

2 835

 

2 835

2 835

 

100.0%

100.0%

Sales and activities
receipts

30 030

3 117

33 147

33 147

 

110.4%

100.0%

Balance from previous
years' budgets

4 818

891

5 709

5 709

 

118.5%

100.0%

Contribution from the
European Communities

1 100

39

1 139

1 139

 

103.6%

100.0%

Other receipts

310

-15

295

295

 

95.2%

100.0%

Explanation for variances: The reserve for future investments is foreseen for funding investments projects in the future. Therefore no expenditure is committed on this budgetary line.

RULE OF LAW

ENSURING JUSTICE
Independence and efficiency of justice

“What went well” – tangible results

The 2010-2012 evaluation cycle of European judicial systems is under way with the active participation of 46 member States and should result in a new report by September 2012. The judicial data collection systems were assessed in Turkey, the Netherlands and Austria. The European Observatory of timeframes of judicial proceedings aiming both at qualitative and quantitative approaches of judicial time management in courts is being set up. Tools and court coaching programmes for facilitating the concrete implementation of the SATURN tools on case flow management were designed and experimented with five pilot courts. Tools and court coaching programmes for promoting the quality of justice and court user satisfaction surveys were designed and experimented with eight pilot courts. A European Commission for the Efficiency of Justice (CEPEJ) Road Show enabling to promote CEPEJ tools among the justice practitioners was launched (Albania, Georgia, Serbia, Switzerland). CEPEJ is regularly invited to take part in the debate on justice in Europe and beyond through various fora (35 events in 20 member States and Brazil), two Newsletters were published and its website is regularly consulted by policy-makers, justice professionals and academicians. Targeted co-operation took place with Azerbaijan and Malta. Proposals for targeted co-operation (to be organised with the European Commission) for reforms of the justice system have been agreed with Morocco and Tunisia and proposed to Serbia. The Lisbon Network of judicial training institutions was revived as part of the CEPEJ activity programme.

The Opinion of the Consultative Council of European Judges (CCJE) on “justice and new technology” and the Opinion of the Consultative Council of European Prosecutors (CCPE) on "the relationships between prosecutors and the prison administration" were adopted according to the respective terms of reference. The CCJE adopted in addition a report on the situation of the judiciary and judges in the different member States.

Key strategies for the justice sector (Republic of Moldova) and laws regarding the judiciary and legal professionals (Ukraine, Armenia) were drawn up with the Council of Europe’s assistance: shortcomings in terms of compatibility with relevant European standards could be addressed. Gaps and best practice as regards the implementation of European standards for the independence of justice were identified in five Eastern Partnership countries. Judicial training schools of Armenia, Georgia and Ukraine were able to improve their initial and continuous training of lawyers, judges and prosecutors according to European standards. Turkey is reforming its court management system following the Council of Europe’s norms and practices: this reform, trialled with pilot courts, will contribute to ensuring the application of the right to a fair trial and shortening trial duration in line with Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights requirements.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The impact of Council of Europe’s recommendations in certain member States is very much dependent on the support by the national authorities. Certain recommendations were either disregarded or partly implemented. A disproportion between the efforts made by the Secretariat and actual results could be observed in some member States.

It was not possible to optimise the co-operation for normative reforms under the ordinary budget and in widespread co-operation the countries of South-Eastern Europe.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Projects aimed at reforming the judiciary seek to help the beneficiaries addressing the shortcomings assessed by Council of Europe’s monitoring bodies such as the European Court of Human Rights (the Court) or advisory bodies as CEPEJ, the Venice Commission, CCJE and CCPE. It is important that the current level of budget allocations under the Ordinary Budget is maintained to allow the Council of Europe to assist countries which do not currently benefit from extra-budgetary resources, in particular from South-Eastern and Eastern Europe.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

A solid co-operation has been established with the European Union bodies as regards the efficiency and quality of justice.

European norms on justice are the norms defined within the Council of Europe including the Court. Such norms are shared by the European Union and beyond. The Council of Europe monitoring mechanisms have described in great details the requirements of an independent and efficient judicial system.

CEPEJ specific mechanisms and tools are a main reference among policy-makers, justice practitioners and academicians in Europe and beyond for strengthening the efficiency and quality of the public service of justice: European Union, IMF, World Bank, OECD and other international bodies refer explicitly to the CEPEJ report evaluating the functioning of justice systems, in particular in the current financial and economic context. CEPEJ findings are used by national institutions, professional organisations and researchers of the majority of member States and beyond (Brazil, Middle East, Northern Africa).

The Joint Programmes with the European Union continue to be important tools allowing a comprehensive capacity-building action in the beneficiary countries.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

2 156

2 001

(252)

1 749

1 737

12

86.8%

99.3%

Explanation for variances: 100 K earmarked in the budget as Council of Europe’s share for the funding of Joint Programmes were allocated to other Joint Programmes on other programme lines.

Extrabudgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Transparency and efficiency of the judicial system in Ukraine

02/06/2008

31/12/2011

5 400

90,0%

Support for Access to Justice in Armenia

01/10/2009

31/12/2012

3 962

95,2%

Democracy Support Programme – Republic of Moldova

04/01/2010

03/01/2012

471

100,0%

Enhancing the Role of the Supreme Judicial Authorities in respect of European standards

09/01/2010

08/07/2013

3 914

98,0%

Council of Europe Facility for Eastern Partnership

01/03/2011

31/08/2013

909

100,0%

Introduction of the appeal in the Russian judiciary system

23/12/2010

22/06/2013

1 500

93,8%

Strengthening the court management system (Phase II)

19/05/2011

18/05/2013

5 264

95,7%

Strengthening democratic reform in the southern Neighbourhood

29/12/2011

28/12/2014

1 225

100,0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Independence and Efficiency of Justice.

2011/DGHL/
VC/2577

Multilateral

1 200

1 200

   

Promotion of Judicial Reform, and Human and Minority Rights in Georgia.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2361

Georgia

2 813

1 020

2 688

Denmark

ENSURING JUSTICE

Prisons and Police

“What went well” – tangible results

A draft Committee of Ministers’ recommendation on foreign nationals in prison was finalised and a draft Committee of Ministers’ recommendation containing the draft European Code of Ethics for Prison Staff was finalised and approved. The 16th Conference of Directors of Prison Administration (CDAP) with the participation of Directors of Probation Services took place in Strasbourg in October and conclusions containing specific proposals on issues related to overcrowded prisons were adopted; proposals and time-frame for the implementation of Resolution No 2 adopted at the 30th Conference of Ministers of Justice were discussed and approved.

Assistance was provided to relevant institutions in seven countries (Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, the Republic of Moldova, Turkey and Ukraine), to improve prison management, detention conditions and health care in prisons, to reduce prison overcrowding by increasing the use of community sanctions and measures and by establishing a fully functional probation service, to increase the capacity building for prison staff, and to improve the conditions and the treatment of all categories of prisoners, especially vulnerable groups. Focus was also placed on the application of medical ethics, on the provision of mental care and the measures to prevent the spread of contagious diseases in prisons.

Legal expertises were provided to the authorities of Armenia and the Republic of Moldova on the relevant provisions of the Criminal Code and Criminal Procedure Code related to community sanctions and alternatives to pre-trial detention and on the probation law. The expertises contained assessments of compliance with European standards, particularly the European Convention on Human Rights and the Committee of Ministers’ Recommendation (2010)1 on the Council of Europe Probation Rules and European best practices as well as comments and suggestions regarding the organisation and the functioning of the Probation Service in order to support the rehabilitation of the offenders under probation supervision and reduce recidivism.

Core groups of trainers were trained among prison staff (Turkey) and judges and prosecutors (Republic of Moldova) in training-of-trainers sessions and through cascade training provided to their peers and 12 350 prison staff and around 400 judges and prosecutors were trained. Training manuals were prepared and used during the training sessions. New offending behaviour programmes were developed for psycho-social staff in prison (Turkey). Support was provided to judges and monitoring boards (Turkey) for the establishment of an efficient independent inspection mechanism as a fundamental safeguard against human rights violations in prisons. As regards police, ways of improving the monitoring and handling of complaints were elaborated with the officials of the Ministry of the Interior, the Commissioners for Human Rights from all the states and Stavropol Region of the North Caucasus Federal District of the Russian Federation. Expert advice was provided for the refurbishment of the temporary detention isolator of the General Police Commissariat in Chisinau to facilitate the final transfer of the responsibility over the pre-trial detention from the Ministry of the Interior to the Ministry of Justice (Republic of Moldova). Dialogue was established with the law enforcement agencies and the media representatives related to freedom of expression (Chechen Republic of the Russian Federation) and on the need to take a multidisciplinary approach towards the prevention and inspection of domestic violence (Turkey).

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The impact of co-operation activities under Council of Europe’s initiatives is very much dependent on the support by the national governments. Political developments can lead to important shifts in prison policy. Although the development partners largely follow similar objectives and standards, and are able to attain an acceptable level of coordination, national authorities should make efforts to adopt consistent long-term strategies for their prison systems.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The results in 2011 of all standard-setting activities in the field of prisons will have a substantial impact on the 2012-2013 Programme and Budget, in particular regarding the follow-up to Resolution No 2 adopted at the 30th Conference of Ministers of Justice. In 2012-2013 these activities will consist in monitoring the implementation of the European Prison Rules, the European Rules for juvenile offenders subject to sanctions and measures, the Council of Europe Probation Rules and other relevant legal standards in the penitentiary field including the promotion of the afore mentioned future Recommendations on foreign prisoners and on the European Code of Prison Staff Ethics and ensuring, where necessary, their regular update. In addition, an assessment and stock-taking of existing problems will be carried out, in particular concerning overcrowded prisons, in order to, if needed reinforce the legal framework in this field. Such follow-up requirements will also have an impact on the collection of specific data which may be increased for this purpose. In addition, the number of regular high-level meetings of the national prison and probation administrations could be increased and could also involve the participation of Ministries of Justice to enhance the promotion of existing standards and to enable in-depth discussions on best practices and existing problems while benefiting from the first-hand practical experience and knowledge of representatives of the different prison administrations.

Due to the Council of Europe’s authorship of the most important European standards for prisons and adjacent areas of criminal justice, the Council of Europe is regarded as an important international partner for in-country technical assistance projects in these fields. The direction of co-operation activities carried out in 2011 shall be continued in the coming years and continuous political pressure on national governments will be important in order to ensure an acceptable level of legal guarantees, of material conditions and of treatment of prisoners in all Council of Europe’s member States.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The assistance activities take as a starting point the fact that the Council of Europe has developed in the course of the last 50 years important standards regarding prison conditions, treatment of prisoners, sentencing policies, decreasing the use of imprisonment, as well as developing alternatives to custody. The Council of Europe’s standard setting and monitoring structures, and the European Court of Human Rights’ case law give the co-operation activities a unique legitimacy and credibility in the target countries.

The Council of Europe has maintained excellent co-operation with a range of national and international organisations involved in the reform of the criminal justice system. The Council of Europe participates in donor coordination initiatives and makes itself an important effort to put in place a coordination mechanism where one does not exist or is not functional. Particularly good co-operation and exchange of information exists with the European Union. The co-operation with Delegations of the European Union in beneficiary countries is usually very strong in the rule of law field which gives an effective impetus to the new joint programmes. Finally, the added value of the Council of Europe also lies in the synergies it develops between different joint programmes and other activities. The co-operation with the OSCE and the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights was also further strengthened in 2011.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 144

1 063

(113)

950

943

7

88.7%

99.3%

Explanation for variances: 35 K earmarked in the budget as Council of Europe’s share in the funding of the Joint Programme "Capacity building of law enforcement agencies and prison reform", which was not signed, were allocated to other Joint Programmes on other programme lines.

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Dissemination of Model Prison Practices and Promotion of the Prison Reform in Turkey

01/03/2009

31/08/2012

4 176

100.0%

Democracy Support Programme – Republic of Moldova

04/01/2010

03/01/2012

761

100.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Enhancing recruitment procedures and training of staff for the State prison of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

2011/DGHL/

VC/2737

Bosnia and Herzegovina

816

15

816

USA

Prison and Police.

2011/DGHL/
VC/2578

Multilateral

1 200

600

   

Support for prison reform in Ukraine.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2263

Ukraine

1 000

500

1 098

Sweden

Transferring international know-how to national preventive mechanisms against torture (NPMs).

2009/DGHL/
VC/2236

All member States which set up NPMs

1 200

240

701

Germany,
Liechtenstein,
HRTF19

Promoting effective public monitoring of places of deprivation of liberty in Russia (''PMC Project'').

2011/DGHL/
VC/2659

Russian Federation

4 000

588

550

Denmark,
Germany,
HRTF

STRENGTHENING THE RULE OF LAW AND DEVELOPING COMMON STANDARDS
European Commission for Democracy through Law (Venice Commission)

Enlarged Partial Agreement

Created in 1990

57 members

“What went well” – tangible results

The Commission was very productive, adopting more opinions than foreseen. It provided assistance on constitutional reform to several countries (Bosnia and Herzegovina, Hungary, the Republic of Moldova, Montenegro and Ukraine); its involvement in this sphere attracted much interest and was particularly valued also at European and international level. Opinions on national legislation contributed to reforms in several countries, in particular with respect to the protection of fundamental freedoms and electoral legislation. In other countries the reform process is still ongoing.

Co-operation with Arab countries, first of all with Tunisia, developed significantly, extending beyond the area of constitutional justice and focusing in particular on electoral matters.

The rapid ratification and entry into force of the Statute of the World Conference on Constitutional Justice by 49 constitutional courts and equivalent bodies is a clear success. It shows that the co-operation with the courts (Bulletin on Constitutional Case-Law, CODICES database, workshops, amicus curiae opinions) is highly valued by courts in and beyond Europe.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

In some countries political difficulties or resistance to change prevented the implementation of recommendations of the Commission or were an obstacle to starting necessary reforms. Political support by Council of Europe organs, the European Union and by other states was crucial to ensure the impact of Venice Commission opinions in such situations. The Commission is short of resources especially for translation and ensuring the linguistic quality of documents in non official languages. The heavy workload and the constant time pressure make it difficult to maintain the quality of the opinions. Priority was therefore given to providing opinions to member States as opposed to general studies. Further prioritising will be required in 2012-2013.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Since the Commission works mainly upon request, there is no direct link. However, a number of 2011 activities will have to be followed up in 2012-2013. The high level of activities in 2011 indicates that there will be as much, if not more, demand for the Commission’s services in 2012 and 2013. Moreover, the Commission started to co-operate in a concrete manner with Tunisia and other Arab countries. This co-operation will be stepped-up in 2012-2013.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The leading role of the Commission in the constitutional field is generally recognised. It contributes to the visibility, reputation and influence of the Council of Europe due to its high standing in particular in Central and Eastern Europe. The European Union supports the legal and constitutional advice provided by the Commission in its relation with candidate and neighbouring states and encourages the Commission, including through funding, to develop its activities in Central Asia and the Southern Mediterranean. The Commission closely co-operates with OSCE-ODIHR, adopting joint opinions and guidelines and works on an ad hoc basis with other OSCE bodies such as the High Commissioner for National Minorities.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage (Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

3 567

 

3 567

3 560

7

99.8%

99.8%

Receipts

3 567

 

3 567

3 562

-5

99.9%

99.9%

Contributions of
member States

3 562

 

3 562

3 562

 

100.0%

100.0%

Other receipts

5

 

5

 

-5

   

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

EU-Central Asia Rule of Law initiative

16/12/2009

15/12/2011

600

100.0%

Assistance to the Bolivian authorities to implement the constitutional reform of the state

15/03/2010

14/03/2012

270

100.0%

Assistance to the authorities in reforming the legislation of Kyrgyzstan following the constitutional referendum of 27 June 2010

01/08/2010

31/01/2012

80

100.0%

Support to the Election process in Kazakhstan

23/12/2011

22/10/2012

500

100.0%

Strengthening democratic reform in the southern Neighbourhood

29/12/2011

28/12/2014

1 061

100.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Venice Commission Voluntary Contributions.

2011/CDL/
VC/2565

Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Croatia, Egypt, Georgia, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kirghizstan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Mauritania, Mauritius, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Palestinian National Authority, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Serbia, Seychelles, Slovenia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Yemen, Zambia, Zanzibar, Zimbabwe

1 400

445

188

France,
Italy (Regione del Veneto),
Netherlands,
Turkey

STRENGTHENING THE RULE OF LAW AND DEVELOPING COMMON STANDARDS

Development of common standards and policies

“What went well” – tangible results

In respect of criminal law, a draft text of a convention on trafficking in human organs was prepared and a committee of experts started examining it.

A report taking stock of “the sentencing, management and treatment of ‘dangerous’ offenders” was finalised and its follow-up was approved.

A report on standard model provisions in the field of criminal law was finalised and approved.

A Draft Fourth Additional Protocol to the European Convention on Extradition and its draft explanatory report were finalised. Seven additional member States ratified the Council of Europe Convention on the Protection of Children against Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse (17 ratifications and 26 signatures).

The first meeting of the monitoring mechanism (Committee of the Parties) to the Council of Europe Convention on the Protection of Children against Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse took place in December.

The Medicrime Convention was opened for signature in October (15 states have signed).

In the public and family law field, a draft recommendation on the rights and legal status of children and parental responsibilities was finalised and approved by the European Committee on Legal Co-operation (CDCJ). The text was sent to the Committee of Ministers to be adopted in 2012.

As far as the Draft Recommendation on the role of public prosecutors outside the criminal justice system is concerned the 4th and last meeting of the Group of Specialists on the Role of Public Prosecutors outside the criminal field (CJ-S-PR) took place in December. The draft recommendation and its explanatory memorandum will be submitted to the CDCJ for approval at its next meeting in June 2012.

Concerning the promotion of the Council of Europe’s Guidelines on child-friendly justice, an inter-secretariat task force was put in place.

In respect of data protection the 30th anniversary of the Convention for the Protection of Individuals with regard to Automatic Processing of Personal Data was successfully organised (over 300 participants from 32 countries) on the Data Protection Day. Events were organised around the world and the ‘privacy day’ (terminology used outside Europe) is increasingly celebrated.

The first non-European state (Uruguay) was invited to accede to the Convention by the Committee of Ministers and should become Party in 2012. Other accession intentions were publicly made by Mexico and Senegal. There were also positive contacts with other non member States. There was high visibility of the Convention at the annual International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners (Mexico, 2-3 November) as well as in other key international events. Co-operation projects were designed and submitted for funding (Ukraine Joint programme finalised and funding sought for others).

A wide public consultation for the modernisation of Convention 108 was carried out (a total compiled content of over 400 pages from all stakeholders, from around the globe). A first reading of the proposals of modernisation of the Convention was carried out during the 27th Plenary of the Consultative Committee and was subsequently revised in light of the discussions, for finalisation in 2012.

A draft revised Recommendation on the protection of personal data used for employment purposes was produced and discussed. Concerning the recommendation regulating the use of personal data in the police sector, an interim analysis of the 21 replies received to a questionnaire was presented to the Plenary meeting of the Consultative Committee.

Regarding the elaboration and adoption of common positions, at the request of the Committee of Ministers, the Committee of Legal Advisers on Public International Law (CAHDI) commented on the compatibility of Articles 3, 4, 5, 60 and 61 of the draft Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence with international law, including human rights law. The input provided by the CAHDI was crucial to the adoption of this Convention by the Committee of Ministers. At the request of the Steering Committee for Human Rights (CDDH), the CAHDI examined the possibility of introducing a simplified procedure for the amendment of certain provisions of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The CAHDI adopted an opinion on this matter which was transmitted and examined by the Committee of Experts on a Simplified Procedure for Amendment of Certain Provisions of the ECHR.

In the framework of its activity as the European Observatory of Reservations to International Treaties, the CAHDI continued to consider outstanding reservations and declarations to international treaties and the follow-up given to them by the delegations – 33 reservations were considered in 2011 (in 2010 – 25 reservations had been considered).

The CAHDI continued to consider the issue of the accession of the European Union to the ECHR and held an exchange of views on this matter with Mr Jean-Claude Bonichot, judge of the Court of Justice of the European Union at its 41st meeting.

At its 42nd meeting, the CAHDI held an exchange of views on the Preliminary Draft Report of the Secretary General on the Outline of Council of Europe Convention review. The results of these discussions were forwarded to the Secretary General. The issue will be on the agenda of the 43rd meeting of the CAHDI, which will give an opinion on this question.

The CAHDI continued its co-operation with relevant international organisations and bodies, as well as exchange of good practices and information, notably on the issue of national implementation of UN sanctions and respect for human rights, issues of international humanitarian law, as wall as topical issues of international law.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

No voluntary contribution was received to proceed with the development of “effective practical tools to facilitate judicial co-operation in criminal matters” (2010/DGHL/VC 2530).

Discussion during the European Committee on Legal Co-operation (CDCJ) plenary in October and the initial discussions at the Committee of Ministers’ level demonstrated that the Draft recommendation on the rights and legal status of children and parental responsibilities was rather ambitious, as it dealt with controversial issues such as surrogacy arrangements and parental responsibilities of same-sex couples.

The Group of Specialists on the Role of Public Prosecutors outside the criminal field (CJ-S-PR) had to hold a 4th meeting in order to complete the draft recommendation on the role of public prosecutors outside the criminal justice system. At the time of the elaboration of the 2011 Progress review report, the draft explanatory memorandum of the recommendation was still in preparation as in-depth and complex discussions required more time than expected in order to take account of the different legal systems.

Therefore the Group agreed a written procedure for the preparation of the explanatory memorandum to be submitted, together with the draft recommendation to the CDCJ for approval at its plenary meeting in June 2012.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

To ensure the on-going political relevance and consistent impact of activities of the Organisation in the field of criminal law, the working methods of the CDPC will evolve in accordance with future goals and set priorities for 2012 and 2013.

The work of Council of Europe on increasing visibility of data protection has created significant expectations not only by governments, but also other stakeholders (private sector, NGOs). The need for resources is clearly increasing whereas the 2012-2013 budget only covers a minimum threshold of activities which is not commensurate to the potential work concerned.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Convention for the Protection of Individuals with regard to Automatic Processing of Personal Data is the only binding data protection treaty open to any country. Given the development of the Internet and the call for international privacy standards by all stakeholders, there is a window of opportunity to promote it worldwide. Co-operation with other organisations in this field has developed well:

      · European Union: Joint celebration of data protection day (high level event co-organised in Brussels) and close co-operation with the Commission in order to ensure coherence of the modernisation and the European Union legal framework.

      · OECD: regular exchanges and update on the respective review processes.

      · OAS: memorandum of understanding signed which refers to data protection, in particular as OAS is supporting Convention 108 and including it in its comparative study of privacy frameworks.

      · ECOWAS: proposal of co-operation programme of capacity building (funding to be secured).

The CAHDI is a unique forum bringing Legal Advisers to Ministers of Foreign Affairs of all member and observer states of the Council of Europe as well as those of other countries and several international organisations. The CAHDI is co-operating with several organisations in the area of public law.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

2 504

2 350

(124)

2 226

2 212

14

94.1%

99.4%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Effective practical tools to facilitate judicial co-operation in criminal matters.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2530

All member States,
Israel, Brazil, Chile,
Republic of Korea

160

160

   

Development of common standards and policies – Rule of Law.

2010/DGHL/
VC/2544

All member States

100

100

   

COUNTERING THREATS TO THE RULE OF LAW
Corruption – GRECO

“What went well” – tangible results

In 2011 most of the activities were financed through Joint Programmes.

The added value of the Council of Europe in anti-corruption technical assistance was better managed internally (especially in the last quarter of 2011) and better combined externally with the funds and the political pull of partner actors (European Union, EEA/Norway Grants), which resulted in stronger impact of ongoing activities and greatly increased demand for anti-corruption assistance.

The Project against Corruption in Albania (PACA) has delivered a significant part of its expected outputs. There were delays in some areas, where the project had reached the absorption limits of the beneficiary. Therefore PACA will receive a no-cost extension from its initial end-date in March 2012 until end-2012. The good governance/fight against corruption component of the project on Eastern Neighbourhood Partnership Initiative (EaP/Council of Europe Facility), launched in March 2011, was successfully implemented with the full participation of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, the Republic of Moldova and Ukraine.

Negotiations on two Joint projects with the European Union in Turkey: “Ethics” and “Strengthening Anti-corruption Policies” advanced significantly in 2011. An agreement on a Joint project with the European Union against Economic Crime in Kosovo20 (PECK) was signed in December 2011, and implementation will start in February 2012. The negotiations of a Joint Project with the European Union against corruption in Serbia came to the concluding phase and the signing of the agreement is expected in the 1st quarter of 2012.

As part of a new, broader challenge to the Council of Europe, in 2011, the anti-corruption sector assumed the role of Donor Programme Partner (DPP) in the framework of EEA/Norway Grants. This role gives the Organisation access to funds and leverage (comparable to the European Union’s scale) to promote the Council of Europe’s standards in the European Union member States through technical assistance. In the 4th quarter of 2011, the Council of Europe provided advice as DPP and contributed to the design of two projects, in Bulgaria (criminal assets recovery) and the Czech Republic (anti-corruption). Implementation is likely to start in 2012.

Outside Europe, the authorities of Morocco and Tunisia (with European Union support) requested advice and proposals on projects to fight corruption and money laundering. The sector is very much in demand in the framework of the new Council of Europe’s outreach policy to its Southern and Eastern Neighbourhood.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The rapid growth of demand in the sector in 2011 outpaced by far the Organisation’s capacity growth.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Against the general trend of tightening donor budgetary discipline requirements, it will be increasingly difficult to fund from the existing Ordinary Budget allocation project design and project preparation – actions which are necessary prior to attracting extrabudgetary resources. The flexibility to react to ad hoc demands by Council of Europe‘s member States will be reduced to one such request per year.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

Council of Europe’s anti-corruption activities bring together the Organisation’s high-standard reference framework with objective input from its monitoring mechanisms and Council of Europe forums for peer encouragement.

Co-operation with UNODC, OSCE, European Union, IFES and OECD has continued to be a key element in all programme activities and projects carried out during the year.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

439

407

(185)

222

222

54.5%

100.0%

Explanation for variances: 200 K earmarked in the budget as Council of Europe’s share for the funding of several Joint Programmes which were not signed, were allocated to other Joint Programmes on other programme lines.

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Project against corruption in Albania

01/09/2009

31/12/2012

2 000

93.9%

Council of Europe Facility for Eastern Partnership

01/03/2011

31/08/2013

1 110

100.0%

Strengthening democratic reform in the southern Neighbourhood

29/12/2011

28/12/2014

1 052

100.0%

COUNTERING THREATS TO THE RULE OF LAW

… Corruption – GRECO

Enlarged Agreement

Created in 1999

48 members

“What went well” – tangible results

Crucial work for the launch of the Fourth Evaluation Round “Corruption prevention in respect of members of parliament, judges and prosecutors” was completed, including the adoption of a Questionnaire, the compilation of reference materials, the constitution of a pool of evaluators and the training (event supported by Andorra) for plenary representatives, evaluators and the secretariat.

Owing to constructive pressure exercised by GRECO, notable progress was made by two members (Luxembourg and the Slovak Republic) moving them out of non-compliance procedures.

The network of partnerships was extended, in particular, through granting observer status to the Organization of American States (OAS) and the International Anti-Corruption Academy (IACA)

The accession of Belarus became effective in January.

Potential for transversal co-operation with the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE), Congress and EPAS was identified.

Horizontal reviews on both themes of the Third Evaluation Round were prepared highlighting both good practice and weaknesses in the fight against corruption.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Receipt of belated and incomplete information from members has on occasion hindered the sound assessment of the merits of measures taken to implement recommendations – GRECO will maintain a stance of limited tolerance in such situations.

A number of members are experiencing problems in ensuring implementation of recommendations on political funding (Third Round). In this context, the compliance (and non-compliance) procedures are perceived as a constructive impetus for securing change – better involvement of stakeholders (e.g. national parliaments, NGOs) in follow-up is needed.

Since the adoption (June 2011) of the European Commission’s “Anti-Corruption Package” which contains a welcome prospect for European Union participation in GRECO, little discernible progress has been made on the European Union side on a mandate for negotiating the conditions for such participation.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

GRECO recommendations will serve as a main basis for designing capacity building projects and other implementation support measures.

GRECO’s programme of activities for 2012 (transition year between two rounds) takes account of the need to allow sufficient time for the preparation and discussion of the first Fourth Evaluation Round reports which are likely to raise a number of challenging issues. Additional roundtables designed to clarify some of those issues are also included.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

Unlike other anti-corruption mechanisms, GRECO is clearly a multidisciplinary body covering much more than criminal law. It is widely acknowledged that with its recent focus on political financing and coming focus on members of parliament and the judiciary, GRECO is breaking new ground and responding to growing concerns in member States.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

2 168

12

2 180

2 109

71

97.3%

96.7%

Receipts

2 168

12

2 180

2 180

 

100.6%

100.0%

Contributions of
member States

2 168

 

2 168

2 168

 

100.0%

100.0%

Other receipts

 

12

12

12

   

100.0%

COUNTERING THREATS TO THE RULE OF LAW

Organised crime and terrorism

“What went well” – tangible results

MONEYVAL’s programme of activities in its 4th round of evaluations was successfully implemented in 2011. Of the 30 jurisdictions evaluated by MONEYVAL, 22 were subject to active monitoring processes, either through onsite visits, adoption of reports or detailed follow up. MONEYVAL’s Compliance Enhancing Procedures (CEPs) continued in 2011 to deliver important results in a timely manner. In the case of the Republic of Moldova CEPs were immediately invoked as a result of urgent plenary concerns about the reporting regime. A MONEYVAL high level mission to the country was rapidly organised. This led to quick legislative amendments which ensured the continuity of the anti-money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) preventive regime, thus removing a potentially serious global AML/CFT threat.

The important role MONEYVAL plays globally was highlighted by the President of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) in his December visit when he publicly commended MONEYVAL for the quality of its robust follow up procedures which achieve real results.

The international reputation of MONEYVAL was further highlighted by the application in 2011 of the Holy See (including Vatican City state) to be assessed by MONEYVAL. An onsite visit took place in November to the Vatican and the report will be discussed in 2012.

In March 2011 MONEYVAL published a full horizontal review of the state of compliance of all MONEYVAL countries at the end of the 3rd round of evaluations. This document draws together the major challenges countries still face in implementing the global standards and was well received externally. It is a valuable training tool for MONEYVAL countries and has been influential in the further development of the global standards.

Additionally, MONEYVAL successfully organised an important typologies meeting in Israel launching two major new research projects.

The third Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime and on the Financing of Terrorism (COP) was held in March. This meeting resulted in the adoption of the first COP report on Albania, assessing those areas of the Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime and on the Financing of Terrorism that add value to the international standards. Though the report is not based on an onsite visit, the experience of holding a face-to-face meeting with the country before the COP discussion ensured that the report was deepened and consequently of greater quality.

As far as the counter-terrorism activities are concerned, the Council of Europe hosted in Strasbourg the “Special Meeting of the United Nations Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee with International, Regional and Subregional Organizations”. This was the first time in its history that the Council of Europe hosted a meeting of a committee of the Security Council and a unique opportunity to disseminate information, to raise awareness on many activities and actions that the Council of Europe is taking to prevent and combat terrorism and to protect its victims, and to reaffirm the Council of Europe’s leading role in the development of the international prevention of terrorism as this Special Meeting was devoted to the theme of “Prevention of Terrorism”.

Furthermore, on 16-17 June 2011 the Council of Europe Counter Terrorism Task Force organised a joint Conference in San Sebastian (Spain) with the Counter Terrorism Committee of the Organization of American States and the Spanish authorities. This conference was devoted to the “Victims of Terrorism” taking into account on the one hand the extensive legal acquis of the Council of Europe in this field and on the other hand the vary wide range of legal instruments and policies that Spain has developed. The results of this Conference will also be very useful for the follow-up of Article 13 of the Council of Europe Convention on the Prevention of Terrorism [CETS No. 196], devoted to the victims of terrorism.

The Council of Europe Counter Terrorism Task Force continued to develop its technical assistance Project “Bringing Terrorists to Justice”, designed as a series of workshops aimed at discussing the achievements and obstacles as well as the methods which have been employed by prosecutors and judges in order to meet the challenges of bringing terrorists to justice. In this respect, the International Conference on “Bringing Terrorists to Justice” was organized by the Counter Terrorism Task Force in co-operation with the Security Service of Ukraine.

The technical assistance was better managed internally (especially in the last quarter of 2011) and better combined externally with the funds and the political pull of partner actors (European Union, EEA/Norway Grants). This resulted in a stronger impact and a greatly increased demand for Council of Europe’s anti-corruption assistance.

In Serbia, a newly launched Joint project with the European Union (MOLI-Serbia) and the on-going project on Confiscation and Asset Recovery (CAR-Serbia) provided assistance to the authorities in improving relevant legislation and practice.

In response to ad hoc requests, urgent reviews of changes (including constitutional issues) related to the AML/CFT legal frameworks in the Republic of Moldova, Montenegro and Albania resulted in improved alignment of new draft laws (Republic of Moldova, Montenegro) and draft secondary legislation (Albania) with Council of Europe and global standards.

The design and drafting of a Training Manual on Economic Crime and Good Governance for a pilot training in Russia in May 2012 started in the 4th quarter of 2011.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The greater demands made on the MONEYVAL secretariat with the accession of the Holy See meant that there was insufficient staff resource to hold a second COP report in 2011. The Council of Europe's and MONEYVAL's strong market position in AML/CFT will be difficult to sustain in the longer term without more permanent expertise in the secretariat for MONEYVAL and the COP.

For co-operation activities, the available technical knowledge of the AML/CFT standards and limited project design capacity were a problem highlighted by the exponential growth of demand in 2011 (Norway Grants, South Facility, Neighbourhood Initiative).

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Operational appropriations have been redeployed to this programme line in the Programme and Budget 2012-2013 amounting to €70 K in 2012 and to €100 K in 2013. Nevertheless, no additional staff have been allocated to this programme.

The 2011 counter-terrorism activities paved the way for the main activities to be developed in the counter-terrorism field. First of all, 2012-2013 will be devoted to monitor the implementation of the Council of Europe Convention on the Prevention of Terrorism [CETS No. 196] by the Parties. Secondly, the CODEXTER will continue intergovernmental activities that involve examination of lacunae in international law and action against terrorism, and in particular, will continue its work on national coordinating bodies in the field of the fight against terrorism. Thirdly, the Council of Europe Counter Terrorism Division will continue to develop – on the basis of 2011 activities – its co-operation activities.

Concerning the assistance, the EaP/Council of Europe Facility (since March 2011), a new project on criminal assets recovery (Bulgaria, under Norway Grants) as well as the limited intervention provided through the South Neighbourhood Policy (Tunisia and Morocco) will allow for interventions in some 10 countries.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

MONEYVAL is a critically important and respected global partner of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), IMF, World Bank, the European Union and the United Nations in AML/CFT issues. Under the umbrella of the FATF, MONEYVAL co chairs the Europe Eurasia Regional Review Group, thus playing a significant role in responding in the European context to the G20 global call to identify potentially high risk jurisdictions. MONEYVAL also made a direct contribution in 2011 to the revised global AML/CFT standards to be promulgated in February 2012. The MONEYVAL partnership with the IMF means that the IMF accept MONEYVAL reports as the AML/CFT components of their wider financial sector assessments in MONEYVAL countries. Under agreed burden sharing arrangements between MONEYVAL and the IMF, the Fund conducted one onsite visit on MONEYVAL’s behalf in 2011, with MONEYVAL providing the expertise on the European Union 3rd Directive issues. MONEYVAL remains the only global body that assesses aspects of European Union AML/CFT standards in its onsite visits, and thus MONEYVAL reports are also highly valued by the European Union.

The comprehensive Convention CETS 198 adds value to the existing global and regional standards, as it contains important new legal, law enforcement and international co-operation provisions, which can enhance national AML/CFT defences, and improve international co-operation on AML/CFT and asset recovery.

The Council of Europe’s contribution in the area of counter-terrorism activities is widely recognised internationally as the Council of Europe Convention on the Prevention of Terrorism was the first international legally binding instrument on this subject. This Convention has served as inspiration for other international texts such as United Nations Security Council Resolution 1624 (2005) and the revised European Union Framework Decision on combating terrorism as well as the recent United Nations Security Council Resolution 1963 (2010).

Regarding the co-operation with the OSCE, the Council of Europe and the OSCE, which have already set up a “Co-ordination Group” on the issue of terrorism, held the 14th meeting of the said Group on 21 October 2011 in Vienna. In this regard, the co-operation between the OSCE and the Council of Europe in the area of the fight against terrorism was further enhanced and developed with an aim to amplify the political message as well as legal and operational action against terrorism. Recent years of co-operation between the OSCE and the Council of Europe on the fight against terrorism also revealed an expansion of co-operation into new areas such as the promotion of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the fight against terrorism, the role of the media in preventing and combating terrorism, countering terrorist use of the Internet and enhancing cyber security.

In addition in 2011, the Council of Europe was for the first time invited to deliver a presentation to the European Union Working Party on Terrorism (COTER) and was also invited to a NATO debriefing on the Council of Europe’s action against terrorism. Furthermore, during the 80th General Assembly Session of Interpol, the Council of Europe was also represented with a key-note speaker.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

2 246

2 125

12

2 137

2 129

8

100.2%

99.6%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Capacity Building of the Directorate for Confiscated Property and Improving the System for Criminal Asset Confiscation (CAR)

01/04/2010

31/03/2013

2 000

93.5%

Project against Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing in Serbia

15/11/2010

14/11/2013

2 000

90.9%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Bringing terrorists to justice: promoting the implementation of European standards and documenting good practices.

2010/DLAPIL/
VC/2425

All member States

382

100

   

Anti-money laundering and financing of terrorism monitoring mechanism (MONEYVAL).

2011/DGHL/
VC/2558

All member States,
Canada,
Holy See,
Israel,
Japan,
Mexico,
United States,
European Union,
OSCE,
United Nations

1 500

360

299

Monaco, Russian Federation,
Holy See,
United States

Supporting the Mechanism for Monitoring the Implementation of the Council of Europe Convention CETS n° 198.

2009/DGHL/
VC/2030

All member States,
Canada,
Holy See,
Japan,
Mexico,
United States,
European Union

623

150

   

COUNTERING THREATS TO THE RULE OF LAW

Internet Security and Cybercrime

“What went well” – tangible results

The Cybercrime Convention Committee (T-CY) has become fully operational. In November 2011, it adopted a workplan for 2012-2013, established an ad-hoc sub-group to work on an instrument on transborder access to data and jurisdiction, initiated an assessment of the implementation of the Budapest Convention on Cybercrime by the Parties and engaged in close co-operation with the capacity building programmes of the Council of Europe.

The Budapest Convention on Cybercrime received strong political support in 2011. The Council of Europe was active and visible in international cybercrime policies. The main highlights of 2011 were: the Octopus and 10th anniversary conference (November), the high-level conference organised by the Hungarian Presidency of the European Union (April), the joint letter by Deputy Secretary General and Commissioner of the European Union urging ratification of the Convention (June), the Council of Europe participation in United Nations meetings (January and April) and in the London Conference on Cyberspace (November).

The technical co-operation projects supported capacity building worldwide:

    · Since its launch in March 2009 the Global Project on Cybercrime (Phase 2) was successfully completed through more than 150 activities. In 2011, it contributed to the strengthening of co-operation between India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in cybercrime matters, supported legislative reform in the Pacific region, Africa and Latin America, helping the strengthening criminal justice capacities in all regions of the world.

    · Through the CyberCrime@IPA joint regional project of the European Union in South-eastern Europe and the new Cybercrime@EAP project under the Eastern Partnership Facility, the implementation of the Budapest Convention and related standards and practices was supported in 14 European countries and areas.

As a result of the refocusing of activities by the Organisation, the action against cybercrime is now embedded in the broader strategy of the Council of Europe on Internet governance and the capacity of the Council of Europe to support action against cybercrime worldwide is streamlined.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Differing views of T-CY and CDPC regarding procedures for accession to the Budapest Convention (and other criminal law treaties) in 2011 make it more difficult to turn this treaty into a global instrument.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

A substantial increase of the number of Parties to the Budapest Convention in 2012 would be crucial in order to offset calls for a new United Nations treaty on cybercrime. Such a treaty is likely to establish substantially lower standards than the Budapest Convention while undermining its potential to be the better global instrument.

Council of Europe added value and co-operation with other organisations

The Budapest Convention on Cybercrime is the only international legally binding instrument in this field. The Council of Europe co-operates with some 120 countries to support its implementation. Combined with its multi-stakeholder and rule of law / human rights-based approach and its related standards – in particular Data Protection Convention 108 – the Council of Europe is in a unique position to provide added value. The Internet Governance Strategy 2012-2015 should allow the Council of Europe to make better use of this potential.

Under its multi-stakeholder approach the Council of Europe co-operates closely with the European Union, the G8, the United Nations (including UN Office on Drugs and Crime), Interpol, Europol, the Virtual Global Task Force, and a wide range of other public organisations and the private sector, in particular Microsoft.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

455

425

56

481

480

1

112.9%

99.8%

Explanation for variances: Additional 20 K which were not earmarked in the Budget were granted as Council of Europe’s share for the funding of the Joint programme "Project on Cybercrime in South-Eastern Europe".

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Regional Cooperation in Criminal Justice : Strengthening capacities in the fight against cybercrime – South-East Europe

01/11/2010

31/10/2012

2 500

90.0%

Council of Europe Facility for Eastern Partnership

01/03/2011

31/08/2013

709

100.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Project on Cybercrime, Phase 2.

2009/DGHL/
VC/2079

All member States,
Multilateral

1 400

165

372

Estonia, Monaco, Japan, Others (McAfee, Microsoft®)

DEMOCRACY

PARLIAMENTARY DEMOCRACY
Parliamentary Assembly

During its four part-sessions in 2011, the Parliamentary Assembly discussed 84 reports and adopted 115 texts (42 Recommendations, 71 Resolutions and two Opinions). The Assembly’s 10 Committees met at 83 plenary meetings, 10 of which were held outside Strasbourg or Paris.

In January 2011, the Assembly debated a report on the investigation of allegations of inhuman treatment of people and illicit trafficking in human organs in Kosovo21 with wide media coverage. Several reports on the reconciliation process in the Balkan region and important reports on Belarus and on the implementation of judgments of the European Court of Human Rights (the Court) were also debated.

The debate on the religious dimension of intercultural dialogue, in April 2011, proposed to create, within the Council of Europe, a new platform for an ongoing dialogue on this question.

In the context of the Assembly’s neighbouring policy and developments in the Arab world, the Assembly had important debates on the situation in Tunisia and in the Arab World. It also granted Partner for Democracy status to the Moroccan Parliament (June 2011) and to the Palestinian National Council (October 2011). It received a request for such status from the parliament of Kyrgyzstan.

In order to strengthen its political relevance, effectiveness and visibility, the Assembly adopted in June 2011 a report concerning its internal reform and also debated the progress of the Assembly’s monitoring procedure.

In October 2011, the Assembly, debating on the impact of the Lisbon treaty on the Council of Europe, called for a common space for human rights protection across the continent.

Several other Assembly debates had a wide media impact, such as the report on prenatal sex selection.

In line with the Assembly’s responsibility for the election of judges to the Court, elections of judges in respect of France, Norway, Portugal and Switzerland took place in the course of 2011.

Several leading political personalities addressed the Assembly, namely the President and Prime Minister of Turkey, the Presidents of Armenia, Serbia, Romania and Ukraine, as well as the President of the Palestinian National Authority and the Ministers for Foreign Affairs of Turkey, Ukraine and Bulgaria.

Furthermore, the Assembly awarded the Human Rights Prize to the Russian NGO “Committee against Torture”, in recognition of its key role in assisting victims of serious human rights abuses, and its European Prize to the Cities of Hünfeld (Germany) and Landernau (France).

Finally, the Assembly observed elections in the following member States: Bulgaria, Russian Federation, “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”, Turkey as well as in the non member States Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tunisia and Morocco. The observation of elections involved 142 members of parliamentary delegations from 34 member States and representing the five political groups22 of the Assembly.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

14 817

14 817

(6)

14 811

14 787

24

99.8%

99.8%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Democracy Support Programme – Republic of Moldova

04/01/2010

03/01/2012

421

100.0%

PARLIAMENTARY DEMOCRACY

Elections and Implementation of States’ Commitments

“What went well” – tangible results

The pre-electoral Action Plans to support local elections in Albania and the Republic of Moldova were well received by the competent authorities who supported their implementation. These Action Plans had, to varying degrees, a positive impact on the conduct of elections in the countries concerned.

The Council of Europe is increasingly recognised as a crucial partner in the electoral field by national authorities and other International Organisations, and as such regularly consulted and associated to the conduct of the electoral process in some of the member States. There is an increasing demand for Council of Europe co-operation in electoral support not only in connection with specific electoral deadlines, including local elections, but also in relation to more general programmes intended to build the capacity of identified member States to run an electoral process in compliance with European standards. In particular in Bosnia and Herzegovina activities concerning voters awareness related to first time voters in high schools and improvement of legal framework and electoral processes were implemented. This was also supported by the launch of a new project related to electoral assistance in Bosnia and Herzegovina, with the funding of USAID, in order to strengthen the role of women and young politicians in public and political life in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The electoral component of the Eastern Partnership (EaP) was also launched, aiming at better preparing electoral administrations to fulfil their tasks; enhance the NGOs’ role as critical electoral observers and increased participation of voters in the democratic processes. With regard to NGOs, the co-operation with local representatives of civil society continued to develop considerably, and became a fundamental tool for spreading Council of Europe principles and democratic standards in the organisation, monitoring and coverage of elections among citizens.

All programmes benefitted largely from additional extra-budgetary resources, notably from member and observer states as well as the Eastern Partnership Facility.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The programme heavily relied on voluntary contributions. The work plan was sometimes affected by the delays in the availability of such contributions rather than being based on the requirements of elections dates.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Countries where an Action Plan was implemented in the past, asked for continuous assistance in this field, based on the more long term needs identified during the pre-electoral Action Plans.

Reinforced co-operation with the Council of Europe is envisaged in those fields identified as requiring further efforts by the countries.

Reinforced and better relations between elections monitoring, country specific assistance and co-operation should allow the Council of Europe to respond more adequately to the Committee of Ministers’ decisions.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The conduct of free and fair elections is a fundamental feature of democracy. The Council of Europe has standards to offer and norms for their implementation. In particular, the Venice Commission has the necessary expertise in this field to provide authoritative advice to member States. Co-operation with the Council of Europe with a view to fulfilling its obligations and commitments help countries to reinforce domestically the rule of law, democracy and human rights for the benefit of its citizens. The assessment provided by the Committee of Ministers is essential for a better and more targeted approach of the Council of Europe in terms of bilateral and country specific co-operation.

Norms and standards of the Council of Europe and the assessment of their implementation are essential for European Union integration perspectives and agendas of the countries and the fulfilment of the Copenhagen criteria.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

665

608

(78)

530

496

34

81.6%

93.6%

Explanation for variances: 50 K earmarked in the budget as the Council of Europe share for the funding of a Joint Programme which was not signed were allocated to another programme line. 15 K were redeployed to the programme line "Addressing Post Conflict situations".

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Council of Europe Facility for Eastern Partnership

01/03/2011

31/08/2013

908

100.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Electoral Assistance.

2011/DGDPA/
VC/2533

All member
states

3 000

3 000

80

Austria,
Germany

LOCAL DEMOCRACY
Congress of Local and Regional Authorities

In 2011 the Congress implemented the reform, started in 2010, of its structures, functioning, working methods and activities, so as to adopt a more operational, more practical, more concrete and more result-oriented approach.

The Congress enhanced the monitoring of the implementation of the European Charter of Local Self-Government (ECLSG). It fielded 12 visits to nine countries (France, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Lithuania, Czech Republic, Republic of Moldova, Germany, Italy, Portugal and "the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”). It also adopted nine recommendations on the monitoring of local and regional democracy in Romania, Malta, Turkey, Austria, Slovenia, Bulgaria, Finland, Latvia and Serbia. This strengthening has allowed the Congress to enter into more substantial and more targeted dialogue with authorities in the countries concerned, and the first results of these efforts can already be seen. For example, the monitoring report on Austria triggered a debate about federalism in the country, and in June the Austrian parliament amended legislation as a direct implementation of three concrete Congress recommendations. Also as a result of monitoring, the Estonian government has renewed its dialogue with local authorities, and Slovenia ratified the Additional Protocol to the Self-Government Charter on citizen participation.

Over the same period, the Congress observed local elections in Albania, in the Republic of Moldova and in Bulgaria. The observation delegations included also members of the European Union Committee of the Regions. Under the new rules of procedure for election observation, all observation missions are now preceded by pre-electoral visits, which allow a broader observation including the organisation of the elections, the financing and the role of the media.

As a follow-up to the recommendations stemming from its monitoring and election observation missions, the Congress proposed co-operation activities with the countries willing to take advantage of its experience and expertise. These activities aim at strengthening local and regional democracy. In Albania, for example, the Congress proposed, on the basis of the conclusions of a seminar organised in Tirana with the support of the Swiss authorities, to try to bridge the existing political divide between local elected representatives of different political parties, following the local elections in May 2011.

In 2011 the Congress also strengthened the dialogue with member States and the Committee of Ministers. The Congress is committed to encouraging member States to review and possibly lift reservations they made to the ECLSG, so as to create a really unified European Space of common standards for local democracy.

In addition the Congress progressed in promoting human rights as a major element of local democracy and raising the awareness of elected representatives about human rights respect and implementation at local level, by adopting a resolution on identifying human rights indicators at local and regional levels.

The Congress took a specific action with regard to the social inclusion of Roma organising a Summit of mayors on Roma, in Strasbourg on 22 September. The Summit brought together almost 400 participants, representatives of local and regional authorities and of associations and networks, who pledged their commitment to pursue their activities at the grassroots and took the very concrete decision to establish a European Alliance of Cities and Regions for Roma inclusion.

Moreover, the Congress reinforced, notably via co-operation agreements, co-operation with the two European organisations representing regions with legislative power (REGLEG and CALRE).

The year’s other highlights included a reinforced co-operation with the European Union, in particular with the Committee of the Regions as regards the issue of integrity and fight against corruption at local and regional level and the Fundamental Rights Agency, and the activities in the framework of the European Local Democracy Week (ELDW).

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

6 312

6 312

13

6 325

6 202

123

98.3%

98.1%

LOCAL DEMOCRACY

Local Governance

“What went well” – tangible results

The impact of economic downturn on local government remained high on member States’ agenda and received sustained attention. A second mid-term review conference was held in Strasbourg, the report on the situation was thoroughly updated – with the participation of external partners (CEMR, OSI/LGI) and institutions (OECD) – thus enabling European ministers at their Council of Europe Conference in Kyiv (3-4 November 2011) to adopt revised guidelines on how to tackle the crisis.

Capacity-building activities reached a peak in terms both of programmes implemented (32) and beneficiary countries (19).

Further signatures and ratifications were recorded to the two conventions: CETS No 206 (two additional signatures and two additional ratifications) and 207 (two additional signatures and two additional ratifications).

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The proposal for a partnership between the Ministerial conference and the Committee of Ministers on the Council of Europe’s agenda for local democracy was not accepted. A debate took place in the Committee of Ministers on the work of the Council of Europe on local and regional democracy, leading to thoroughly revised terms of reference for the European Committee on Local and Regional Democracy (CDLR). The United Kingdom Chairmanship of the Committee of Ministers launched a reflection on possible reforms of the programme, budget and secretariat entrusted with local and regional democracy.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The terms of reference of the CDLR have been streamlined and both staff and budgetary appropriations for 2012 have been reduced. Further work on topics identified at the ministerial conference is dependent on Committee of Ministers’ decisions. The results of the United Kingdom initiative will be available in the course of 2012 and have an impact, if the Committee of Ministers so decides, from 2013 on.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Council of Europe remains the only European organisation where the issues of local government and impact of the crisis are debated. The enhanced co-operation with OECD in the run up to the Kyiv ministerial conference confirmed this perception.

In the field of capacity building, the partnership with the UNDP Regional Centre for Europe and CIS continues and is very important.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

2 398

2 192

(162)

2 030

1 953

77

89.1%

96.2%

Explanation for variances: Due to a post vacancy during several months, assistance activities could not be implemented as foreseen. Moreover, in the intergovernmental field, two meetings of the CDLR were cancelled as priority was given to the Kyiv ministerial conference.

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Strengthening Local Self Government in Serbia (Phase II)

29/04/2009

30/04/2012

2 000

90.9%

Strengthening local self-government in Montenegro (Phase II)

01/09/2009

30/06/2011

200

80.0%

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY
Addressing Post-Conflict Situations

“What went well” – tangible results

A programme of specific co-operation activities for the Chechen Republic of the Russian Federation was implemented in the areas of building local democratic institutions and human rights. Participants in the activities gave positive feedback on the seminars organised by the Council of Europe and on the value of sharing information amongst themselves and with external experts.

Confidence Building Measures (CBM) continued to be implemented in the Transnistria region of the Republic of Moldova, and in the areas affected by the conflict in Georgia targeting different professional groups and civil society. Notably, programmes for ombudspersons, journalists, civil society, young people and doctors in the Transnistria region of the Republic of Moldova and for journalists, university students and teachers from the areas affected by the conflict in Georgia were implemented in spite of the political tensions and logistical difficulties. These events represented an important contribution from the Council of Europe to the support of the on-going dialogues for the political solution of the tensions.

A relationship of trust could be developed with the participants who will enable the Council of Europe to further initiatives of confidence-building measures with these regions.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Due to the will of certain leaders in the Transnistrian region of the Republic of Moldova, not all projects related to CBMs could be implemented, notably in relation to some pillars, such as education and youth. Recent changes lead to believe that implementation will be possible in 2012.

As financing comes largely from extra-budgetary resources, in spite of some voluntary contributions made available by member States, not all requests in this respect could be positively followed-up because of the limited amount of resources and also late funding.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Proposals for wider and deeper programmes from the different target groups received the political support of the authorities and, if resources are available, could be implemented in 2012-2013 and beyond.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

CBMs and specific post-conflict co-operation activities are a fundamental complement and support to the dialogue in the regions in question that is ongoing at the political level both within the Council of Europe and outside the Council of Europe with its participation. The issues raised are central for the respect of human rights in the regions concerned.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

537

491

(34)

457

454

3

92.5%

99.3%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Promoting the CoE "Academy of political Studies" concept in Cyprus

28/08/2007

28/05/2011

600

85.7%

Democracy Support Programme – Republic of Moldova

04/01/2010

03/01/2012

1 767

100.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Addressing Post-Conflict Situations.

2011/DGDPA/
VC/2536

All member
states

2 000

2 000

533

Liechtenstein,
Romania,
United States

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

Good Governance, Internet and Media

“What went well” – tangible results

Standard setting activities were implemented successfully, advancing considerably the implementation of The Reykjavik Ministerial Conference proposals and the related decisions of the Committee of Ministers.

In particular, the Committee of Ministers adopted five instruments, namely Declarations on Internet governance principles and on human rights aspects of Internet domain names and name strings, on human rights aspects of privately operated Internet platforms, and Recommendations on state responsibilities for the ongoing functioning of Internet infrastructures and on a new notion of media.

Several of these instruments were welcomed by the European Union, the World Bank, the OSCE and other organisations and by a range of private sector and civil society actors. Additional instruments on public service media governance, on libel tourism, on social networks and on search engines were completed and submitted to the Committee of Ministers for adoption. Work is very advanced on the revision of certain existing media related standards to incorporate a gender perspective into them.

The Council of Europe built considerable multi-stakeholder consensus around its work. Some of the abovementioned instruments were developed following innovative multi-stakeholder processes and were broadly discussed – e.g. during a dedicated conference (Strasbourg, April 2011) and at the European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG – Belgrade, June 2011) and the global UN-led Internet Governance Forum (IGF – Nairobi, Sept. 2011).

A draft 2012-2015 Council of Europe Internet governance strategy was finalised following a conference hosted by Austria to discuss the strategy, Freedom of expression and of the Internet.

There was strong Council of Europe’s participation in the 6th Internet governance forum (IGF), and the 4th European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG) was co-organised by the Council of Europe; The Council of Europe’s human rights messages had great resonance in both events. The Council of Europe has been widely acknowledged as an important player of Internet governance.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

While activities on child online safety have not led to specific outputs in 2011, they have been integrated into the longer term children’s and Internet governance strategies of the Council of Europe.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The 15 December 2011 Committee of Ministers’ thematic debate led to calls for follow-up work in respect of various 2011 tangible results (new notion of media; internet governance instruments) or earlier deliverables (implementation of the Committee of Ministers Declaration of 13 January 2010).

The 2012-2015 Council of Europe’s-wide Internet Governance Strategy is a direct result of activities under this programme. Responsibility for overall coordination of the implementation of the strategy has been assigned to the Steering Committee on Media and Information Society (CDMSI).

The gender equality approach adopted within this area of work had a bearing both on substantive aspects of the 2012-2013 programme (e.g. gender equality and media, including in the context of coverage of election campaigns) and structural arrangements (e.g. gender equality rapporteurs included in the terms of reference of every steering committee).

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Council of Europe activities in the Internet and media fields are widely acknowledged especially by Intergovernmental organisations (e.g. World Bank, OSCE), Civil Society Organisations (which inter alia expressed a preference for the Council of Europe’s Internet governance principles compared to those prepared by the OECD) and the private sector. Similarly, the European Union expressed its support and encouraged the pursuit of this work.

The Council of Europe is a key player and in great demand due to its standard setting and networking (multi-stakeholder) work in respect of EuroDIG and the UN-led Internet Governance Forum. There have been repeated calls that the Council of Europe live up to its promises as regards secretariat support for the EuroDIG.

The Council of Europe has been the only organisation bringing a human rights dimension to discussions of the Governmental Advisory Committee of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (GAC-ICANN). It has been a regular guest and speaker at events organised by other organisations (UNESCO, OSCE, EC-European Union-EP) and has also been closely associated to member States’ initiatives (Sweden, Austria, Netherlands) which also flow into other international organisations (e.g. UN Human Rights Council). The European Union has deposited the accession instrument to the European Convention on the Legal Protection of Services based on, or consisting of, Conditional Access and a negotiating mandate is under preparation for a neighbouring rights convention to be worked out within a Council of Europe framework; the Council of Europe has been a regular participant in EC-led meetings of the Contact Committee on audiovisual media services.

Finally, the private sector often expresses its support for Council of Europe work, engages in talks (Skype, Google, Facebook, Microsoft) or participates in activities organised by the Council of Europe. Google has promoted Council of Europe work and has requested its presence in a dedicated event co-organised with the European Parliament.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 778

1 652

56

1 708

1 702

6

103.0%

99.6%

Extrabudgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Promotion of European Standards in the Ukrainian Media Environment

01/09/2008

31/12/2012

2 489

89.9%

Democracy Support Programme –
Republic of Moldova

04/01/2010

03/01/2012

344

100.0%

Promoting freedom, professionalism and pluralism of the media in the South Caucasus and Republic of Moldova

01/01/2011

31/12/2012

750

68.2%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG – the European IGF).

2011/DGHL/
VC/2511

All member States, Baltic states, Caucasian countries, South-East Europe, European Union, OSCE, UN

106

106

   

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

Civil society – Non-Governmental Organisations

“What went well” – tangible results

The Forum for the Future of Democracy (FFD) with the theme “Interdependence of Democracy and Social Cohesion” provided timely opportunity to signal the risks for democracy of weakening social cohesion through stringent austerity measures. The Forum’s transversal nature provided exceptional opportunity for politicians, civil society, academics and civil servants to exchange their views on topics relevant to all groups. The ‘quadrilogue’ executive management of the Forum enabled all major Council of Europe stakeholders to be involved in the event.

The Conference of international non-governmental organisations (INGOs) reformed its structures and took a more proactive role. It supported Council of Europe priority areas such as the implementation of the recommendations of the report of the Group of Eminent Persons on living together in the 21st century. The two Civil Society Forums were open to NGOs not members of the Conference of INGOs in keeping with the Secretary General’s wish for the Council of Europe to open up to different NGOs, including NGOs from the Southern Mediterranean.

The Code of Good Practice for civil participation in the decision-making process served as guideline in at least three countries and was translated into 12 languages in 2011. The Expert Council on NGO Law changed its working method and now deals also with country specific issues.

The three-year Co-operation programme in the Russian Federation was concluded successfully.

Proposals for civil society activities in Belarus were met with interest by donors.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Not all member States’ authorities were represented at the Forum and the level of representation of those who did attend was not always very high. Media impact was essentially limited to host country press. How to promote the outcomes of events such as the Forum remains a problem. The current methods, including through the GR-DEM, do not yield satisfactory results and need to be reviewed.

The promotion of the Code of Good Practice could not be pursued as actively as foreseen due to lack of resources.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The existing format of the FFD will be discontinued in 2012, which will see the first session of the Strasbourg World Forum for Democracy. In order to build on the experience of the FFD there could be run-up or follow-up events to the World Forum outside Strasbourg. One possibility could be to use the Schools of Political Studies to host or co-host such events in their respective countries.

The reduction in the number of sessions of the Conference of INGOs from four to two per year allowed resources to be used for the organisation of the Civil Society Forum in Strasbourg in November 2011 which can be seen as a “trial run” for next year’s civil society debate during the Strasbourg World Forum for Democracy.

The evaluation of the three-Year Programme in the Russian Federation will help to shape the follow-up for 2012.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The value added of Council of Europe key events is the multi-stakeholder approach and the participation of international institutions and organisations such as European Union and the OSCE.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 907

1 742

269

2 011

1 955

56

112.2%

97.2%

Explanation for variances: In accordance with the decision of the Committee of Ministers when adopting the 2011 Programme and Budget, 100 K were redeployed from general management expenditure to this programme line for activities relating to the Conference of INGOs. Moreover, this programme (Forum for the future of democracy) was reinforced by redeploying resources amounting to 50 K from the programme "Protecting the Rights of the Vulnerable (Elderly)".

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Strengthening civil society and independent media in Belarus.

2011/DGDPA/
VC/2611

Belarus

840

400

160

Germany,
Poland,
Romania

Network of the Schools of Political Studies.

2011/DGDPA/
VC/2572

Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Republic of Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russian Federation, Serbia, ''the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia'', Ukraine, Caucasian countries, South-East Europe, Belarus, Kosovo23

700

700

200

Switzerland

School of Local Democracy in the Western Balkans.

2010/DGDPA/
VC/2359

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia, ''the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia''

100

100

106

Liechtenstein, Japan

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

Promoting a Socially Cohesive and Sustainable Society – Secretariat of the Council of Europe Development Bank

“What went well” – tangible results

At the end of 2011 the Council of Europe of Social Cohesion Action Plan of the Council Europe was already implemented in 11 member States, mainly at local level, involving 46 cities. In five member States (Portugal, Romania, Luxembourg, Sweden, Latvia) the national level is as well involved (either through the Ministry of Social Affairs as in Portugal or Romania, the national association of local and regional authorities as in Sweden and in Latvia or other national organisation in Luxembourg). In Belgium the action plan is implemented in all Wallonia Region (2/3 of the municipalities have an action plan for social cohesion, which will be evaluated using the Council of Europe Action Plan proposed approach) thanks to a strong co-operation with Wallonia Region since the first strategy of social cohesion of the Council of Europe. The results of these processes is a database of about 80 000 criteria of well-being/ill-being expressed by citizens in different places of Europe and a synthetic framework allowing evaluation of impact of any policies from these criteria. Another result is the methodology to develop social cohesion at local level itself, named SPIRAL methodology. This methodology which is presented in the methodological guidebook published in 2010 (“involving citizens and communities in societal progress toward well-being of all”) has been improved during 2011, namely for elaboration of concerted local action plans for social cohesion. One of its applications is a shared social responsibility approach for combating poverty, experimented in five pilot cities during 2011 in the framework of the project “Human Rights and Poverty” in co-operation with the European Union, resulting in the confirmation of the interest of this participatory approach and the possibility to spread it in a much larger number of cities in 2012-2013.

The CoE-EU joint conference on Social Shared Responsibilities (SSR) took place in Brussels (400 participants from 42 countries) where the Secretary General of the Council of Europe along with the President Barroso and Commissioner Andor highlighted the importance of SSR as a response to the crisis. During this event, a publication Trends in Social Cohesion No. 23 on SSR was widely distributed. As a contribution to the second Ministerial conference on Social Cohesion, Trends in social cohesion n° 22 was devoted to “Rethinking progress and ensuring a secure future for all: what we can learn from the crisis”. A new joint programme was signed with the EU on “Facilitating youth transition to active life” and an interactive platform of open dialogue was set, allowing youth in transition to express their views and experiences as inputs for policy-makers.

The Guide “Constructing an inclusive institutional culture: intercultural competences in social services” was published and widely distributed to social services dealing with pluricultural realities.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The main encountered difficulty was the increasing number of solicitations to apply the Council of Europe Social Cohesion Action Plan, namely coming from municipalities, implying increasing needs for training, technical support and follow up. To overcome this difficulty the collaborative website SPIRAL was reinforced and will be developed in a more collaborative way during 2012.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Follow-up will be given to the draft recommendation on the Council of Europe Charter on shared social responsibilities, which is an important tool for innovative future work aiming to ensure social cohesion in Europe.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The transversal approach used, which was considered as fundamental to social cohesion by the High Level Task Force, certainly represent an added value for the implementation of activities in this domain. A particularly fruitful co-operation has been taking place for several years with the European Commission.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 269

1 114

65

1 179

1 167

12

104.8%

99.0%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Census Observation

15/05/2006

15/12/2011

595

67.3%

Partnership agreement 2010 "A Europe of shared social responsibilities"

01/01/2010

02/03/2011

350

77.6%

Human rights of people in poverty

01/05/2010

30/04/2012

629

80.2%

Partnership agreement ‘Europe of welfare for all’

01/08/2011

31/07/2012

300

75.0%

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

…Promoting a Socially Cohesive and Sustainable Society – Secretariat of the Council of Europe Development Bank

Partial Agreement

Created in 1956

40 members

“What went well” – tangible results

Project admissibility opinions prepared by the Secretariat and signed by the Secretary General on 36 loan requests, together with the Governor’s reports, allowed the Administrative Council of the Council of Europe Development Bank (CEB) to approve projects for a total amount of €2.1 billion. These opinions highlighted the projects’ political and social aspects and relevant Council of Europe policies. In particular, two prison projects – a high political priority for the Council of Europe – were assessed in close co-operation with competent Council of Europe services.

Meetings of the Administrative Council, the Governing Board and the Auditing Board were prepared, managed and followed-up in an efficient manner, thanks to the good co-operation with acting CEB Chairpersons, members and the Governor’s services. The Secretariat continued to promote the work of the CEB with other Council of Europe bodies and contributed to intensifying the dialogue between the Bank and the Council of Europe.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The dialogue between the CEB and the Council of Europe, that is expected to intensify in 2012-2013, should result in further projects in the Council of Europe priority field of Human Rights (prison infrastructures), as well as other activities in favour of vulnerable groups (migrants, Roma and children).

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

Council of Europe standards, e.g. the European Convention on Human Rights, the European Prison Rules, the Action Plan for People with Disabilities or the European Social Charter, have a direct impact on the projects financed by the CEB. The Secretariat ensures that Council of Europe priorities are taken into consideration throughout the project cycle. The CEB continues its co-operation with other organisations in the framework of Memorandum of Understandings.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget (after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

1 318

 

1 318

1 287

31

97.7%

97.7%

Receipts

1 318

 

1 318

1 318

 

100.0%

100.0%

Contributions of
member States

1 285

 

1 285

1 285

 

100.0%

100.0%

Grant from the
Development Bank

33

 

33

33

 

100.0%

100.0%

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

Intercultural Dialogue – North-South Centre

“What went well” – tangible results

In the field of culture, the Intercultural cities network was extended to 21 cities from 19 countries. City policies were reviewed and local intercultural strategies were developed or updated. National Intercultural city networks in Italy, Spain and Ukraine facilitated good practice exchange and capacity building. The impact of local intercultural policies was measured through the ICC INDEX in 42 cities and the step-by-step guide to the Intercultural city has been updated. A European Academic Network on Romani Studies was created to provide evidence-based advice to policy-making in the field of Roma inclusion. This activity is carried out with the support of the European Union.

In the field of education, the Recommendation (2011)6 on Intercultural dialogue and the image of the other in history teaching was adopted by the Committee of Ministers and became a political platform for history education activities in 2011. The themes were identified and developed within the intergovernmental project “Shared Histories of a Europe without dividing lines”. The first interactive teaching pack on shared histories of Cyprus “A look at our past” was published and disseminated.

The project Intercultural education and exchanges focused on two main issues in 2011: the training of some 250 teachers in the use of the Autobiography of intercultural encounters and the development of indicators for intercultural competence. Two surveys were launched aiming at exploring educators and students understanding of the issues of religious diversity and non religious convictions in education systems in Spain, Italy, Morocco and Algeria. In co-operation with the European Wergeland Centre, the preparation of a “Road map” for assisting public authorities in implementing the measures contained in Recommendation CM/Rec (2008)12 on the Dimension of religious and non-religious convictions within intercultural education was launched.

In the field of youth, an estimated 350 youth leaders and multipliers, active in youth organisations, were involved in education and training activities for intercultural dialogue and against discrimination. The capacity of youth organisations involved in intercultural youth work was further reinforced by the training of 35 multipliers for non-formal intercultural education activities. The role of youth policy and youth work in relation to the specific situation of young refugees and asylum-seekers in transition to adulthood was highlighted, thus preparing a better visibility towards national authorities and international organisations. In two “Youth Peace Camps”, young people from conflict-struck regions established contacts and developed initiatives with their peers from “opposite” communities, thus contributing to peace-building between communities.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Policy discussions in some cities were slow to organise and in others the adoption or implementation of Intercultural strategies was delayed by changes of leadership or elections.

Particularly in the work with young asylum-seekers and refugees, co-ordination between various actors and sectors in the Council of Europe turned out to be important. Work with young people from conflict-struck regions in the context of the “Peace Camps” encountered difficulties due to the non-supportive environment in their own community; these efforts needed to be initiated over and over again.

No voluntary contributions were offered for a Council of Europe label on intercultural education, which consequently was not launched.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Work on local intercultural strategies will continue in cities members of the European network and national networks, supported by thematic seminars and study visits. An analysis of the experiences in participating cities will be used for the development of common implementation tools.

As a follow-up to the report of the Group of Eminent Persons (2011), the format of youth peace camps will be further supported and developed. Intercultural youth work and anti-discrimination activities will more strongly address situations of segregation and self-segregation, notably in the environment of the school.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

As the value added of Council of Europe, the Intercultural integration approach to migrant/minority integration promoted by “Intercultural cities” contributes to building cohesive local communities where respect of human rights is ensured and discrimination is outlawed.

The programme promoted and expanded co-operation with both international and regional organisations active in intercultural dialogue.

Co-operation with UNHCR strengthened the role and impact of the work with young refugees and asylum-seekers. Other international organisations are involved in various activities at the European Youth Centres, thus strengthening the leading role of the Organisation in the field of youth.

The co-operation with the European Wergeland Centre and with UNESCO brought a very strong added value in the field of intercultural education.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

2 870

2 671

211

2 882

2 821

61

105.6%

97.9%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Shaping Perceptions and Attitudes to Realise the Diversity Advantage (SPARDA)

31/12/2010

30/06/2012

750

74.3%

Media Against Racism in Sport (MARS)

01/01/2011

31/12/2012

1 000

80.0%

Intercultural cities 2011-2013

01/03/2011

28/02/2013

400

60.0%

European Academic Network on Romani Studies 2011-2013

01/06/2011

31/05/2013

200

59.7%

Call the Witness – Roma Pavillion 54th Venice Biennale

01/04/2011

31/12/2011

60

60.0%

European Cultural Routes 2011-2012

12/08/2011

11/02/2013

300

88.2%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Intercultural cities: governance and policies for diverse communities.

2008/DG4/
VC/1390

All member
states

840

60

92

Denmark, Norway, Portugal, United Kingdom, Others (Japan Foundation Tokyo)

Reform of history teaching in Cyprus.

2010/DG4/
VC/2348

Cyprus

230

68

25

Norway

Reform of history teaching in Ukraine.

2010/DG4/
VC/2347

Ukraine

   

Interactions and convergences within the European historical space: examples and practices.

2010/DG4/
VC/2434

All member
states

200

50

103

Norway

Intercultural education and exchanges.

2011/DG4/
VC/2583

All member
states

150

150

   

History of interactions within the Mediterranean and between the Mediterranean and Other Cultures and Regions of the World.

2010/DG4/
VC/2349

All member
states

240

80

   

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

…Intercultural Dialogue – North-South Centre

Enlarged Partial Agreement

Created in 1989

23 members

“What went well” – tangible results

The adoption of the new Statutory Resolution for the North-South Centre (NSC) by the Committee of Ministers and the endorsement of the new NSC Strategy for 2011-2013 by the Executive Committee confirmed the Centre’s importance and relevance in the framework of the new Council of Europe policy towards neighbouring regions and allowed it to streamline its activities and raise their visibility.

The co-operation with the Alliance of Civilizations further developed, in particular through the joint organisation of 2011 Lisbon Forum (held in November and dedicated to the Arab Spring with a specific focus on Morocco, Tunisia and Egypt). The Conference on “Women as actors of change in the Euro-Mediterranean region” held in October in Rome (Italy) launched the North-South Women's Empowerment Process (a series of activities to promote the role of women). The 16th Annual Award Ceremony of the North-South Prize contributed to further raise the visibility of the Council of Europe and of its North-South Centre.

The adoption of a recommendation on education for global interdependence and solidarity by the Committee of Ministers provided a strong impulse and a clear framework for enhancing promotion of global education in Europe and beyond.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Despite the adoption of the new statutory resolution and the renewed commitment of the European Union, the Centre was still confronted with important challenges. No new member joined the Centre in 2011, and there are uncertainties regarding its future, due to the difficult political and economic context in Europe.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The successful implementation of the joint programmes in 2011 contributed to the renewal of the European Union’s political and financial support. The European Union/North-South Centre Joint Management Agreement (JMA) was extended until the end of 2012. A new JMA for 2013-2015 is currently under negotiation. The NSC was included as an implementing actor in the European Union/Council of Europe Programme “Strengthening democratic reform in the southern Neighbourhood”. The Centre will be evaluated by the Directorate of Internal Oversight in the second half of 2012.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The NSC has more than 20 years of recognised expertise in the fields of education, youth co-operation and intercultural dialogue. It established strong networks in the Southern Mediterranean and Africa and serves as a platform for regional co-operation at different levels (government, parliamentary, local and regional authorities, and civil society). The Centre developed strong ties with the European Union and the UN. It has the capacity to play a key role, especially in light of Council of Europe’s development of a new neighbourhood policy.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

1 468

-6

1 462

1 450

12

98.8%

99.2%

Operational expenditure

861

-21

840

828

12

96.2%

98.6%

Programme expenditure

607

15

622

622

 

102.5%

100.0%

Receipts

1 468

-6

1 462

1 462

 

99.6%

100.0%

Contributions of
member States

879

 

879

879

 

100.0%

100.0%

Additional voluntary
contributions from
member States

 

43

43

43

   

100.0%

Contribution from the
European Commission

400

-100

300

300

 

75.0%

100.0%

Voluntary contributions –
Portugal

169

-3

166

166

 

98.2%

100.0%

Grants from other
budgets

 

64

64

64

   

100.0%

Other receipts

20

-10

10

10

 

50.0%

100.0%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Joint management Agreement for global/development education and raising public awareness in Europe and beyond

01/01/2009

31/12/2012

1 080

66.5%

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

Protection of Natural Diversity – Major Natural and Technological Disasters (EUR-OPA)

“What went well” – tangible results

The monitoring of the Bern Convention continued in 2011. Its implementation by states was assessed in a number of topics (threatened species, island ecosystems, changes of biodiversity with climate change, biosafety) and the examination of presumed breaches (“file-case system”) was pursued in 13 cases. The 70 European diploma sites were monitored. Also six new standard setting instruments and charters were adopted. Areas of special interest for nature conservation were identified in four states (100% coverage) and in further three states (80% coverage). Support was received from parties through voluntary contributions and a Joint Programme with the European Union was successfully finalised.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The success in the implementation of article 4 (habitat protection) makes it likely that a Joint Programme with the European Union will be continued in 2013. Innovative work in both climate change and biodiversity, biosafety and monitoring of obligations concerning illegal bird hunting will make the Council of Europe role in biodiversity more relevant at the European scale.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Bern Convention is the only general biodiversity treaty at pan-European level and Northern Africa and its relevance for the conservation and sustainable use of nature is well recognised. Co-operation and useful synergies with the European Union, the European Environment Agency, the United Nations Environment Programme, the International Union for Nature Conservation and other biodiversity-related conventions and bodies continue, avoiding overlaps and implementing in harmony international commitments of parties.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

586

541

(1)

540

523

17

96.7%

96.9%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Support for the implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity Programme of Work on Protected Areas in the EU Neighbourhood Policy East Area and Russia

06/12/2008

15/04/2012

1 484

100.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Promoting and monitoring biological diversity policies through the Bern Convention.

2009/DG4/
VC/1992

All member States,
Belarus,
Burkina Faso,
Morocco,
Senegal,
Tunisia

800

60

803

Andorra, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Luxembourg, Republic of Moldova, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Serbia, Slovak Republic, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, European Union

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

… Protection of Natural Diversity – Major Natural and Technological Disasters (EUR-OPA)

Partial Agreement

Created in 1987

26 members

“What went well” – tangible results

Following the 2010 successful Ministerial Session, a restructuration of the budget and associated activities was implemented by the Committee of Permanent Correspondents in order to streamline them to a few clear priorities. Thus, regular subventions will be cut down and criteria for funding activities were set, improving the efficiency of the network of associated technical centres. One resolution and two recommendations were adopted, focusing primarily on Council of Europe general priorities (i.e. ethical issues in disaster risk reduction).

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The reorganisation of the network of specialised centres will allow a more effective and streamlined implementation of the priorities set in the medium Term Plan for 2011-2015. New activities were launched following the Fukushima disaster and the Chernobyl’s 25th anniversary, aiming at better preparing population to radiation risk. Forest fires will also receive particular attention after a World Conference on Forest Fires and the approved recommendation.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

Activities with the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction were consolidated, in particular through the European Forum on Disaster Reduction, and co-operation with UNEP, UNDP, Unesco, IUCN and other organisations were strengthened.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage (Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

1 332

 

1 332

1 249

 83

100.0%

100.0%

Receipts

1 332

 

1 332

1 332

 

100.0%

100.0%

Contributions of
member States

1 332

 

1 332

1 332

 

100.0%

100.0%

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

Protection of Cultural Diversity, Heritage and Landscape and Eurimages

“What went well” – tangible results

Cultural Policy work offered practical support to member States, giving visibility to the Council of Europe in this important field. The CultureWatchEurope (CWE) initiative was confirmed as an innovative Council of Europe product. A high level think tank produced policy principles that offer orientation for future work in member state’s cultural sectors as well as the Council of Europe. Four hot topic papers provided insight on current policy challenges and developments. The CWE platform was reconceived in synergy with the Compendium information system, providing a space for governmental and civil society exchange on data, trends and policy concerns. The thematic Compendium space on Ethics and Human Rights in cultural policy was enlarged, the Compendium’s new multilingual features enhance the access to Compendium information and a new profile for Bosnia and Herzegovina was produced. The launch of a world-wide cultural policy information system based on the Compendium generated strong visibility for the activities.

The success and awareness of the cultural heritage conventions were increased with the ratifications of the Valletta Convention (archaeological heritage) by the Russian Federation and Spain, the Granada Convention (architectural heritage) by Poland, and the Faro Convention (Value of cultural heritage for society) by Georgia, Luxembourg and “The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”. The Faro Convention entered into force in June. The 3rd version of the heritage information system (HEREIN), which now offers new follow-up renewed instruments for the follow-up of the conventions, was tested in the states and presented to 40 national coordinators. As one of the biggest programmes of European cultural co-operation, the European Heritage Days (EHDs) boasted the engagement of 50 states and public participation with 20 million visitors to hosted events.

In 2011, four states (Azerbaijan, Georgia, Serbia, and Sweden) have ratified the European Landscape Convention and one state (Andorra) has signed it (to date, 35 contracting parties and four signatory states).

In the field of cultural heritage and technical assistance, the close partnership with the European Union was strengthened and diversified, in particularly through the Joint Programme Ljubljana Process II – Rehabilitating our common heritage (new methodology responding to the objectives for European integration of SEE countries). Technical management responsibilities are being transferred to the region (permanent endorsement of the process by the countries envisaged by 2014). The results of the Local Development Pilot Projects prompted Cyprus to initiate a pilot project with the aim of developing a case study to develop principles related to one of the priorities of the European Union Cyprus Presidency (territorial cohesion based on democratic participation). The successful completion of the Kyiv Initiative Joint Programme Rehabilitation of Cultural Heritage in Historic Towns as opened up new possibilities. A large network of historic towns (39) mobilised interministerial partners to consider different development models based on democratic participation and better governance. The European Union/Council of Europe Support to the Promotion of Cultural Diversity in Kosovo24 project (PCDK) intensified efforts to strengthen the human infrastructure. Education and public awareness of cultural heritage and diversity were encouraged through new school and university courses.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The implementation of the Cultural Policy Review of Turkey was delayed for political reasons. A meeting held with authorities in December 2011 succeeded in reinvigorating the exercise that will be followed-up in 2012 with expert visits and the production of the national and final expert reports.

European Union funding for the Operational Phase of the Joint Programme Rehabilitation of Cultural Heritage in Historic Towns was not confirmed at the end of 2011. As the countries themselves are however insisting on pursuing the activity, which is still on the Eastern Partnership Programme’s list of activities, a transitional plan was set up in order to continue and develop the huge potential of the project.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Policy principles and insights produced by CWE for governmental and other policy actors will be followed up via the CDCPP. The 2012-2013 events will apply the principles to concrete policy concerns dealing with participation in and access to culture. The principles will also inspire the work of the forthcoming Ministerial Conference on Culture (Moscow, November 2012). The interaction between policy analysis, assistance to policy revision and capacity building is important to enhance the overall impact of policy reviews. Political momentum was created for a thematically focused cultural policy review in ENPI countries on the theme of public-private partnerships in culture. Additional funds in 2012 would allow such a pertinent exercise to start smoothly, in early 2012.

In the framework of the European Heritage Days, a guide for implementing European events will allow to promote cross-frontier co-operation (exchange programme on youth work in heritage notably). An electronic platform will become functional in 2012.

In the field of cultural heritage and technical assistance, the Programme of activities 2012-2013 was secured thanks to the results of 2011: the new Ljubljana Process II Joint Programme with the European Union will ensure the decentralisation of the process to the Regional Cooperation Council with new responsibilities taken directly by beneficiary countries. Pending further funding from the European Union, alternative partnerships will be explored in order to attract other international financial institutions to the Rehabilitation of cultural heritage in historic town’s project.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Council of Europe is recognised as a major “capacity builder” on democratic governance for culture, heritage and landscape and constitutes an outstanding platform for communication between public authorities, professionals and civil society of the 50 European Cultural Convention countries. Its added value mainly consists in the working methods it has initiated and its ability for networking. The contribution of the programme for culture and heritage to conflict prevention, resolution and post-conflict actions through its pilot projects has been recently emphasized. Furthermore, the Council of Europe developed an updated concept of European heritage that is linked to human rights, the social fabric and social cohesion. Excellent co-operation with the European Union, IOM, the alliance of Civilisations, UNESCO Habitat has ensured excellent visibility and recognition of achievements.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

3 263

3 042

(72)

2 970

2 935

35

96.5%

98.8%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Support to the promotion of Cultural Diversity in Kosovo25

15/10/2009

14/04/2012

2 500

90.1%

European Heritage Days 2010

01/03/2010

28/02/2011

100

50.0%

Study on European Cultural Routes impact on small and medium size enterprises (SME's) innovation and competitiveness

14/09/2010

13/06/2011

200

83.1%

2nd Covenant for the Kyiv Initiative's Pilot Project on the rehabilitation of Cultural Heritage in Historic Towns

01/12/2010

30/11/2011

100

50.0%

European Heritage Days 2011

01/01/2011

31/12/2011

100

50.0%

Support to Ljubljana Process II : Rehabilitating our Common Heritage

19/05/2011

18/05/2014

400

80.0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Developing the Council of Europe's cultural governance observatory function and the Compendium and HEREIN systems (phase 4).

2009/DG4/
VC/2075

Parties to the European Cultural Convention

700

150

499

Austria, Azerbaijan, Croatia, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Hungary, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, Others

Territorial Dimension of Human Rights and Democracy.

150

2010/DG4/
VC/2561

All member
states

840

34

Andorra,
Finland,
San Marino,
Switzerland

Integrated rehabilitation projects in South East Europe.

2010/DG4/
VC/2545

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, ''the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia'', Kosovo

200

     

Pilot Projects for local development and institutional capacity building.

2010/DG4/
VC/2283

Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, ''the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia'', South-East Europe, Kosovo26

400

 

29

Belgium,
Slovenia

Kyiv Initiative: a new phase in democracy through culture.

2010/DG4/
VC/2285

Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Republic of Moldova, Ukraine

800

 

70

France,
Others (Central European Initiative)

Reinforced Assistance Projects to develop an integrated approach to managing cultural and natural resources

2010/DG4/
VC/2547

All member
states

300

     

Cultural and natural heritage and intercommunity relations in Kosovo.

2010/DG4/
VC/2546

Cyprus,
Georgia,
Republic of Moldova,
Kosovo

300

100

   

Intercultural dialogue through the arts and heritage.

2010/DG4/
VC/2020

All member
states

280

50

29

Azerbaijan, Hungary, Spain, Holy See, Others (European Association of Vie Francigene)

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

…Protection of Cultural Diversity, Heritage and Landscape and Eurimages

Partial Agreement

Created in 1998

34 members

“What went well” – tangible results

2011 saw a noticeable increase in the number of cinematographic co-productions supported: (taking into account one withdrawal) 71 European co-productions received support (56 were supported in 2010; an increase of 26.8%).

The number of theatres in the Eurimages network has slightly increased: 38 cinemas (36 in 2010).

The number of member States in Eurimages has increased; two more countries with a rich film culture have joined: Russia and Georgia.

The continued recognition by large international film festivals of co-productions supported by Eurimages has served to consolidate the Fund’s place within the European film sector. In 2011, Eurimages once again shone, with many supported films winning awards – some of which being prizes of great renown: The Silver Bear for A torinói ló (The Horse of Turin) by Béla Tarr and The Grand Jury Prize at Cannes for The Kid with a Bike by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne and Bir Zamanlar Anadolu'da – Once upon a time in Anatolia by Nuri Bilge Ceylan.

By making the rules for co-production support more strict – 50% of the financing must be confirmed by the submission date of the request for support –the secretariat has been able to work in a more efficient manner on projects which are at a later stage in their development and have thus drastically reduced the number of projects withdrawn during the processing of their support request (79 requests were withdrawn in 2010 as opposed to 28 withdrawals in 2011).

The secretariat is developing a paperless platform for the submission of co-production projects via the Internet. The implementation of this platform should considerably simplify administrative formalities, both for producers and for the Secretariat.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The distribution support programme recorded a fall in the support granted in 2011: 94 (taking into account 22 withdrawals) compared to 153 in 2010 (taking into account four withdrawals). Irregularities regarding the support granted to distributors in “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” lead the Fund to carry out a series of audits in this country and to freeze the distribution support programme pending further audits in the other countries benefitting from the programme (Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia and Turkey). At the end of the analysis of the results, a reform of the programme could be envisaged.

The new digital equipment support programme for cinema theatres, which was launched at the beginning of 2011, has been slow to take off, notably due to the lack of co-financing from the film market affected by the financial crises. Taking into account the increased number of countries able to take advantage of the programme however (notably Russia and Georgia), this could possibly change in 2012. More targeted publicity is also foreseen amongst cinema owners who could take advantage of this support.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Each year, the members of the Eurimages Board of Management take stock of the impact of their decisions on the film industry and make changes to the rules governing the support programmes. As a result of this process, starting in January 2012, the Eurimages Fund will open up the co-production support programme to non-European producers. 2012 will also be a year to reflect upon ad hoc co-operation with other non-member countries. An external evaluation of the results and the functioning of the Fund should be carried out in 2013.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

Eurimages is now a well-established player on the international festival scene (Berlin and Cannes amongst others), thanks to its assiduous collaboration with the Media Programme, which offers a space to Eurimages on its stand every year. The added value of Eurimages lies in the fact that it is the only European Fund for co-production support and the importance of its activities is recognised by all film industry professionals: at Berlin, Eurimages has become an essential part of the Co-production Market, whilst at Cannes the well-established co-operation between the Producers’ Network and the brand new association of “European Film Promotion” (EFP), means Eurimages holds great sway over the European film scene. Furthermore, Eurimages strives to develop its policy of support and promotion of European cinema with the continuation of the Eurimages Co-production Development Award presented within the framework of the main European film markets, the Eurimages prize-awards and the European Co-production Award, for producers whose contribution to promoting European cinematographic works has been judged as outstanding, within the prestigious framework of the “European Film Awards”.

Eurimages is working in close association with those involved in the current reworking of the European Convention on Cinematographic Co-Production, which is being undertaken by the Directorate of Culture and Heritage of the Council of Europe. Notably, this involves adapting the text in line with the evolution of the film industry.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget (after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

23 373

24 884

48 257

25 128

23 129

107.5%

52.1%

Operational expenditure

2 369

233

2 602

2 268

334

95.7%

87.2%

Programme expenditure

21 004

24 651

45 655

22 860

22 795

108.8%

50.1%

Receipts

23 373

24 884

48 257

48 257

 

206.5%

100.0%

Contributions of
member States

21 381

 

21 381

21 381

 

100.0%

100.0%

Bank interest

750

-4

746

746

 

99.5%

100.0%

Income arising from
programme activities

1 242

1 141

2 383

2 383

 

191.9%

100.0%

Credit balance of
previous year's budget

 

22 091

22 091

22 091

   

100.0%

Other receipts

 

1 656

1 656

1 656

   

100.0%

Explanation of variances: Pursuant to a Committee of Ministers' decision, the result for 2010 has been carried forward to 2011 and the original budget has been adjusted accordingly. The surplus at the year-end mainly corresponds to projects approved by the Board at the end of the financial year but awaiting signature.

PROMOTING DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE AND STABILITY

Enlarged Partial Agreement on Cultural Routes (EPA)

Enlarged Partial Agreement

Created in 2010

14 members

“What went well” – tangible results

The Enlarged Partial Agreement was established in December 2010 and activities in this framework were launched during 2011. Fourteen independent evaluations of existing routes and new proposals were carried out in preparation of recommendations to the Governing Board in 2012, and a database of experts was created. A successful Advisory Forum in November brought together around 100 managers of cultural routes, academics and specialists in cultural tourism.

At the end of the year, the appointment of an executive secretary working in Luxembourg directly with the team of the European Institute of Cultural Routes reinforced relations between the Institute and the Council of Europe bringing new impetus to the programme.

A joint programme with the European Union was concluded by the presentation of an extensive study of the impact of the cultural routes on small and medium-sized industries, and a new programme was launched in August targeting capacity-building, network governance, visibility and marketing of the routes.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The number of member States of the partial agreement did not increase – there does not appear to be sufficient linkage between the multitude of actors and activities on the ground, which cover over fifty countries, and the levels of central government policy-makers.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The decision to appoint an executive secretary working in Luxembourg directly with the team of the European Institute of Cultural Routes, which itself works directly with routes networks, will certainly reinforce relations between the Institute and the Council of Europe and bring further effectiveness to the programme.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Council of Europe’s long-standing work in cultural heritage and on the value of cultural heritage for society is put into extremely concrete practice by the cultural routes programme. The Council of Europe certification is seen as a prestigious and sought-after label. Efforts will continue to articulate the routes programme with the UNESCO protected sites and new European Union Heritage Label. One particular new proposal reveals that certain groups of protected sites already consider cultural route certification as a second phase after inscription on the UNESCO list, by the establishment of a network of similar protected sites.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

200

 

200

152

48

76.0%

76.0%

Receipts

200

 

200

200

 

100.0%

100.0%

Contributions of
member States

200

 

200

200

 

100.0%

100.0%

Explanation of variances: The enlarged agreement was established in December 2010 and the first budget was approved in March 2011. The variance in the 2011 spending compared to the final budget is explained due to the fact that this budget included appropriations for the salary of the Executive Secretary of the Enlarged Partial Agreement for six months, whereas he was only appointed only in November 2011.

BUILDING A DEMOCRATIC CULTURE
Education for Sustainable Democratic Societies – European Centre for Modern Languages

“What went well” – tangible results

The Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education was broadly disseminated and its implementation was supported through the definition of key elements for a follow-up strategy. A project on “Learning the key principles and the functioning of the human rights protection system” was launched with the European Court of Human Rights, with whom co-operation is now well established. The Pestalozzi Programme trained some 900 educational professionals to implement and disseminate Council of Europe standards and values. Draft recommendations on the right to quality education and on the public responsibility for academic freedom and institutional autonomy were developed and will be submitted to the first session of the CDPPE in March 2012. The Council of Europe is a leader in the development of qualifications frameworks in the European Higher Education Area and in policy development for language education. Several Joint Programmes (JPs) worth around €12 M were implemented in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkey and Kosovo27.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Negotiations on new Joint Programmes have proven to be more complex and time consuming than foreseen and have not yet been concluded. For the same reason, the number of bilateral and regional activities was somewhat lower than planned.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The 2012-2013 programme has been built on the outcomes of the 2011 programme. In particular, on the position of the Council of Europe as a leading organisation in the areas of education for democratic citizenship and human rights education, history teaching, qualifications, language policy in education and intercultural dialogue, and the Council of Europe’s position as a key contributor to the development of the European Higher Education Area.

The 2012-2013 programme brings together policy development and education practice as illustrated by the Pestalozzi Programme and the implementation of the Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Council of Europe is the leading organisation underlining the importance of education not only to the economy but also to democratic citizenship, personal development and a broad knowledge base. The focus on public responsibility is specific to the Council and brings together considerations of values and structural reform. Co-operation with European Wergeland Centre, as an important instrument for disseminating good practice, in particular as concerns citizenship and human rights education and intercultural dialogue. Co-operation with the European Commission is strong and increasing further, in particular through Joint Programmes. The Council of Europe enjoys very strong co-operation with civil society in the education sector as well as good co-operation with UNESCO and ODIHR. In language policy, good co-operation was developed with the OECD and, in higher education, with NGO partners in the United States. Following the Council of Europe initiative an international contact group on citizenship and human rights education was set up in 2011 (including the OHCHR, UNESCO, OSCE/ODIHR, EC, European Union FRA, ALECSO and the Council of Europe), with a view to promote synergies and further co-operation.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

3 591

3 343

99

3 442

3 425

17

102.5%

99.5%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Education in UNMIK/Kosovo28
Inter-culturalism and the Bologna Process

12/06/2008

11/12/2011

1 400

90,3%

Strengthening Higher Education in Bosnia and Herzegovina (SHEIII)

15/02/2009

31/03/2011

400

80,0%

Promoting cultural diversity and social cohesion in a multi-ethnic society through intercultural dialogue

01/09/2011

31/08/2014

4 500

92,8%

Democratic Citizenship and HR Education in Turkey

01/06/2011

31/05/2014

5 800

95,1%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Learning democracy and human rights.

2011/DG4/
VC/2581

Multilateral

774

500

10

Finland

The Pestalozzi Programme – training of education professionals.

2011/DG4/
VC/2582
(Pestalozzi)

Parties to the European Cultural Convention

280

95

Andorra, Croatia, Cyprus, Finland, France, Germany, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom

Language education policies and right to education.

2010/DG4/
VC/2435

All member States and other parties to the European Cultural Convention

100

100

104

Norway

Learning democracy and human rights.

2011/DG4/
VC/2581

CIS and South-East Europe member States

300

80

   

Training and capacity-building for human rights education with children and young people through non-formal learning and support to youth policies.

2011//DG4/
VC/2612

Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Serbia, ''the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia'', Turkey, Ukraine, Baltic states, Caucasian countries, South-East Europe, Belarus, Kosovo29

100

100

   

BUILDING A DEMOCRATIC CULTURE

….Education for Sustainable Democratic Societies – European Centre for Modern Languages

Enlarged Partial Agreement

Created in 1994

34 members

“What went well” – tangible results

In 2011, the European Centre for Modern Languages (ECML) focused on the development of new instruments and materials for language education professionals in member States. 21 publications addressing key issues in language education were released. The series of practical training kits, guides, research findings, reference materials and frameworks dealt with current challenges in language education, such as standard-setting and assessment, promoting quality and excellence, innovation through content-based language education and application of ICT, and developing language skills for a competitive job market.

A large-scale conference in September, involving over 200 language education specialists from all over Europe and from Canada, marked the culmination of the Empowering language professionals programme of activities (2008-2011). The event served primarily to present the results of ECML projects to key stakeholders and representatives of dissemination networks. 93% of respondents at the conference stated that the event had fully met or exceeded their expectations.

In response to the Call for submissions for the Centre’s Learning through languages programme (2012-2015), over 400 language education professionals applied to take an active role within the programme by the closing deadline on 1 May. The expert advisory group, reviewing the project proposals, awarded 29 of the 53 proposals received with the highest rating and commented on the exceptionally high quality of the submissions. The ECML’s Governing Board subsequently adopted the 2012-2015 programme comprising 15 projects together with a new area focusing on targeted support for member States.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The prevailing economic climate made it an exceptionally challenging year for the Centre, with three states withdrawing from the partial agreement (PA), as a result of budgetary difficulties. Due to the short notice afforded, restructuring and reorientation had to be carried out rapidly by the Secretariat.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Due to the economic downturn and consequent withdrawals from the partial agreement, new forms of co-operation and the agreements involving additional third-party financing are in the process of examination. This experience also highlighted the need to contextualise the ECML’s work largely in relation to other relevant developments in education such as the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), the European qualifications frameworks, as well as with regard to national reform initiatives.

The language learning instruments provide a basis for widening the Centre’s current client base and attracting new groups into the ECML’s work. Several of the projects within the 2012-2015 programme target groups with a stake in the provision of high-quality language education, such as parents and the corporate world.

Promotion and take-up of the new instruments was greatly enhanced through the development of an extensive dissemination network (National Contact Points, INGO Professional Network Forum and cultural institutes) now potentially reaching a vast audience.

The demand for consultancy and training on areas of expertise of the ECML led to the establishment of a new ‘targeted support’ offer within the Centre’s programme, proposing direct support in language education to member States.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Centre further intensified its co-operation with civil society through the INGO-Professional Network Forum on language education, comprising 12 international associations and institutions. The Forum’s membership offers a potential channel of dissemination to hundreds of thousands of language education practitioners.

Important progress was made in the further development of co-operation with the European Union. To mark the 10th anniversary of the European Day of Languages, a Joint Declaration was issued by the Secretary General and the European Commissioner for Education, Culture, Multilingualism and Youth. The Centre is currently engaged as a full partner or associate partner in five Commission funded projects.

The Centre’s Learning through languages programme will be based upon an inclusive approach to plurilingual and intercultural education and focus on the right of the learner to good quality language education.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

1 706

 

1 706

1 661

45

97.4%

97.4%

Operational expenditure

1 025

 

1 025

980

45

95.6%

95.6%

Programme expenditure

681

 

681

681

 

100.0%

100.0%

Receipts

1 706

 

1 706

1 706

 

100.0%

100.0%

Contributions of
member States

1 706

 

1 706

1 706

 

100.0%

100.0%

BUILDING A DEMOCRATIC CULTURE

Youth Participation and Citizenship – EYF – Youth Mobility Through the Youth Card

“What went well” – tangible results

The programme contributed to the development of youth policies in member States, mainly through the international review of the youth policy of the three Belgian communities, the support to youth information in Europe, the promotion of Council of Europe youth policy standards among youth centres within the member States, and the development of policy guidelines on child and youth participation.

The programme successfully trained over 800 youth leaders and administrators from all member States in the two European Youth Centres or in field activities. Thematic priorities were human rights education, democratic youth participation and social inclusion of young people. Strategic developments in human rights education with children and young people was supported in member States through capacity-building activities and the publication of the Council of Europe manual on human rights education with children (“Compasito”) in Greek, Armenian and Dutch.

The “Enter!” project promoting the access of young people from disadvantage urban neighbourhoods to social rights was particularly successful in terms of outreach and visibility: some 15 000 young people were reached through youth work projects; a policy recommendation was prepared; and an educational game was developed for the 50th anniversary of the European Social Charter. Governmental and non-governmental partners of the youth sector were motivated to address challenges in access to social rights for Roma young people in youth policy. A “Roma Youth Action Plan” was prepared in close co-operation with Roma youth organisations. Youth policy and youth work developments were supported in Albania, the Russian Federation, Serbia and Turkey. Conditions for Euro-Arab and Euro-Mediterranean co-operation were improved through youth projects developed with youth leaders and youth workers. A group of 70 future youth peace ambassadors initiated a learning process that will lead to the constitution of a network and the setting up of various initiatives for peace-building based on human rights and conflict transformation.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Difficulties persisted with regard to appropriate follow up and (soft) monitoring of the international reviews of national youth policies, due to lack of resources and (in some cases) political and administrative obstacles at the level of member States.

Some activities in training and advocacy in human rights education could not be held due to the lack of matching funds or the difficult political situation (Belarus). Co-operation with the Arab World and the Southern Mediterranean region requires time and development of credible and solid partnerships. Co-operation with Roma youth organisations needs to be sustained and opened to other international players; particularly with a view to real Roma youth participation, the programming of activities needs to be sufficiently flexible. The network of youth peace ambassadors was difficult to set up, because participants had to reconcile international training obligations and an ongoing engagement within the local or national organisation.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Programme results had a clear impact on the preparation of the international review of the youth policy of Ukraine, and two policy reviews on child and youth participation (together with DG I). 2012 is the first year of implementation of the Council of Europe “Quality Label for Youth Centres”.

The results of 2011 are relevant for the expected results for 2012-2013, particularly with regard to the emerging “Roma Youth Action Plan” and the preparation of the Committee of Ministers recommendation to member States on access to social rights for young people from disadvantaged neighbourhoods. The publication of a revised version of the Council of Europe manual on human rights education with young people (“Compass”) and of a youth-friendly version of the Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education will give a new impetus to partners promoting human rights education at national level. Co-operation with the Arab and Mediterranean region needs to build on the results of the 2011 programme. The Youth Peace Ambassadors programme, initiated in 2011, will produce tangible results in 2012-2013.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Council of Europe is the leading organisation in terms of innovation in youth policy and youth work, particularly in the areas of human rights education and education for democratic citizenship, intercultural dialogue and the access of young people to social rights. Capacity-building for human rights education and democracy activities are implemented in close co-operation with national governmental and non-governmental partners. OSCE/ODIHR and the “Open Society Foundations” co-operated in activities with young Roma. Field offices are involved in activities of future Youth Peace Ambassadors. The League of Arab States and the United Nations Population Fund are key partners in selected activities.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

5 084

4 733

(34)

4 699

4 615

84

97.5%

98.2%

Extra-budgetary resources

Joint Programmes

Joint Programme

Begin Date

End Date

EU contribution
in thousand €

EU contribution
in %

Framework Partnership Agreement in the field of Youth

01/07/2010

31/12/2013

2 100

50,0%

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Training and capacity-building for human rights education with children and young people through non-formal learning and support to youth policies.

2011/DG4/
VC/2612

Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Serbia, ''the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia'', Turkey, Ukraine, Baltic states, Caucasian countries, South-East Europe, Belarus, Kosovo30

100

40

   

ENTER! – Promoting the access of young people from disadvantaged neighbourhoods to social rights.

2009/DG4/
VC/2256

All member
states

300

220

112

Belgium

Youth Peace Ambassadors.

2011/DG4/
VC/2614

Baltic states, Caucasian countries, South-East Europe, Multilateral, States Parties to the European Cultural Convention

120

120

   

European Youth Centre Strasbourg – Renovation works.

2009/DG4/
VC/2137

All member
states

1 200

170

275

Austria, Belgium (Flemish Community), France, Germany, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia

BUILDING A DEMOCRATIC CULTURE

…Youth participation and citizenship – EYF Youth Mobility Through the Youth Card

“What went well” – tangible results

The 2011 figures, even decreasing, confirm the essential role of the European Youth Foundation (EYF) in strengthening the development process of the European youth NGOs and civil society:

· 705 applications received (751 in 2010);

· 281 grants awarded (339 in 2010);

· sustainability of 50 international NGOs supported through administrative grants (57 in 2010);

· 74 pilot projects developed at local or regional level with a European dimension (98 in 2010).

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Based on the EYF secretariat’s proposals and in the framework of the reform process of the Council of Europe, the Joint Council on Youth agreed on modifications to the operational regulations of the EYF, aimed at simplifying its working methods and increasing its impact in member States.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The EYF is recognised as a very flexible tool which gives priority to non formal education, supports the development of civil society and fights discrimination, notably by supporting projects focussing on intercultural dialogue, mutual respect and understanding.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

3 289

128

3 417

3 094

323

94.1%

90.6%

Receipts

3 289

128

3 417

3 469

52

105.5%

101.5%

Contributions of
member States

3 096

 

3 096

3 096

 

100.0%

100.0%

Other receipts

193

128

321

373

52

193.3%

116.2%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

European Youth Foundation.

2011/DG4/
VC/2520

States parties to the European Cultural Convention

70

70

70

Finland, Germany

BUILDING A DEMOCRATIC CULTURE

…Youth Participation and Citizenship – EYF – Youth Mobility Through the Youth Card

Partial Agreement

Created in 1991

19 members

“What went well” – tangible results

The European Youth Card Association (EYCA), partner of the Council of Europe for the implementation of the Partial Agreement, welcomed new youth card associations in the following countries: Georgia (Academy for Peace and Development), Ireland (European Youth Card Ireland), Bosnia-Herzegovina (Association of Citizens Auctus) and Sweden (Mecenat.se).

Work during 2011 to introduce the European Youth Card in England in partnership with the National Youth Agency culminated in defining a clear rationale and business model.

EYCA’s ability to provide online discounts and opportunities took significant leaps forward during 2011 through the development of a Common Cardholders’ Database (CCDB). Validity of all European Youth Cards will be verified through CCDB and a database of card data for four million young people will enable EYCA to develop partnerships with large online services to offer strong added value and verifiable opportunities for all young people.

During the “European Year of Volunteering” of the European Union in 2011, EYCA continued to issue cards and to provide information to every volunteer in the European Voluntary Service programme (EVS). In addition, in co-operation with the Alliance of European Voluntary Service Organisations, 5000 European Youth Cards were distributed to volunteers outside the EVS in 15 countries. EYCA promoted volunteering as part of the “Volunteer! Make a difference” campaign on both national and European level through the EYCAtcher newsletter, the eyca.org and eyca.org/trafo website, as well as in its annual report. EYCA members were encouraged to join the national stops of the European Year of Volunteering Tour and to promote it among their cardholders.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Despite the ongoing efforts to increase the number of members of the Partial Agreement, no new country joined in 2011 (in contrast to the increasing membership of EYCA). Morocco confirmed its decision to join, but no official letter was received in 2011.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Through its co-operation and support to its main partner the European Youth Card Association, the Partial Agreement contributed to extend the number of youth card systems in Europe thus enabling a greater number of young people to take part in mobility projects.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Council of Europe co-operates first and foremost with the European Youth Card Association (EYCA) through this Partial Agreement. It is through the partial agreement that a unique way is found to address governments and involve them into mobility programmes. On the one hand it helps EYCA intensify governmental support for the development of the card and mobility programmes and on the other hand it helps the government fulfil their youth policy responsibility specifically with regard to the Council of Europe values and concerns on mobility.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

86

 

86

85

1

98.8%

98.8%

Receipts

86

 

86

86

 

100.0%

100.0%

Contributions of
member States

86

 

86

86

 

100.0%

100.0%

BUILDING A DEMOCRATIC CULTURE

Promoting a fair sport without doping and violence – Enlarged Partial Agreement on Sport (EPAS)

“What went well” – tangible results

Malta ratified the Anti-doping Convention and Brazil joined the European Convention on Spectator Violence as an observer.

In respect of monitoring the readiness of States Parties to evaluate their anti-doping policies, an anti-doping online questionnaire was revived and the first analytical summary on the state of the fight against doping in Europe was adopted.

UEFA contributed €80 K for a joint programme of co-operation with Poland and Ukraine aimed at "Fostering Safety and Security at UEFA EURO 2012".

A common will of streamlining the monitoring mechanisms (on-line questionnaires) of the Council of Europe, UNESCO and WADA was expressed and preliminary steps were taken in this direction.

The Ad hoc European Committee for the World Anti-Doping Agency (CAHAMA) has provided WADA with about 50 recommendations on various aspects of the fight against doping for the revision of the World Anti-doping Code.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

After a promising start in 2010, the discussions on the possible accession of European Union to the Anti-doping Convention slowed down.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The revival of the anti-doping questionnaire and its possible merger with UNESCO's and WADA's questionnaires will reinforce the monitoring capacity worldwide, but will lead to significant investments to be dealt through voluntary contributions.

The feasibility of European Union accession to the Council of Europe’s anti-doping Convention needs to be evaluated. The integration between the European Union Experts Groups on anti-doping and the CAHAMA needs to be improved.

An increased interest for further developing the European Convention on Spectator Violence was expressed and might lead to a reinforcement of its monitoring capacities. For both Council of Europe sport Conventions resource mobilisation strategies need to be developed for funding technical assistance projects and obtaining new ratifications by the last few member States of the Council of Europe that did not yet do so.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Council of Europe remains a reference in the field of sport trough two Conventions and their monitoring tools.

In the field of anti-doping, the Council of Europe provides a policy platform. The CAHAMA is unequalled as the only bridge for European public authorities to global anti-doping work, as acknowledged by WADA.

The Council of Europe is the only international organisation to work in the field of spectator violence; it sets standards and closely co-operates with the sport movement, UEFA, FIFA.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

467

435

35

470

465

5

106.9%

98.9%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Reinforcement of the monitoring of antidoping policies and practices in co-operation with WADA and UNESCO.

2010/DG4/
VC/2419

All member
states

80

25

   

Enhancing intergovernmental co-operation on safety and security at sport events.

2011/DG4/
VC/2649

All member
states

20

10

   

BUILDING A DEMOCRATIC CULTURE

…Promoting a fair sport without doping and violence – Enlarged partial agreement on Sport (EPAS)

Enlarged Partial Agreement

Created in 2007

33 members

“What went well” – tangible results

Two Recommendations to member States, initially prepared by EPAS, were adopted by the Deputies: the first ever intergovernmental standard on Autonomy of the sports movement (CM/Rec(2011)3, adopted on 28 September 2011), and a recommendation on match-fixing (CM/Rec(2011)10, adopted on 2 February 2011), where the Council of Europe took a leading position.

In the field of fighting discrimination in and through sport, the initiatives of EPAS on “Gender mainstreaming in sport” received large political attention, allowing new partnerships to be established and opening the perspective of a future standard.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

There was a break in the flow of new accessions, and one dropout. Follow-up will be given to the interested countries, which have declared being in the process of joining EPAS.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

As per the request of the Governing Board and following co-ordination meetings organised by the European Union Presidencies, better relationship with the European Union institutions towards more co-operation will allow a better co-ordination and the development of joint projects.

Following the Conference on “Women in Sport” (London, October 2011), a new recommendation on Gender-mainstreaming in Sport will be prepared.

As a follow-up to the Recommendation CM/Rec(2011)10, fighting manipulation of sport results will remain high on the political agenda and in the priorities of EPAS. Some functions to enhance the fight against match-fixing may be established in the framework of possible new instrument(s).

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The Council of Europe, through EPAS, has expertise, political support and reactivity to address new challenges. Continuous consultations with 23 organisations representing the Sports Movement within the Consultative Committee, allow ensuring close co-operation on issues of common interest (match-fixing). Co-operation with the European Union is strong and is considered through the prism of avoiding any duplication in work between these two organisations.

Budgetary resources

 

Approved
budget

Adjust-
ments

Final Budget
(after adjust-ments)

Expenditure/
Receipts

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final Budget)

Expenditure

853

 

853

837

16

98.1%

98.1%

Receipts

853

 

853

861

8

100.9%

100.9%

Contributions of
member States

853

 

853

853

 

100.0%

100.0%

Sundry receipts

     

8

8

 

800.0%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

EPAS projects in partnership between public authorities and the sports movement.

2010/EPAS/
VC/2394

Enlarged Partial Agreement on Sport (EPAS)

300

15

15

Monaco


GOVERNING BODIES,
GENERAL SERVICES AND OTHERS

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES
Committee of Ministers

During the course of 2011, the Secretariat of the Committee of Ministers provided the necessary administrative and intellectual support to the Committee of Ministers to enable it to carry out its functions. This included preparing the necessary documentation, drafts and briefings for the successive Chairmanships, the annual Ministerial Session in Istanbul, 40 meetings of the Ministers’ Deputies, 24 meetings of the Bureau, 91 meetings of subsidiary groups, numerous informal consultations and high-level meetings with other international organisations.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

2 784

2 784

(227)

2 557

2 554

3

91.7%

99.9%

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES
Secretary General, Deputy Secretary General and Private Office

“What went well” – tangible results

Top priority was again in 2011 to the Secretary General’s reform, with very tangible results. New strategic priorities for the decade were endorsed at the Ministerial Session held in May 2011.

The Council of Europe policy towards its immediate neighbourhood was developed.

The co-operation with external partners continued to intensify, exemplified by close and regular contacts with top officials of the European Union.

As main reform items, the intergovernmental committee structure and the Secretariat of the Council of Europe was reorganised.

A review of the Council of Europe Conventions was launched and the civil society participation at the Council of Europe was re-examined.

The Conferences of Specialised Ministers were the subject of a new Resolution by the Committee of Ministers.

A new biennial Programme and Budget 2012-2013 was adopted in November 2011.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The year 2011 included an important number of reform measures. On some instances, the implementation of reform has proven time-consuming. The management and decentralisation to field offices require extensive harmonisation and new procedures.

Some reform measures, including post suppressions and Secretariat restructuring, met in part with some understandable concern among staff.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The reform and other measures taken in 2011 have a profound impact on the functioning and future of the Organisation (including new strategic priorities for the decade and a new Secretariat structure). In difficult economic circumstances, the member States accorded the Council of Europe a first ever, biennial budget based on zero real growth. This is a very clear acknowledgment of the on-going reform process.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

2 658

2 658

363

3 021

2 986

35

112.3%

98.8%

Explanation for variances: Additional operational resources were needed due to heavy load of unforeseen, politically essential missions for the Secretary General and the Deputy Secretary General (90 K) and to carry out a study on Financial reporting (60 K). Also additional staff resources were needed for the reform.

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES

Protocol

“What went well” – tangible results

There was a smooth organisation of official events, visits and ceremonies, which contributed to good results.

Successful co-operation with customs and fiscal authorities saved money for the Organisation.

Information on fiscal privileges was shared with colleagues which allowed them to act in due time.

The Improved Protocol website allowed staff and Permanent Representations to easily find most frequently required information.

During the year, there was excellent co-operation with the European Parliament and regional/local authorities.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

802

802

27

829

823

6

102.6%

99.3%

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES

External Relations

“What went well” – tangible results

Relations between the Council of Europe and the European Union were consolidated at both political and technical levels. The main developments in 2011 with respect to relations with the European Union were progress in meeting the requirements of the Lisbon Treaty which foresees that the European Union shall accede to the European Convention on Human Rights; the signing of a €4.8 M regional programme to promote political and democratic reform in the Southern Neighbourhood countries, as part of the strategic partnership between the European Union and the Council of Europe; and the further reinforcement of the Council of Europe’s Office in Brussels.

2011 was marked by the development of a Council of Europe policy towards its neighbouring regions. At the 121st. Ministerial session, the Committee of Ministers took note of proposals made by the Secretary General and invited him to draw up plans for their implementation, with a view to their approval by the Committee of Ministers. By the end of 2011, “Neighbourhood Co-operation Dialogue” has progressed with Morocco, Tunisia, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, and through PACE, with the Palestinian National Authority. The Assembly has also granted “partner for democracy” status to the Moroccan Parliament and the Palestinian National Council. Based on this political dialogue, European Union-financed “Draft Neighbourhood Co-operation Priorities” have been prepared for Morocco, Tunisia and Kazakhstan.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

With respect to our relations with the European Union and with other international organisations, the Council of Europe’s added value consists of its pan-European dimension, its legally-binding standards and norms, its monitoring procedures and working methods.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 684

1 538

(115)

1 423

1 352

71

87.9%

95.0%

Explanation for variances: Several posts remained vacant during part of the year.

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES

Communications

“What went well” – tangible results

Political communications were improved through placing features and interviews with the Secretary General in key international media including the BBC, the Financial Times, the Economist, the International Herald Tribune, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and Le Monde on a limited number of key issues (integration, minorities, media freedom, co-operation with the European Union).

Awareness of “what the Council of Europe does” with decision makers and the media was increased by reducing the number of media releases and focusing communications on priority topics.

European Union exposure for Council of Europe content was improved through press briefings organised with the Brussels Office, specific co-ordinated messages with the Commission and through the monthly ‘Gutenberg’ column in “New Europe”.

The new web hub was successfully launched in May and the Council of Europe’s social media presence was increased.

The Council of Europe’s corporate identity was reinforced on publications throughout the Organisation: the Visual Identity Manual was revised and publicised; its requirements were implemented thanks to meetings with many entities, including our institutions.

The requests for free publications were centralised within the Directorate of Communication (DC) through a workflow system, in order to improve their quality and relevance.

Concerted DC action around the publication of the Group of Eminent Persons’ report: placement of opinion editorials in media across Europe; emailing to 17 000 addressees; Web and social media promotion; preparation of national events.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The streamlining of the Council of Europe editorial programme of publications has still to be improved: the newly created Committee for the rationalisation of printed and electronic publications involving all Directorates General will help to achieve this goal (two meetings in 2011).

The Council of Europe’s corporate identity reinforcement has to be implemented for online communication throughout the Directorates and in co-operation with them.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

6 141

6 141

103

6 244

6 234

10

101.5%

99.8%

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES

Political Advice, Policy Planning and External Presence

“What went well” – tangible results

Political Advice

Two types of activities, (i) advice provided to the Secretary General, the Committee of Ministers and to other organs of the Council of Europe, and (ii) monitoring and stocktaking activities, contributed to defining priority areas for action and for the messages of the Secretary General and the Committee of Ministers. The Directorate of Political Advice also helped to identify forthcoming challenges for the Organisation and its member States. Country-specific monitoring and stocktaking exercises continued to help define priorities of co-operation with a number of member States.

Policy Planning

Analysis of trends in Europe and beyond, and their relevance to and impact on the Organisation’s challenges and strategies, helped to forge the future direction of the Organisation.

Reinforced co-operation between Major Administrative Entities was facilitated through meetings addressing specific political concerns. The democracy debates encouraged the Secretariat and Delegations to reflect on the ideas and concepts needed to reinvigorate democracy. Discussion in member States of the Report of the Group of Eminent Persons Living together, Combining Diversity and Freedom in 21st-Century Europe is enhancing the debate on democracy. New networks amongst decision-makers have been fostered, in particular meetings between member States’ policy planners.

External Presence

The implementation of the external presence reform lead to enhanced core teams in the field and an expansion in extra-budgetary receipts, which increased by 22.9% compared to 2010 to approximately €36.4 M. This was the result of inter alia better co-ordination efforts and synergies between headquarters and Council of Europe Offices in needs identification and donor relations and a more efficient co-ordination with national authorities.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Political Advice

The preparation of the priority action plans of co-operation should be connected with monitoring and stocktaking exercises.

Policy Planning

The innovative discussion formats introduced by the Directorate of Policy Planning are only gradually reaping benefits as institutional change takes time.

A start was made in building links with research institutes and think-tanks but efforts need to be stepped up. A Committee of Ministers decision to allow staff members from such institutions to apply for secondments would facilitate such exchanges.

External Presence

Whilst the administrative aspect of the implementation of the external presence was completed the full functioning of co-ordination and consultation between headquarters and the field remained a challenge.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Political Advice

The Programme and Budget 2012-2013 foresees the continuation of monitoring and stocktaking exercises in relation to a number of countries. The implementation is overseen by the Rapporteur Group on Democracy (GR-DEM).

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

Political Advice

Monitoring and stocktaking exercises represent a unique opportunity for dialogue between the Committee of Ministers and a number of countries with a view to fulfilling their specific commitments and to fine-tuning priorities for co-operation. During missions in the field intensive contacts and consultations take place with the European Union, OSCE and UN representations, especially in order to avoid duplication of activities.

Policy Planning

It is expected that the OSCE-Council of Europe study underway will further reinforce co-operation between the two organisations.

External Presence

The full implementation of the external presence reform will be key in ensuring the best synergies between the different partner organisations present in the field.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

5 636

5 149

232

5 381

5 305

76

103.0%

98.6%

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES
Legal Advice

In 2011 the Directorate of Legal Advice and Public International Law (DLAPIL) issued 417 Legal Opinions, concerning all sectors of activities of the Council of Europe and drafted six Memoranda of Understanding with member States regarding the external offices in those states. In addition it assisted with the negotiations of a number of important contracts with service providers, particularly in the IT field. It plays an important role in the Tenders Board, as well as in activities regarding outside voluntary contributions. It was also heavily solicited in the context of the reform of the Organisation. At the same time, it dealt with 95 administrative complaints and provided the legal defence of the Secretary General in 46 appeals filed before the Administrative Tribunal. It prepared 181 letters, observations and memoranda in relation to the complaints and appeals treated during the year and appeared in nine hearings before the Administrative Tribunal. Legal Advice provided the secretariat to the Advisory Panel of Experts on Candidates for Election as Judge to the European Court of Human Rights and to the Board of the Celestina Foundation. DLAPIL participated actively in the negotiations relating to four new Conventions (domestic violence, Medicrime, the accession of the European Union to the European Convention on Human Rights and 4th Protocol to the Extradition Convention) providing legal impetus to the procedures and delivering legal opinions on the respective drafts.

The Treaty Office organised two ceremonies of opening for signature in Istanbul (May) and Moscow (October), concerning, respectively, the Convention on domestic violence and the Convention on counterfeiting of medicines and, in co-operation with the OECD, organised the ceremony of signatures of the joint Convention on Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters in the margins of the Cannes G20 meeting. Besides, it prepared 89 signatures, 77 ratifications / accessions and dealt with two denunciations, 161 reservations / declarations / objections and 23 accessions and five withdrawals to or from partial / enlarged agreements, by individual states. Furthermore, it dealt with the procedure for treating 11 requests by non-member States to accede to Council of Europe Conventions, eight of which led to an invitation by the CM. It issued 170 notifications and responded to 130 requests for information relating to Council of Europe treaties or agreements.

The Treaty Office website was consulted more than a million times (85,000 consultations per month on average). It was modernised and made more easily accessible in September 2011.

Four new Council of Europe Conventions, which entered into force in 2011 were registered with the UN Legal Services.

The deadline for submitting to the Committee of Ministers the Secretary General report on the Review of Council of Europe’s Conventions was extended with a view to enabling CAHDI to prepare a detailed opinion. As a consequence, discussions on possible activities to promote Council of Europe’s conventions – an issue to be dealt with under that report – were also delayed.

The Service of Legal Advice co-operates with the legal advisors of co-ordinated organisations, as well as of other international organisations, to share experience and knowledge with a view to improving its services.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 089

1 089

4

1 093

1 075

18

98.7%

98.4%

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES
Internal Oversight

“What went well” – tangible results

The Directorate of Internal Oversight (DIO) successfully conducted one of the most challenging evaluations so far in terms of its complexity and political nature. This concerned the phase I of the evaluation of the Ukraine Action Plan 2008-2011, financed by the Swedish International Development Agency, which was submitted to the Rapporteur Group on Democracy on 5 July 2011 for the discussions of the new Action Plan. This report was instrumental in initiating discussions and reflections within the Secretariat on how to improve further the preparation process of Action Plans and Country Planning Documents.

One of the highlights of the year was the special evaluation event organised by the Chair of the Rapporteur Group on Programme, Budget and Administration (GR-PBA), Ambassador Irma Ertman, in co-operation with DIO on 6 June. High-level experts in the field of evaluation from the European Union, the United Nations and the European Evaluation Society participated in the panel discussion along with the newly appointed Director of DIO.

Two major operational audits concentrated on Project Management and Reporting Requirements and looked into two key management issues in the Organisation while producing a significant number of proposed improvements. In the domain of Corporate Governance, Internal Audit produced a policy and rule to promote awareness and the prevention of fraud and corruption. These were brought into force in January 2011.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The long term absence of the former Director slowed down progress, in particular, during the carrying out of the evaluation of the Ukraine Action Plan. Moreover, high levels of staff turnover and sickness absence affected the ability to deliver the target number of audit reports.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Preliminary findings of the Phase I of the evaluation of the Ukraine Action Plan were presented during the External Presence Co-ordination Group’s special meeting on Country Planning Documents, chaired by the Private Office of the Secretary General, with a view to contributing to the brainstorming on improving Council of Europe's approach to country-level programming. At the Rapporteur Group on Democracy meeting mentioned above, some delegations used the opportunity to ask about the state of implementation of the recommendations included in this report.

Council of Europe Added Value and co-operation with other Organisations

The year 2011 was a fruitful year for co-operation with other Organisations such as the OECD, UNESCO, OSCE, UNIDO, the Council of Europe Development Bank and the European Commission. The Council of Europe became an institutional member of the European Evaluation Society. The membership gives access to a body of knowledge and network of professionals, involved in evaluation in Europe and elsewhere.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

1 019

1 019

(8)

1 011

997

14

97.8%

98.6%

Extra-budgetary resources

Voluntary contributions

Project

Database
Reference

Beneficiary

Total
Cost

Requirements
for 2011

Secured
by 12/11

Donors

Support and evaluation of the Council of Europe Action Plan for Ukraine.

2011/Audit/
VC/2617

Ukraine

500

500

500

Sweden

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES
Administration, Human resources, Programme, finance and linguistic services

“What went well” – tangible results (not activities)

Administration

The Administration actively contributed to the reform process by adapting internal regulations to meet the current and future needs of the Organisation, including the delegation of staff management powers to the Registrar of the European Court of Human Rights and the simplification of procurement procedures.

As regards modernisation, it developed a workforce planning methodology so as to anticipate the Organisation’s needs in terms of human resources and best meet its future challenges. It also reviewed the traineeship policy with a view to rationalising it.

Human Resources

The Directorate of Human Resources played an active role in the implementation of the reorganisation of the Secretariat.

Innovative training methods were introduced, allowing a large number of staff to follow high-impact courses thus increasing cost-efficiency.

Measures were taken to reduce or suppress non-coordinated allowances in order to control salary expenses.

Programme, Finance and Linguistic Services

In the area of programme and budget, a new Progress Review Report system was introduced in line with the new Programme and Budget approach and structure. The legal frameworks of the conferences of specialised ministers and intergovernmental committees were reviewed to enhance the focus of their work and synergies with the Committee of Ministers. The Financial Regulations were revised in line with requirements linked to the biennial cycle and modernised, notably in the light of the External Auditor’s recommendations. The first biennial Programme and Budget was adopted, starting in 2012, and budgeting tools adapted accordingly.

The 2010 Financial Statements were provided to the External Auditor within the prescribed deadlines. For the fourth consecutive year, they gave an unqualified opinion certifying them as IPSAS (International Public Sector Accounting Standards) compliant. They were then approved by the Committee of Ministers. The assigned deadline for the payment of the Organisations’ creditors was fully respected for suppliers and compliance of the Service Level Agreement for experts’ reimbursements improved.

Concerning linguistic services, some 126,000 pages were translated (3.5% up on the 2010 figure, and 21% above the estimate published in the 2011 budget) and interpretation was provided for 1054 meetings. Furthermore, a Code of Ethics for court interpreters was drafted as well as framework agreements concluded for the provision of interpretation-related services in the field.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

Human Resources

Agreeing with staff on a common approach regarding internal regulations remains difficult. In addition, the 209th CCR report on expatriation was imposed by the CCR despite strong opposition of the five Secretaries General which might have negative consequences on recruiting expatriate staff from 2012 onwards.

Programme, Finance and Linguistic Services

For official journeys, the percentage of reimbursements made within the assigned deadline fell due to the turnover of experienced staff and the reduction of the deadlines from 25 days to 20 days, yet remained over 80%.

The various changes in the structure of the programme and budget and those resulting from the reform of the Organisation brought significant stress on the IT financial systems.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

Programme, Finance and Linguistic Services

The experience gained in 2011 will be useful in developing a more effective system for the follow-up of the implementation of the programme and budget, including inter alia the introduction of an interim progress review report resulting from the revised financial regulations. This process will be facilitated by the constant and active dialogue established with programme coordinators and secretaries of intergovernmental committees in 2011.

Council of Europe added value and co-operation with other organisations

Human Resources

The Council of Europe pursued its co-operation with the Coordinated Organisations. It also organised the International Organisations Pensions Workshop in Strasbourg.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

14 938

14 938

(753)

14 185

13 858

327

92.8%

97.7%

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES
Logistics

“What went well” – tangible results

Overall, projects funded both by the Ordinary budget and the Investment budget were carried out within the set times and allocated budgets.

Maintenance operations and renovation work, notably on the Palais de l’Europe control centre, helped maintain the value of the real estate assets, thus contributing to sustainable development.

In respect of Council of Europe offices, the Brussels Liaison Office was set up in new premises and expert assessment missions to offices in the field resulted in increased safety and improved working conditions for the staff concerned.

Document production remained stable in spite of a drop in black and white printing.

Satisfaction rates for DLOG services were largely on the increase.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

The renewal of the access control project has been delayed and has gone well beyond budget, which is due in part to additional requests from system users.

The lack of a policy for expert assessment missions to the field means that needs are addressed differently and working conditions differ from one office to another. A consistent and coordinated policy is called for.

The late transmission of information on internal removals required as a result of the restructuring meant that they were carried out in a rushed fashion at the end of 2011. Such information should be provided well in advance so that proper planning can be made.

Customs problems with dispatches to non-European Union countries and the late delivery of purchases made outside France were experienced.

Impact of 2011 programme on the Programme and Budget 2012-2013

The work carried out in 2011 will contribute to future energy savings.

The expert assessment missions carried out to the field in 2011 will provide a basis to help meet the future needs of operational directorates.

Council of Europe added value and co-operation with other organisations

Benchmarking with the United Nations worldwide and with international organisations in Europe was carried out.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

21 900

21 900

459

22 359

22 116

243

101.0%

98.9%

GOVERNING BODIES AND GENERAL SERVICES
Information Technologies

“What went well” – tangible results

The Directorate of Information and Technology managed to cope with a significant increase in demand in standard services and specific requests without it affecting the overall quality of its services. This did not lead either to an increase in expenditure and user satisfaction remained high (above the 90% agreed level).

Three major value adding programmes were delivered: the new Internet Hub, a real time Council of Europe country information reporting tool and the Document and Records Management system in pilot entities.

“What did not go well” – together with lessons learnt for the future/actions to be taken in future

A major difficulty is matching existing staff competencies with fast-changing technology and user demands. In certain cases, this is managed by resorting to outsourcing but this solution cannot make up entirely for the lack of in-house skills.

Council of Europe added value and co-operation with other organisations

The Directorate is present in the European Information Group.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

9 380

9 380

222

9 602

9 594

8

102.3%

99.9%

GOVERNING BODIES, GENERAL SERVICES AND OTHER
Other expenditure

Investments

The amount under this budget line represented the grant to the Investment programme of the Organisation.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

4 665

4 665

4 665

4 665

100.0%

100.0%

Staff Committee, Amicale and Administrative Tribunal

The amount under this programme line covered:

- The cost of two staff members working for the Staff Committee, together with translation, interpretation and official journeys of staff committee members to meetings with representatives of other international organisations, in particular those within the Coordination system.

- The grant from the Organisation to the staff Amicale

- The cost of two staff members working for the Administrative Tribunal together with interpretation, document costs, travel and subsistence expenses and allowances for members of the Tribunal and official journeys.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

476

476

-

476

468

8

98.3%

98.3%

Common Provisions and Other

Appropriations under this budget line covered:

    · Provisions for placement of national civil servants on secondment;

    · Provision for additional languages;

    · Reserve for field missions / Contingency Reserve;

    · Provision for joint programmes;

    · Grant to the special account Early termination of service of permanent staff;

    · External audit;

    · Council of Europe contribution to the administrative costs of the management of pensions;

    · Audit Committee.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

2 121

2 121

(828)

1 293

1 228

65

57.9%

95.0%

Explanation for variances: The initial appropriations included the Joint Programme provision (62 K) and the provision for secondments (906 K). Most of these provisions were allocated to the relevant programme lines.

Negative Reserve

The negative reserve was created in order to ensure an overall balance of the budget whilst allowing for flexible budgetary management. The negative reserve was significantly reduced between 2011 and 2012 from €571 K to €371 K and will be fully suppressed in 2013.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

(571)

(571)

-

(571)

-

(571)

   

RECEIPTS – ORDINARY BUDGET

The Receipts of the Organisation other than obligatory contributions of member States comprise the following items:

Interest – Due to the delay in payment of some member States’ contributions, unforeseen receipts amounting to €242 K were registered in 2011.

Recoveries – This budget line covered the fixed sum contribution towards the Ordinary Budget of the Organisation by Partial Agreements.

Sundry Receipts – This budget line covered mainly: charges for use of car parking, French social security reimbursements, services recharged to the audiovisual observatory. The actual sundry receipts are €156 K higher than foreseen.

Budgetary resources

Approved
budget

Initial Budget (without GME)

Transfers

Final Budget
(after transfers
without GME)

Expenditure

Balance

Percentage
(Initial budget)

Percentage
(Final
Budget)

5 569

5 569

5 569

5 971

(402)

107.2%

107.2%

 

APPENDICES

Appendix I – Ordinary budget summary of expenditure

Appendix II – Voluntary contributions: summary table

* This amount includes actual receipts and commitments under signed contracts by December 2011.


Appendix III – Summary of joint programmes 2011


ACRONYMS

ALDE Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe

ALECSO Arab League Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization

AML/CFT Anti-money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism

BBC British Broadcasting Corporation

CAHAMA Ad hoc European Committee for the World Anti-Doping Agency

CAHDI Committee of Legal Advisers on Public International Law

CAHROM Ad hoc Committee of Experts on Roma issues

CAHVIO Ad Hoc Committee on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence

CALRE Conference of European Regional Legislative Assemblies

CAR-Serbia Capacity building of the Directorate for Confiscated Property and improvement of the system for criminal asset confiscation in Serbia (Joint Programme)

CBM Confidence Building Measures

CCDB Common Cardholders’ Database

CCJE Consultative Council of European Judges

CCPE Consultative Council of European Prosecutors

CCR Co-ordinating Committee on Remuneration

CDAP Conference of Directors of Prison Administration

CDCJ European Committee on Legal Co-operation

CDCPP Steering Committee for Culture, Heritage and Landscape

CDCS Committee for Social Cohesion

CDDH Steering Committee for Human Rights

CDEG Steering Committee for Equality between Women and Men

CDL European Commission for Democracy through Law

CDLR European Committee on Local and Regional Democracy

CDMSI Steering Committee on Media and Information Society

CDPC European Committee on Crime Problems

CDPPE Steering Committee for Educational Policy and Practice

CDSP European Health Committee

CEB Council of Europe Development Bank

CEE/CIS Central Eastern Europe/Commonwealth of Independent States

CEMR Council of European Municipalities and Regions

CEP Certificate of suitability to the monographs of the European Pharmacopoeia

CEPEJ European Commission for the Efficiency of Justice

CEPs Compliance Enhancing Procedures

CERD Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

CETS Council of Europe Treaty Series

CIS Commonwealth of Independent States

CJ-S-PR Group of Specialists on the Role of Public Prosecutors outside the criminal field

CMIS Content Management Interoperability Services

CODEXTER Committee of Experts on Terrorism

CODICES Infobase on Constitutional Case-Law of the Venice Commission

CoE Council of Europe

CommHR Commissioner for Human Rights

COP Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime and on the Financing of Terrorism

COTER European Union Working Party on Terrorism

CPCs Criminal Procedure Codes

CPT European Committee for the Prevention of Torture

CS-RPD Committee of Experts on the rights of people with disabilities

CWE CultureWatchEurope

DC Directorate of Communications

DD Documents distributed to all Delegations at the request of a Permanent Representation,

DG I Directorate General of Democracy and Political Affairs

DG II Directorate General of Democracy

DG III Directorate General of Social Cohesion

DG IV Directorate General of Education, Culture and Heritage, Youth and Sport

DGDPA Directorate General of Democracy and Political Affairs

DGHL Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal Affairs

DIO Directorate of Internal Oversight

DLAPIL Directorate of Legal Advice and Public International Law

DLOG Directorate of Logistics

DPP Donor Programme Partner

DRT Document review tool

EaP Eastern Partnership

EASPD European Association of Service Providers for Persons with Disabilities

EBU European Blind Union

EC European Commission

ECHR European Convention on Human Rights

ECLSG European Charter of Local Self-Government

ECML European Centre for Modern Languages

ECOWAS Economic Community Of West African States

ECRI European Commission against Racism and Intolerance

ECRML European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages

ECSR European Committee of Social Rights

ECSS European Code of Social Security

EDF European Disability Forum

EDG European Democrat Group

EDQM European Directorate for the Quality of Medicine

EEA European Economic Area

EFP Association “European Film Promotion”

EHDs European Heritage Days

ELDW European Local Democracy Week

EMCDDA European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction

ENPI European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument

EP European Parliament

EPA Enlarged Partial Agreement on Cultural Routes

EPAS Enlarged Partial Agreement on Sport

EPP/CD Group of the European People’s Party

EU European Union

EUD European Union of the Deaf

EuroDIG European Dialogue on Internet Governance

EUR-OPA European and Mediterranean Major Hazards Agreement

EVS European Voluntary Service programme

EYCA European Youth Card Association

EYF European Youth Foundation

FATF Financial Action Task Force

FCNM Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities

FFD Forum for the Future of Democracy

FIFA Fédération Internationale de Football Association

FRA European Union Fundamental Rights Agency

G20 Group of Twenty

G8 Group of Eight

GAC-ICANN Governmental Advisory Committee of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers

GME General Management Expenditure

GMP Good manufacturing practice

GR-DEM Rapporteur Group on Democracy

GRECO Group of States against Corruption

GRETA Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings

GR-PBA Rapporteur Group on Programme, Budget and Administration

HELP European Programme for Human Rights Education for Legal Professionals

HEREIN European Heritage Network

HRTF Human Rights Trust Fund

HUDOC Human Rights Documentation (ECHR database)

IACA International Anti-Corruption Academy

ICC INDEX Intercultural Cities Index

ICRC International Committee of the Red Cross

ICRS International Chemical Reference Substances

ICT Information and Communications Technology

IFES International Foundation for Electoral Systems

IGF Internet Governance Forum

ILO International Labour Organisation

IMF International Monetary Fund

INCB International Narcotics Control Board

INGOs International non-governmental organisations

IOM International Organization for Migration

IPA Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance

IPSAS International Public Sector Accounting Standards

ISA International Standards for Antibiotics

ISO International Organization for Standardization

IT Information Technology

ITFER International Task Force for the education of Roma

IUCN International Union for Conservation of Nature

JMA European Union/North-South Centre Joint Management Agreement

JP European Union/Council of Europe Joint Programme

LGBT Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (persons)

MARS Media Against Racism in Sport (Joint Programme)

MDAC Mental Disability Advocacy Centre

MHE Mental Health Europe

MOLI-Serbia Project against Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing and Economic Crime in Serbia (Joint Programme)

MONEYVAL Committee of Experts on the Evaluation of Anti-Money Laundering Measures and the Financing of Terrorism

NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization

NGO Non-governmental organisation

NPMs National preventive mechanisms

NSC North-South Centre

OAS Organization of American States

OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

OSCE Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe

OSCE/HCNM OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities

OSCE-ODHIR Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights of the European Commission, the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe

OSI/LGI Open Society Institute / Local Governance and Public Service Reform Initiative

PACA Project against Corruption in Albania

PACE Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe

PCDK Support to the Promotion of Cultural Diversity in Kosovo (Joint programme)

PECK Project against Economic Crime in Kosovo (Joint Programme)

Ph. Eur. European Pharmacopoeia

Ph. Eur. RS European Pharmacopoeia Reference Standards

PISA Programme for International Student Assessment

PPPs Public-private partnerships

REGLEG Conference of European regions with legislative power

RI Rehabilitation International

ROMED European Roma Mediators Training Programme

SATURN Study and Analysis of judicial Time Use Research Network

SEE South East Europe

SHE Strengthening Higher Education in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Joint Programme)

SME's Small and medium size enterprises

SOC Socialist Group

SPARDA Shaping Perceptions and Attitudes to Realise the Diversity Advantage (Joint Programme)

SPIRAL Societal Progress Indicators and Responsibilities for all

SSR Social Shared Responsibilities

T-CY Cybercrime Convention Committee

the Secretariat or others

ToT Training-of-trainers

UEFA Union of European Football Associations

UEL Group of the Unified European Left

UN OHCHR United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

UN United Nations

UN-CAT United Nations Convention Against Torture

UNDP United Nations Development Programme

UNEP United Nations Environment Programme

UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

UNHCR United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

UNICEF United Nations Children’s Fund

UNIDO United Nations Industrial Development Organization

UNMIK United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo

UNODC United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime

UN-SPT United Nations Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

UPR United Nations Universal Periodic Review

US United States

USA United States of America

USAID United States Agency for International Development

VC Voluntary Contribution

WADA World Anti-Doping Agency

WHO World Health Organization


1 The term “Roma” used at the Council of Europe refers to Roma, Sinti, Kale and related groups in Europe, including Travellers and the Eastern groups (Dom and Lom), and covers the wide diversity of the groups concerned, including persons who identify themselves as “Gypsies”.

2 List of Recommendations of the Committee of Ministers to member States adopted in 2011:
· CM/Rec(2011)1 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on interaction between migrants and receiving societies.

· CM/Rec(2011)2 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on validating migrants' skills.

· CM/Rec(2011)3 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on the principle of autonomy of sport in Europe.

· CM/Rec(2011)4 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on education for global interdependence and solidarity.

· CM/Rec(2011)5 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on reducing the risk of vulnerability of elderly migrants and improving their welfare.

· CM/Rec(2011)6 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on intercultural dialogue and the image of the other in history teaching.

· CM/Rec(2011)7 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on a new notion of media.

· CM/Rec(2011)8 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on the protection and promotion of the universality, integrity and openness of the Internet.

· CM/Rec(2011)9 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on fostering social mobility as a contribution to social cohesion.

· CM/Rec(2011)10 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on promotion of the integrity of sport against manipulation of results notably match-fixing.

· CM/Rec(2011)11 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on the funding by higher-level authorities of new competences for local authorities.

· CM/Rec(2011)12 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on children's rights and social services friendly to children and families.

· CM/Rec(2011)13 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on mobility, migration and access to health care.

· CM/Rec(2011)14 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on the participation of persons with disabilities in political and public life.

3 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

4 The United Kingdom withdrew from the Pompidou Group on 1 January 2011.

5 See CM/Del/Dec(2010)1090/11.1.

6 Of which €240 K from interests on late payment of member States’ contributions.

7 The GME is the expenditure related to central and coordinating services in a Major Administrative Entity including the Director General and/or Director/s and central services.

8 See DD(2012)82

9 1075th meeting, document DD(2010)22 rev.

10 1106th meeting, document DD(2011)112.

11 See SG/Inf(2011)3 final.

12 See SG/Inf(2011)12 rev.

13 See SG/Inf(2011)2 final.

14 See SG/Inf(2011)9 final.

15 See CM/Res(2011)7.

16 See document CM(2012)34

17 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

18 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

19 Human Rights Trust Fund: the contributors to HRTF are Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway , Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

20 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

21 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

22 The five political groups are: Group of the European People’s Party (EPP/CD); Socialist Group (SOC); European Democrat Group (EDG); Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE); Group of the Unified European Left (UEL).

23 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

24 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

25 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

26 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

27 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

28 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

29 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

30 All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.



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