Information Document

SG/Inf(2011)9 FINAL

3 May 2011

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PROPOSAL BY THE SECRETARY GENERAL

REFORM
PROPOSED NEW SET-UP FOR INTERGOVERNMENTAL STRUCTURES

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1. Background

The present proposals concern exclusively the committees which have been established in accordance with Resolution (2005) 47 of the Committee of Ministers1. Their main purpose is to create the conditions for the Committee of Ministers to take full strategic responsibility over intergovernmental work, whilst maintaining the work of the steering committees as an essential link with the specialised ministries.

These proposals are also in line with the outline of priorities 2012-2013 as proposed by the Secretary General. They intend to contribute to create the appropriate structures for the Council of Europe to realise the Organisation’s priorities as set out in the programmes of activities, as they will be adopted by the Committee of Ministers as from 2012 onwards.

Appendices I and II show the proposed intergovernmental set-up and the existing one.

1.1. Criteria applied

    · Political relevance: ensure political relevance in terms of the key priorities for the Organisation and high level attendance by member states;
    · Pan-European dimension: promote intergovernmental dialogue and exchange at the pan-European level;
    · Committee of Ministers responsibility: allow for better interaction between the Committee of Ministers and Steering Committees in implementing key priorities;
    · Rationalisation of intergovernmental structures: set-up Steering Committees with over-arching responsibility for a priority sector, thus allowing them to exert a true steering role;
    · Streamlining of subordinate structures: time-limited, no automatic renewal or prolongation, clear mandate linked to the programme cycle;

1.2. Revised structures
All Steering Committees will receive new terms of reference from the Committee of Ministers as from 1 January 2012. The role of these bodies will be based on the strategic priority axes, and will be linked to the two year programming cycle so as to allow the Committee of Ministers to create/discontinue or adapt their terms of reference to priorities/ new challenges on a regular basis.

The Steering Committees will in certain cases have a larger thematic responsibility in comparison to the past.

To deal with some specific subjects, the Committees may be supported by newly-created subordinate structures2. The terms of reference of these subordinate structures will also be adopted by the Committee of Ministers.

All Steering Committees and subordinate structures will be priority driven. Accordingly, the Steering Committees resulting from mergers will not necessarily be the addition of the previous committees and mandates; hence, the need for the new structures to receive new mandates from the Committee of Ministers. The number of meetings of the committees resulting from mergers will be determined so as to ensure that they meet sufficiently often to efficiently steer activities under their responsibility.

The main mission on which the mandates of the new steering committees and of the European Committee for Social Cohesion (CDCS) should be based is shown in appendix III. It should be noted that this information does not prevent any decision that the Committee of Ministers may take when adopting the Terms of Reference of these new bodies.

The detailed Terms of Reference of all steering committees and subordinate structures, including those which will remain unchanged, will be approved by the Committee of Ministers at the latest in the framework of the adoption of the budget and the programme of activities 2012-2013.

Subordinate structures will only be set up under clearly defined conditions:

    · With a clear objective and mandate;
    · Linked to a specific priority activity (cease to exist upon completion);
    · Limited to maximum two year programming cycle (no automatic renewal or prolongation).

They will take one of the following formats:

    · Governmental experts of the 47 member states (e.g. with a specific mandate to prepare a new legal instrument) ;
    · Open-ended structures with a limited number of governmental experts where there is no need to have the 47 member states represented;
    · Experts/ consultant(s) with a specific and limited mandate;
    · Any combination of the above options.

Working methods are a key element in improving the functioning of the intergovernmental structures. Members of committees should benefit from interactive new technologies to supplement meetings and maximise the potential of their networks. Better and more frequent use of information technologies (such as video conferences and secured shared workspaces’) should offset the limited number of meetings. To this end, field offices will also play a role and be adequately equipped.

The travel expenses of the participants to intergovernmental committee meetings will continue to be reimbursed in accordance with the Regulations in force at present.

2. proposed new intergovernmental setup

The new intergovernmental design reflects the outline of priorities 2012-2013 as presented by the Secretary General, and not the Secretariat structures:

    - Pillar I: Human Rights

            § Protection and promotion of human rights

    - Pillar II: Rule of Law

            § Challenges to the rule of law
            § Development of pan-European common standards and policies
            § Justice

    - Pillar III: Democracy

            § Democratic Governance
            § Sustainable democratic societies

Together with the treaty-based activities (including monitoring mechanisms) and with those implemented by the Council of Europe’s Institutions (Commissioner for Human Rights, Parliamentary Assembly, Congress) the new intergovernmental design will be an integral part of the Council of Europe institutional architecture, notwithstanding any future decision on Secretariat structures.

The proposed line for reporting to Rapporteur Groups is shown in the appendix III.

Pillar I: human rights

2.1. Protection and promotion of human rights

The Steering Committee for Human Rights (CDDH) will supervise a wide range of human rights-related issues, thus ensuring consistency in this field of work. In order to perform its tasks, it will be supported by four subordinate structures dealing with:

      - The Reform of the European Court of Human Rights (Interlaken process) and EU accession;
      - Bioethics: a Committee on Bioethics gathering 47 member states representatives, will report to the CDDH;
      - Gender equality: a Gender Equality Commission - advisory body of specialists - will be set up, acting in close relation with focal points in member states. Its main function will be to promote the mainstreaming of gender equality issues in the work of other Council of Europe bodies, to promote exchange of good practices and to support the implementation of the existing standards in member states.

As in other fields of work, the Committee of Ministers might be invited to set-up ad-hoc subordinate structures to the CDDH to develop new standards in the human rights field, following identification of new needs in this respect.

Pillar II: Rule of Law

2.1. Challenges to the rule of law

The Committee of Experts on Terrorism (CODEXTER) will be maintained in its current format.

2.2. Development of Pan-European common standards and policies/ Justice

The European Committee on Crime Problems (CDPC) and the European Committee on Legal Co-operation (CDCJ) will remain unchanged.

The European Committee on Crime problems will continue to be supported by the following subordinate structures:

- The Committee of Experts on the operation of European Conventions on co-operation in criminal matters (PC-OC), which will be maintained in its current format.

- The Council for Penological Co-operation (PC-CP), which will be maintained in its current format.

A Steering Committee on Information Society (CDSI) will take responsibility over information society related-issues (such as media, internet governance, data protection).

The Consultative Council of European Judges (CCJE) and the Consultative Council of European Prosecutors (CCPE) will be maintained in their current format.

The Committee of Legal advisers on Public International Law (CAHDI) will be maintained in its current format.

Pillar III: Democracy

Democratic governance and sustainable democratic societies

The Council of Europe’s Education Programme will be overseen by a single newly-created Steering Committee for Education Policy and Practice (CDPPE), resulting from merging the Steering Committee for Education (CDED) and the Steering Committee for Higher Education and Research (CDESR). It will be composed by one high level State representative exercising responsibility for education policy. An aspect of co-management will be introduced through a Joint Council on Education (CME) bringing together government representatives with the education community.

A new Steering Committee on Cultural Diversity and Intercultural Dialogue (CDDI) will be set up. It will result from merging the Steering Committee for Culture (CDCULT) and the Steering Committee for Cultural Heritage and Landscape (CDPATEP) and will have a larger mandate to address cultural diversity and intercultural dialogue with an innovative approach, which will be defined by the Committee of Ministers.

The European Committee for Social Cohesion (CDCS) will provide guidance, ensure co-ordination and supervise activities in this field, particularly through the implementation and promotion of two key instruments: the New Strategy for Social Cohesion and the Action Plan for Social Cohesion. The Committee will contribute to the development of national social policies and to identifying new challenges to social cohesion, in particular on the basis on the work of the European Social Charter.

The Committee’s work will be supported by a subordinate structure replacing the European Co-ordination Forum for the Council of Europe Disability Action Plan 2006 – 2015 (CAHPAH) which will be set-up as a lighter implementation mechanism, until the end of the Action Plan.

In order to achieve greater coherence, the Committee of Experts on Social Security (CS-SS), presently a subordinate structure to the CDCS will be merged with the Governmental Committee of the Social Charter3. The tasks currently assigned to the Committee of Experts on Social Security (CS-SS)4 regarding the supervision of the European Code of Social Security, should be fulfilled as from 2012 by the Governmental Committee of the Social Charter.

This merger will be carried out while fully respecting the status of both legal instruments. The Committee of Ministers would be invited to adopt a Resolution entrusting the Governmental Committee of the Charter to supervise the implementation of the European Code of social security as from 1 January 2012. The name of the Governmental Committee would be changed to reflect this new function. Furthermore, the agendas of the meetings of the Governmental Committee would be organised so as to facilitate expert participation from member states. Complementary information on this merger can be found in Appendix IV.

The Steering Committee on Local and Regional Democracy (CDLR) will continue the work of the Council of Europe in this field at the intergovernmental level. Its main challenge in 2012-2013 will be to take forward the Chaves review of the Council of Europe’s activities in the field of local and regional democracy in close co-operation with the Congress, the Parliamentary Assembly and relevant non governmental organisations.

The European Steering Committee for Youth (CDEJ) and the Advisory Council on Youth (CCJ) will be maintained as they stand today, including the co-management dimension through the Joint Council on Youth (CMJ).

The Terms of Reference of the Ad hoc Committee of Experts on Roma Issues (CAHROM) were adopted by the Committee of Ministers’ Deputies in 2011, as a concrete follow-up to the high level meeting on Roma of 20 October 2010. In 2012-2013, this new Committee will remain as recently established.

The Ad hoc European Committee for the World Anti-Doping Agency (CAHAMA) will also continue in its current format. This co-ordination group is the only pan-European forum to provide input in the World Anti-doping Agency.

The European Health Committee (CDSP) will be discontinued. The Council of Europe will continue to deal with health matters through the European Committee for Social Cohesion and through relevant activities in the European Social Charter and under the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine. The activities relating to child-friendly health care will also be pursued as part of the transversal programme on children.

3. efficiency and cost

Current intergovernmental set-up (see appendix II)

      - 23 Steering Committees
      - 28 Subordinate structures

Cost: 3 524 800 €/ year5.

Proposed new intergovernmental set-up (see appendix I)

      - 16 Steering Committees
      - 6 Subordinate structures

Estimated cost based on merger and deletion of a number of structures: 2 600 000 €/ year6.

The difference will be devoted to ensuring the functioning of the new intergovernmental to reinforce priority areas as outlined in the document Priorities 2012-2013 and their budgetary implications 7.

APPENDIX III

Main mission of new steering committees

The information below does not prevent any decision that the Committee of Ministers may take when adopting the Terms of Reference of these new bodies. The detailed Terms of Reference of all steering committees and subordinate structures, including those which will remain unchanged, will be approved by the Committee of Ministers between the date of its decision concerning the new intergovernmental design and its entry into force at the latest in the framework of the adoption of the budget and the programme of activities 2012-2013.

Pillar I: Human Rights

Steering Committee for Human Rights (CDDH)

(Reporting line CM: GR-H)

Main mission:

- Implement intergovernmental activities on both protection and promotion of human rights and fundamental freedoms, two sectors which will remain the priority under the first operational pillar (Human Rights) of the biennium. This Committee will carry out central steering and oversight functions over the human rights intergovernmental work:

- set up common standards for the 47 member states with the aim of improving national implementation of the European Convention on Human Rights and the effectiveness of its control mechanism;
- develop and promote human rights in Europe;
- guarantee coherence and synergies in the development of human rights law and policy;
- proceed to substantive legal analysis of human rights issues and input in the development of Council of Europe policies on such issues;
- carry out any other activity which might be assigned to it by the CM (e.g. drafting opinions on recommendations by the Parliamentary Assembly or the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities);

To fulfil these tasks, the CDDH supervises and co-ordinates work of structures answerable to it in the fields of the Reform of the European Court of Human Rights, bioethics and gender equality.8

Activities to be supervised in 2012-2013:

Under the first pillar (Human Rights), the CDDH will play a leading role during the biennium in two priority sectors: “Protection of Human Rights” and “Promoting Human Rights”. In particular, it will supervise activities of the subordinate structures to be created on, respectively, the “Reform of the European Court of Human Rights (Reform of the ECtHR)” and “Gender Equality” as well as the activities of the Committee on Bioethics (CDBI).

Reform of the ECtHR: the CDDH will supervise activities aimed at securing the long term effectiveness and relevance of the ECHR system at national and European level. This work will be conducted as a follow-up to the Interlaken and Izmir Declarations9 and under CM instructions in 2012, expected to:

    a) extend, as necessary, relevant terms of reference of the CDDH (and its subordinate bodies) to complete its work on the Interlaken follow-up in the period up to 15 April 2012;
    b) give specific terms of reference to the CDDH thereafter, once the CM has examined the CDDH Final Report on specific proposals for measures requiring amendments of the Convention.

The CDDH is expecting to:

    a) analyse information to be provided by member states to the CM before the end of 2011 on their implementation of relevant parts of the Interlaken Declaration, notably to consider the possible need for further specific proposals for measures that do not require amendment of the European Convention of Human Rights;
    b) follow-up to the Interlaken Declaration’s call for evaluation 2012-2015 of the effects of Protocol No. 14 and implementation of the Declaration on the Court’s situation, as well as in any reflections on possible proposals for long-term reform of the Convention system that may take place during the 2012-2013 biennium.

    Bioethics: The CDDH will supervise activities at facilitating the implementation of the Convention on human rights and biomedicine and further developing its principles for the protection of fundamental rights in the field of biomedicine in particular in genetics, psychiatry, end of life situations, biomedical research and transplantation of organs and tissues.

    Gender equality: The CDDH will supervise the standard-setting work of the new CoE gender equality commission, as well as the latter’s input into draft CM replies to PACE recommendations.

    Composition of CDDH:
    Number of member states: 47 (2 or 3 meetings per year)
    Representatives of other International Organisations: 210
    Other participants and observers: representing other committees11, institutions12, non member states13 and non-governmental organisations
    Bureau of the CDDH: Chair + 7 members + (subject to the agenda) Chairs of the subordinate structures (2 or 3 meetings per year)

Subordinate Structures to the CDDH

Reform of ECtHR

Activities

Legal activities aimed at securing the long term effectiveness and relevance of the ECHR system at national and European level, by improving national implementation of the Convention and the effectiveness of the control mechanism established by it. This work is an important part of the follow-up to the Interlaken and Izmir Declarations14.

Under the instructions of the CDDH, the structures to be created will, in particular:

    - work on specific proposals for measures requiring the amendment of the Convention;
    - analyse the information to be provided by member states to the CM as part of the follow up to the Interlaken Declaration, with a view notably to considering the possible need for further specific proposals for measures that do not require amendment of the ECHR;
    - contribute to the evaluation of the effects of Protocol No. 14 to the Convention and implementation of the Interlaken Declaration on the Court’s situation, as well as in any reflections on possible proposals for long-term reform of the Convention system that may take place during the biennium.

Composition

Open-ended Committee of Experts on the Reform of the Court composed by [25] members and a number to be defined of representatives of other International Organisations, committees, institutions, non member states and non-governmental organisations.
Small open-ended Drafting Group composed by a reduced number of member states representatives to be defined, representatives of other International Organisations, committees, institutions, non member states and non-governmental organisations.

Bioethics

Activities

    - Preparation of draft legal instruments concerning:

          - the use of health related data for insurances purposes;
          - decision making process regarding medical treatment in end of life situations;
          - the protection of persons with mental disorder with regard to involuntary treatment and placement.

    The elaboration of such instruments will require the establishment of ad hoc groups with a limited number of members with the necessary specific expertise (see details below).

    - Re-examination of the Additional Protocol concerning Transplantation of Organs and Tissues of Human Origin;
    - Re-examination of Rec(2006)4 on Research on Biological Materials of Human Origin – Symposium organised to provide a basis for re-examination;
    - Contribution to the elaboration of a possible legal instrument against organ trafficking;
    - Assessment of ethical and legal challenges raised by developments in neurosciences such as brain imaging (expert study);
    - Assessment of legal and practical situation in member states on access to medical file (elaboration of a questionnaire, analysis of its replies from member states);
    - Promotion of educational tool for the initiation of debate with young people on bioethical issues;
    - Awareness-raising and facilitation of implementation of principles laid down in the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine in member states (4 seminars on ethics of biomedical research);
    - Study on legal and organisational aspects of biomedical research ethics review in Russia / Ukraine.

Composition

47 member states representatives of the highest possible rank, with expertise in bioethics and with the following qualifications: biologists, medical practitioners, researchers and other scientists, specialists on ethics, lawyers, any other persons qualified in biomedical questions and able to consider them from a human rights viewpoint;
Representatives of other International Organisations: European Commission, European Science Foundation (ESF), WHO, UNESCO and OECD;
Representatives of other CoE committees, in particular in the field of data protection, transplantation of organs and tissues and blood transfusion;
Other: States with observer status with the Council of Europe (Canada, Holy See, Japan, Mexico and United States of America), as well as Australia and Israel;
Church and Society Commission of the Conference of European Churches (KEK).

The Gender Equality Commission

Activities

The Secretary General proposes to launch a new transversal programme on gender equality. The proposals aim to ensure mainstreaming of gender equality, co-ordination of action and strategic planning. The elements of this new set-up will include:

    - The Committee of Ministers Thematic Co-ordinator on Equality and Trafficking;
    - A network of multiple national contact points;
    - An intersecretariat task force;
    - An advisory body (the new CoE gender equality commission);
    - A co-ordination unit in the Secretariat bringing together responsibility for gender equality both within the Secretariat and in Council of Europe operational programmes.

Relevant bodies of the Parliamentary Assembly, the Congress and of the civil society structure will be actively involved in the transversal programme.

The transversal programme will aim at achieving de jure and de facto gender equality and support implementation of the Committee of Ministers Madrid Declaration (May 2009) and the Action Plan of the Baku Ministerial Conference (May 2010). It will also aim at promoting ratification and implementation of the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence. Special efforts will be placed in reinforcing the visibility and impact of results through a user-friendly website and materials.

The CoE Gender Equality Commission shall, in particular:

    a) Conduct needs’ assessments and advise on the development of standards, co-operation and monitoring activities within its field of competence in accordance with criteria adopted by the Committee of Ministers;
    b) Provide expertise on the development of legislation, policies, practices, training schemes and awareness material to support implementation of standards at national level;

    c) Support a network of multiple national contact points from government, parliaments, local authorities, civil society and business for the purposes of achieving real change on gender equality in member states (i.e. by developing intersectorial co-operation at national level; acting as a contact point with CoE in order to facilitate assistance activities);
    d) Organise an annual thematic conference of national contact points to exchange experience, good practices and facilitate progress;
    e) Advise the Committee of Ministers and the Secretary General on appropriate actions to be taken and likewise provide advice as requested on such questions as may arise;
    f) Provide a forum for co-ordination and joint planning at international level with the European Union, UN Women and other intergovernmental organisations and civil society.

Particular attention will be given to evaluating implementation of the following legal instruments – the results of which would provide a basis for possible co-operation activities:

    a) The Council of Europe convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence;
    b) Rec(2003)3 on balanced participation of women and men in political and public decision-making;
    c) Rec(2008)1 on the inclusion of gender differences in health policy;
    d) Rec(2007)17 on gender equality standards and mechanisms;
    e) Rec(2007)13 on gender mainstreaming in education.

Composition

Gender Equality Commission

    - 11 independent experts nominated by the CM on proposal by member states;
    - EU, UN Women, other UN bodies, ODHIR-OSCE ;
    - Representatives of civil society upon invitation of the Committee of Ministers;

Ad hoc expert group (access of women to justice)

    - 7 governmental experts;
    - EU, UN Women, other UN bodies, ODHIR-OSCE;
    - Representatives of civil society upon invitation of the Committee of Ministers;

Working methods
The Commission shall meet twice a year. As a rule, the members of the Commission will be consulted regularly by e-mail, tele-conference and videoconference.

If necessary, the Committee of Ministers may be invited to create ad hoc expert groups of governmental experts with a clear and time-bound mandate. Such expert groups would involve in their work the relevant existing steering committees that will be asked to validate the results before transmitting to the Committee of Ministers (i.e. standard-setting activities will be validated by the Steering Committee on Human Rights (CDDH).
Training (internal and external) will be a key working method with a view to providing an effective capacity within both the Secretariat and national administrations to mainstream gender equality and put in place gender equality programmes.
Governmental experts from the 47 member states will be kept involved in the Council of Europe work through a virtual platform, the annual thematic conference and regular updates by the Secretariat, in particular, via newsletters and the provision of expertise as requested.

Pillar II: Rule of Law

Steering Committee on Information Society (CDSI)
(Reporting line CM: GR-H)

Main mission

Intergovernmental and multi-stakeholder co-operation (support, development and oversight) to protect, promote and ensure human rights, rule of law and pluralist democracy in the field of Information Society:

    - contribute to defining a comprehensive, transversal CoE strategy;
    - prepare legal instruments (often with a global vocation);
    - monitor implementation (oversee action on CM Declaration of 13 January 2010).

Objective: to ensure rights and freedoms and maximise the enjoyment of benefits in the Information Society (including the Internet) while minimising restrictions and, at the same time, ensuring a level of security that users are entitled to expect.

Activities

Human rights

    - freedom of expression and the right to information (including Internet freedom);
    - Internet governance, sustainability and ongoing functioning of the Internet;
    - freedom and responsibilities of the media;
    - right to respect for private life and correspondence, including data protection.

Rule of law

    - users’ rights and protection (including e.g. child protection from abuse, privacy protection);
    - positive use of Internet and ICTs (e.g. to combat domestic violence);
    - forum, jurisdiction and conflict of laws (consequences on freedom of expression).

Good governance

    - governance of, and in, the Information Society (and international bottom-up Internet policy developments, e.g. global and regional Internet regulatory authorities e.g. ICANN, regional registries);
    - e-democracy, e-participation, e-government;
    - media and Internet literacy and participation (and related aspects of education, youth, intercultural and inter-religious dialogue);
    - enabling tools for the achievement of the UN Millennium Development Goals.

Composition

Number of member states: 47 for the plenary Committee (two 4-day meetings / year) (with a 7 member Bureau – two 2-day meetings / year);
Representatives of other International Organisations: EU, OSCE. OECD, UN agencies;
Other: Non-member states (USA, Canada, Japan, Brazil, India…), civil society and representatives of business, technical and academic communities.

Subordinate structures
A number (to be determined) of subordinate ad hoc advisory groups and of working groups to assist the steering committee.

Pillar III: Democracy

Steering Committee for Education Policy and Practice (CDPPE)
(Reporting line CM: GR-C)

Main mission

The CDPPE will oversee and advice the Committee of Ministers on all aspects of the Council of Europe’s Education programme. The overall aim will be to develop a coherent vision of the role of education, from pre-primary and primary through higher education, within a lifelong learning perspective, with particular emphasis on preserving and promoting human rights, democracy and rule of law, and the ability of our societies to engage in intercultural dialogue.

Activities

The CDPPE will be responsible for supervising the education projects within the following programmes in the 2012 – 2013 programme budget:

Programme 1: Democratic governance through education[, culture and youth policies]

Programme 2: Human rights, democratic citizenship and participation through education[, culture and youth policies]

Programme 3: Culture and democracy: protecting and promoting cultural diversity, intercultural dialogue and competences

Programme 4: Addressing post-conflict situations through education[, culture and youth policies].

Composition

Number of member states: 50 (1 representative of each of the 50 States Party to the European Cultural Convention); observer States.

Representatives of other relevant International Organisations (European Commission, Arab League for Education Culture and Science Organisation (ALECSO), Nordic Council of Ministers, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO)).

Other: the European Wergeland Centre as well as international non-governmental organisations with observer status with at least one of the current Steering Committees: Education International (EI), European Association of Institutions in Higher Education (EURASHE), European Federation of Catholic Universities (FUCE), European Science Foundation (ESF), European Students’ Union (ESU), European University Association (EUA), International Association of Universities (IAU); European Council of Doctoral Candidates and Junior Researchers (EURODOC) (request recommended by the CDESR plenary 2011).

Subordinate structures

The Council of Europe Education Forum, meeting every two years, and bringing together public authorities, representatives of the academic community, NGOs with major activities in European education policy and other major stakeholders, will advise the CDPPE on major issues of education policy.

An aspect of co-management will be introduced through the Joint Council on Education, which will meet twice a year. It will be appointed by the CDPPE and composed of the Chair, Vice-Chair and two further members of the CDPPE, two representatives of the academic community and two representatives of the NGOs with observer status in the CDPPE. Experts engaged in the implementation of specific expected results may be invited to the deliberations.

The CDPPE will have recourse to working groups and/or external consultants for the implementation of expected results.

Steering Committee on Cultural Diversity and Intercultural Dialogue (CDDI)
(Reporting line CM: GR-C)

Main mission

The CDDI will oversee and advise the Committee of Ministers on all aspects of the Council of Europe’s Culture Programme. The Steering Committee’s fundamental objective will be to develop and promote the Council of Europe’s cultural contribution to the mutual recognition and management of cultural diversity, the strengthening of the social fabric, and the processes of participation in a pluralist Europe, in a human rights and democracy driven perspective. The Committee’s focus will also be on the cultural and cultural and natural heritage components of diversity, fundamental for everyone’s quality of life and identity.

The CDDI will promote intercultural dialogue as a process and a key challenge to secure social cohesion and trust, and to avoid conflict.

The newly integrated mandate builds on two previous Steering Committees (CDCULT and CDPATEP) targeting different policy making levels (national, regional, local) and using appropriate Council of Europe instruments - Conventions, policies and strategies, information systems, capacity building and field activities, communication and public awareness.

Activities

The CDDI will be responsible for supervising the expected results that are part of the following programmes in the 2012 – 2013 Programme of activities:

    - Democratic governance through education, culture and youth policies;
    - Addressing crisis situations: post-conflict and natural catastrophes;
    - Culture and democracy: cultural diversity and intercultural dialogue;
    - Democratic citizenship through education, culture and youth policies.

The CDDI will focus on:

- Devising innovative policies and strategies for democratic governance of culture and the management of diversity, using intercultural dialogue as an instrument of mediation, reconciliation and inclusion, and preparing standards and guidelines for intercultural dialogue that recognises the rights of minorities and vulnerable groups; promoting policies to protect equal rights of all citizens in the sectors of culture and cultural and natural heritage and landscape.

- Follow-up of Conventions: European Cultural Convention; European Convention on the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage; Convention for the Protection of the Architectural Heritage of Europe; European Landscape Convention; Council of Europe Framework Convention on the Value of Cultural Heritage for Society; European Convention on Cinematographic Co-Production; European Convention for the Protection of Audio-Visual Heritage and development of new standards as required, building on the conventions’ added value for society.

- Providing information systems on cultural policy and cultural heritage and landscape in CoE member states (Compendium, HEREIN, Culture Watch Europe).

    - Pilot projects, technical assistance and field activities in promoting confidence, reconciliation, sustainable integration, cohesion and socio-economic development. Action will include inter alia Intercultural Cities Project; Regional Programme for Cultural and Natural Heritage in South-East Europe; Kyiv Initiative Regional Programme, EU/CoE Support to the Promotion of Cultural Diversity in Kosovo15.

    - Follow up to additional proposals that arise from the European Group of Eminent Persons relating to the sector of culture and cultural and natural heritage.

Composition

Number of member states: 50 signatories to the European Cultural Convention with one representative per signatory state;
European Union;
Participants, other participants16 , observers as for the previous two committees (combined);
Possibly addition of more representatives from relevant civil society bodies to Committees.

European Committee for Social Cohesion (CDCS)
(Reporting line CM: GR-SOC)

Main mission:
- promote and facilitate the implementation of the New Strategy for Social Cohesion and the related Council of Europe Action Plan for Social Cohesion as approved by the Committee of Ministers;
- mainstream social cohesion and ensure co-ordination and communication between relevant Council of Europe bodies in order to achieve significant results;
- co-ordinate, guide and stimulate co-operation between the member states with a view to promoting the standards embodied in the European Social Charter, the revised European Social Charter, and other Council of Europe instruments relevant for social cohesion;
- promote and facilitate the implementation of the European Charter of Shared Social Responsibility17 as a tool to involve all concerned stakeholders in maintaining and developing social cohesion;
- contribute to strengthening social cohesion by promoting intercultural competences in social services as stated in the corresponding Recommendation18;
- contribute to fighting poverty and ensuring the protection of human dignity in the context of the 21st century;
- oversee the promotion, implementation and follow-up of the “Council of Europe Action Plan to promote the rights and full participation of people with disabilities in society: improving the quality of life of people with disabilities in Europe 2006-2015” [Recommendation Rec(2006)5];
- contribute to the strengthening of social cohesion by promoting equitable access to health care taking into account the social determinants of health and by improving participation of citizens and patients in the governance of health systems;
- maintain regular exchanges of views, information and good practice on issues relating to social cohesion with Council of Europe member states, as well as with relevant international organisations both governmental and non-governmental. 

Composition:

All 47 Council of Europe member states;
Other relevant steering committees, due to the transversal nature of social cohesion, will be invited but can be listed only after a final decision is taken on their restructuring;
Parliamentary Assembly, Congress and Conference of INGOs;
Partial Agreement Co-operation Group to Combat Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking in Drugs (Pompidou Group) and the Council of Europe Development Bank (CEB);
European Commission;
States with observer status (Canada, Holy See, Japan, Mexico, United States of America);
European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC) and Confederations of European Business (EUROBUSINESS) (“social partners”);
European Disability Forum;
European Association of Service Providers for Persons with Disabilities (EASPD);
International Union for Health Promotion and Education;
European Patient Forum.

Subordinate structure

In the work field on the Council of Europe Action Plan to promote the rights and full participation of people with disabilities in society: improving the quality of life of people with disabilities in Europe 2006-2015 [Recommendation Rec(2006)5] for the duration of the Plan.

Composition: Open-ended structure of 24 member states on a rotation principle. ‘Participants’, ‘Other Participants’ and ‘Observers’ are in conformity with CM Resolution, Res(2005)47, chapter III.

APPENDIX IV

Explanatory note.

APPENDIX V

Indication of the composition and of the number of meetings of the news steering committees and subordinate bodies.



Addendum to SG/Inf(2011)9 Final

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1 Upon adoption of the reform of intergovernmental structures this Resolution will be revised accordingly.

2 The terms of reference of all the currently existing subordinate structures will come to an end on 31 December 2011.

3 This Committee is not subject to Resolution (2005)47.

4 Terms of Reference of the CS-SS.

5 Includes participation expenses (travel and per diems); interpretation; production of documents.

6 Includes participation expenses (travel and per diems); interpretation; production of documents. Does not include cost of working methods and groups to be established to support new structures.

7 Doc CM (2011) 48 rev.

8 For gender equality, to the extent of standard-setting activities and the preparation of draft CM replies to PACE recommendations.

9 Adopted respectively by the High Level Conferences on the Future of the European Convention on Human Rights at Interlaken (Switzerland) on 19 February 2010 and Izmir (Turkey) on 27 April 2011.

10 Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)/Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR), Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA).

11 Committee of Legal Advisers on Public International Law (CAHDI); Steering Committee on Legal Affairs (CDAJ).

12 Parliamentary Assembly, Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe, Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights, Registry of the European Court of Human Rights, European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI), Conference of INGOs of the Council of Europe, European Commission, Council of the European Union.

13 Canada, Holy See, Japan, Mexico, United States of America, Belarus.

14 Adopted respectively by the High Level Conferences on the Future of the European Convention on Human Rights at Interlaken (Switzerland) on 19 February 2010 and Izmir (Turkey) on 27 April 2011.

15 All references to Kosovo, whether the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nation’s Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo.

16 In accordance with terms of CM Resolution (2005) 47.

17 The Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers to member states which includes the Charter should be adopted by the CM in the second half of 2011.

18 The Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers to member states on “Intercultural competences in social services” will be adopted by the CM on the second half of 2011.



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