Ministers' Deputies / Working Parties

GT-CNS
Ad hoc Working Party of the Committee of Ministers
on the Future of the European Centre for Global
Interdependence and Solidarity (North-South Centre)

GT-CNS(2013)4 final 14 May 20131



The future of the North-South Centre

Report of the GT-CNS



1. In compliance with the mandate given by the Committee of Ministers, the Ad hoc Working Party on the Future of the European Centre for Global Interdependence and Solidarity (North-South Centre) (GT-CNS) has held four meetings during which it has reflected on proposals for the future of the North-South Centre and has considered the question of the required number of participants of the Enlarged Partial Agreement. The reflections and subsequent proposals are submitted to the Committee of Ministers.

I. Introduction

2. The North-South Centre was created more than twenty years ago with the purpose of raising awareness of global interdependence. A synoptic file concerning the Centre is set out in the Appendix.

3. The Centre’s long experience in the field of co-operation between the Council of Europe and the countries of the South, particularly the southern Mediterranean, have enabled it to develop a specific know-how, build up major networks and become a reference point for a whole range of interlocutors, including both civil society and institutional representatives.

4. For over two decades, the Centre has been promoting dialogue between North and South, fostering solidarity and raising awareness on interdependence, and developing regional activities geared to transmitting and promoting the values which are central to the Council of Europe’s mission. Its work has therefore provided genuine added value.

5. Its operating structure, known as “quadrilogue”, which ensures co-ordination between the member States of the Agreement, parliamentary and local authority representatives, as well as representatives of non-governmental organisations, has proven a valuable asset. Furthermore, the Centre has provided a good co-operation platform between the Council of Europe and the European Union, which participates in the financing of the Centre’s activities.

6. Today, the international scenario has changed: “globalisation has compressed space and time”2 and the new challenge is living together while respecting our diversity. The world has become more complex and, besides economic co-operation, intercultural dialogue3 has emerged as an immediate, urgent need. Thus, paragraph 6 of the 2005 Warsaw Declaration already contains a call for intercultural dialogue.

7. Therefore, we cannot escape the fact that after two decades, the Centre is bearing the brunt of the effects of multiple crises – some of which stem from factors inherent in the Centre itself and others from difficulties experienced by most European countries and from the major geopolitical changes which have forcibly changed the Council of Europe’s framework for multilateral co-operation.

8. These crises have had two main effects on the Centre:

a) the withdrawal of several countries which have considered that the Centre did not respond to their expectations any more, significantly reduced the number of its members which, in 2013, dropped below the minimum level for an Enlarged Partial Agreement, and which has led to a sharp fall in its financial resources;

b) a desire clearly expressed by both the current and potential future member countries to redefine and refocus the Centre’s place and mission in accordance with the present situation in the Council of Europe. Furthermore, the evaluation report requested by the Executive Committee, while welcoming the Centre’s value and acquis, pinpointed a number of dysfunctions and weaknesses which must be addressed under a major refocusing drive.

9. The GT-CNS was set up to deal with this matter. The Group devoted its meetings to discussing the Centre’s potential and future perspectives in the context of a renewed mission taking account of the major changes in the Council of Europe in terms of co-operation with countries in its immediate neighbourhood, and of the fact that many Council of Europe sectors are – as part of their institutional competences – already involved in these new fields of co-operation.

10. This work aimed not so much at changing the status and Statute of the Centre as to induce it to act in better synergy with the Council of Europe. This means listening to the member States funding the partial agreement and the representatives of the quadrilogue before assigning it a clear and above all a concerted mission in the implementation of the Council of Europe policy towards its immediate neighbourhood, while respecting its natural place in the field of co-operation with neighbouring regions. Once its objectives and activities have been refocused, the Centre should be ready to efficiently contribute to co-operation priorities with countries of the immediate neighbourhood, proposing concrete, measurable activities complementing any actions being conducted on the same subject by other sectors of the Organisation.

11. Following the above reflections, the GT-CNS has agreed on several key points consonant with the place of a “revisited” North-South Centre within the Council of Europe and on the orientation of its potential mission in the context of the neighbourhood policy and makes the proposals that follow in respect of the Centre and its mission.

II. Proposals

12. First, it has been underlined that the initial advantage that the Centre is already there, as an asset at the disposal of the organisation, should be fully taken into consideration. This implies that its possible refocusing can build on its present infrastructure and human resources in Lisbon, with its premises offered by the Portuguese government, and take advantage of the recognition and feeling of genuine ownership it enjoys amongst its partners in neighbouring regions and at international level. It may be reminded of the success each year of the Lisbon Forum. On the contrary, its possible closure would mean a serious disinvestment. However, it is clear that in present austerity circumstances, the Centre should strictly adjust its activities to available means and achieve synergy wherever possible.

13. Geographical focus - A second fundamental consideration is that the Centre has a valuable experience in working with neighbourhood regions. Thanks to its quadripartite configuration and established networks, the Centre is able to reach civil society. That experience should be put to good use. Thus, the Centre should focus its activities on the geographical areas that the Council of Europe policy towards the neighbouring regions would plan to cover. To strengthen its visibility and to avoid any misunderstanding, the Centre could simply be designated as “Lisbon Centre” or “Council of Europe Lisbon Centre”.

14. Thematic focus - The promotion of intercultural dialogue as a tool for disseminating democratic values and developing democratic culture has been identified as the field of action that the Centre should prioritise today. The recently modified Centre´s Statute of 2011 already includes intercultural dialogue in its mandate and the Centre has today a department devoted to it. It now is a matter of building it up in the sense of the White Paper, “allowing us to prevent ethnic, religious, linguistic and cultural divides and enabling us to move forward together, to deal with our different identities constructively and democratically on the basis of shared universal values”. This new focus would produce mutual benefits for neighbouring regions and Europe, because “if there is a European identity to be realised, it will be based on shared fundamental values, respect for common heritage and cultural diversity as well as respect for the equal dignity of every individual” (White Paper). Within this line of action, the Centre should continue to carry out activities for which it has recognised expertise and know-how, such as global and development education, in particular education for peace, through joint programmes with the European Union.

15. Target groups - In line with the proposals made by the Secretary General, the main conclusions of the 2012 Lisbon Forum and bearing in mind the high demand from neighbouring countries, the main target groups of the activities of the Centre within civil society would continue to be youth and women.

16. It has also been pointed out that, besides its role for disseminating Council of Europe standards and values, its in-depth, sustained dialogue with partners from neighbouring countries should allow the Centre to provide an exchange of information on the evolution of opinions and reciprocal perceptions. The Centre should be in a position to create a momentum for dialogue and rapprochement between the Council of Europe and its neighbouring countries, which could result in closer co-operation whilst providing the Council’s experience with regard to democratic transition and the role of civil society.

17. An important operational proposal is also that the Centre should ensure a stronger link with Strasbourg so that its visibility and impact are reflected in the Council of Europe headquarters. The specific suggestion is that the Chair of the Executive Committee and the Executive Director of the Centre hold regular exchanges of views with the Committee of Ministers. On the other hand, the Centre could also contribute to enhancing the visibility of Council of Europe activities and instruments, in particular by putting into place a communication programme for the general public using inexpensive resources such as the Internet and social networks.

18. The above proposals would imply that the Centre should be a Council of Europe relevant instrument that should be better used in its aim to contribute to the consolidation of the processes of democratisation in areas to be covered in its neighbouring policy. The Centre would serve as an interface between the Council of Europe and the neighbouring countries, previous to or complementary to their bilateral action plans or programmes within the framework of the policy towards the neighbouring regions.

19. As a result, the Centre would operate in line with the following principles:

Its profile

• The Centre is a full player in the Council of Europe’s policy towards its neighbouring regions.

• Thanks to its peculiar and unique position based on the quadrilogue, the Centre offers a strong platform for articulated dialogue and structured co-operation at the level of governments, parliaments, local and regional authorities and civil society.

• The platform provided by the Centre is an open space accessible to all countries in the neighbourhood and beyond.

• The Executive Committee, in accordance with the Centre’s Statute, is the decision making body of the North-South Centre.

Its role

• Contributing to the Council of Europe’s policy towards its immediate neighbourhood in ensuring dialogue and articulation between various parties of the quadrilogue.

• Promoting in this way the good governance, the democratic values, the principles, norms and standards of the Council of Europe and facilitating the process of political and democratic reform, especially in the countries in transition.

Its tools

• Its expertise in training and raising awareness on intercultural dialogue and Global Education

• Integrated, multilateral action with regional scope

• Its networks and longstanding partnerships

Beneficiaries

• Civil society, particularly youth and women,

• The four components of the quadrilogue as players and beneficiaries of the Centre’s activities.

• Member and non-member States, the Council of Europe.

20. As for the minimum required number of member States in the Enlarged Partial Agreement, it was considered that the Centre should be given until the end of 2015 to test this new line of action in order to give to more member and non-member States the opportunity to join. The Committee of Ministers shall be kept regularly informed of developments in this respect and an Interim Report will be elaborated and submitted to it by mid-2014. Moreover, the operation of the Centre and the implementation of the Plan of Action included hereafter should be the subject of an independent evaluation under the aegis of the Directorate of Internal Oversight (DIO) of the Council of Europe to be submitted to the Committee of Ministers as soon as the activities in the Plan are completed, and in any event, no later than June 2015.

III. Plan of activities

21. At the request of the GT-CNS, the Executive Committee of the Centre submitted the following plan of activities4.

22. The GT-CNS considers that this plan is a good contribution for the refocusing exercise that is considered necessary and that the implementation of this plan will reinforce the visibility of the Centre in the Council of Europe policy towards its neighbouring regions.

* * *

NORTH-SOUTH CENTRE PLAN OF ACTIVITIES

23. The plan of activities below has been prepared bearing in mind the following elements:

• the Centre’s acquis, know-how and instruments;

• the Centre’s mission as broadly defined by the Committee of Ministers’ Working Party;

• the proposals put forward by the Secretary General, particularly in connection with the special attention to be devoted by the Centre to civil society in general and women and young people in particular;

• the criteria which the Ad hoc Working Party wished to take on board, namely the fact that the activities proposed should be concrete, with clearly identified goals;

• consideration of the activities of other sectors of the Organisation working in the same field, with an eye to preventing duplication and after having ascertained how the Centre’s action can provide complementary input and added value;

• bringing the proposed action or activity into line with the contents and purposes of the Council of Europe’s neighbourhood policy, particularly with the programmes jointly run with the European Union;

• possibilities of financing – the plan of activities takes account of current resources; it is likely to evolve.

24. The Centre’s activities will draw on the same model: one or two activities, depending on available resources, which will produce explicit results (action plan, timetable). They will be the subject of an analysis and an overall assessment accompanied by concrete proposals, either in the context of the Lisbon Forums – which could, as the case may be, take place in different capitals – or under a specific conference. The activities will be the subject of an independent evaluation under the aegis of the Directorate of Internal Oversight (DIO) of the Council of Europe, to be submitted to the Committee of Ministers as soon as the activities are completed.

25. In addition, it should be noted that the representatives of the quadrilogue will be associated in all activities of the Centre and that financing of all activities proposed hereafter is assured, either in the framework of the Ordinary Budget of the Centre, through external financial contributions such as the EU-CoE Programme for strengthening democratic reforms in the southern Neighbourhood, voluntary contributions or other external financing.

I. Youth

26. Although civil society – and especially young people – played a decisive role in the recent changes in the Southern Mediterranean, their involvement in the democratic transition processes has remained marginal. The resulting dissatisfaction, combined with problems of unemployment and social exclusion, can therefore only weaken the democratic dynamics in these countries.

27. With the benefit of the experience of the Council of Europe, which, in the course of its enlargement, has always drawn on civil society and young people in the new member countries, the North-South Centre could be a key forum for dialogue between stakeholders in governance and young people. The latter could thus enjoy the benefit of the Centre’s tools and competences in the field of education for global citizenship, human rights and intercultural dialogue.

28. The Centre is therefore proposing three activities which would help to improve interaction between civil society, intergovernmental organisations and young people.

I.1. Structured participation in the democratic reform process

29. Good governance depends on a balanced dialogue in which each of the four parties concerned fully shoulders its responsibilities and respects those of the others. Only a balanced relationship of competences can foster constructive exchanges. The Centre’s role will be to reiterate and demonstrate the effectiveness of this principle by organising exchanges of experience between youth organisations and at all levels of the quadrilogue.

30. Another activity might involve extending existing anti-poverty networks and the methodology developed through the SPIRAL5 model to local players and youth organisations in the Mediterranean.

Types of activities, venues, dates and participants

Duration

Cost (€)

Source

NGO meeting/exchanges

Mediterranean University on Youth and Global Citizenship (Hammamet, Tunisia,
1-8 July 2013)6

NGOs from countries of the South and Central/Eastern Europe

1 day

10,000

NSC

Follow-up and framing of an action plan

Mollina Global University on Youth and Development

Mollina, Spain, September 2013

NGOs from countries of the South + experts

1 day

10,000

NSC

Evaluation and prospects

Lisbon Forum (devoted to stocktaking of all co-operation activities carried out in 2013)

Lisbon, Portugal, December 2013

Quadrilogue representatives of Council of Europe member States and countries of the South

* included in the cost of the Lisbon Forum, financed by the “Programme South”

1/2 day

8,000*

Ext

Continuation in 2014 (if experiment conclusive)

     

Types of activities, venues, dates and participants

Duration

Cost (€)

Source

Exploratory meeting on the SPIRAL approach in the countries of the Mediterranean

Mediterranean University on Youth and Global Citizenship (Hammamet, Tunisia,
1-8 July 2013)

Quadrilogue representatives from the countries of the South (in particular Morocco and Tunisia)

1 j.

10,000

NSC

+

Ext

I.2 Training on global democratic citizenship and intercultural dialogue

31. As part of a joint EU-NSC programme, the Centre implements activities on global education. These concern the most recent members of the European Union and those which will be joining it in the near future.7 The Centre considers that a version of this programme adapted to the countries in the neighbourhood, especially Tunisia and Morocco, would be a practical contribution to training civil society, particularly young people.

Types of activities, venues, dates and participants

Duration

Cost (€)

Source

Verification of the feasibility of the project: exploratory contacts and meetings,
Tunis, Brussels, Rabat – 2013

8,000

NSC

Adaptation and translation into Arabic of the guidelines for education in democratic citizenship – 2013

3,000

Ext

I.3 Young people and the media

32. Young people are closely involved in the development of the media, and the role played by social networks in the spread of the popular movements of January 2011 is well known. Above and beyond the implementation of a legal and legislative environment designed to ensure independence of the media and freedom of expression, activities aimed at young people in this area therefore seem essential. They result from exchanges of the Centre and its Executive Director, in particular with the Directorate General of Human Rights and the Office of the Directorate General of Programmes of the Council of Europe8.

Types of activities, venues, dates and participants

Duration

Cost (€)

Source

Depending on the results, organisation of a seminar: launch of a training programme for young journalists and bloggers on intercultural dialogue and the role of the media in a democracy

Mediterranean University on Youth and Global Citizenship (Hammamet, Tunisia,
1-8 July 2013)

1 day

8,000

NSC

+

Ext

Evaluation and prospects

Lisbon Forum (devoted to stocktaking of all co-operation activities carried out in 2013)

Lisbon, Portugal, December 2013

Quadrilogue representatives of Council of Europe member States and countries of the South

* included in the global cost of the Lisbon Forum, financed by the «Programme South»

1/2 day

8,000*

Ext

Continuation in 2014 (if experiment conclusive)

     

II. Women

33. Together with that played by young people, the part played by women in the democratic development of societies is one of the central issues of our times. Although the North-South Centre’s tools have already proved their relevance in this regard, their effectiveness would be enhanced through a focus on activities aimed at reinforcing the role of women at all levels of governance.

34. In this connection, full use should be made of the “North-South Process” initiated by the Centre,9 while prioritising one of the themes suggested below.

II.1.a. Women’s access to politics

35. To increase women’s participation in political life, the Centre will base its action on dialogue among elected representatives, civil society and governments, including interaction with the Council of Europe’s two assemblies, the other relevant sectors (such as the Committee on Equality between Women and Men) and all the tools already created by the Council of Europe. In addition to exchanges of experience, there will be discussions focusing on the implementation of relevant Assembly and Congress recommendations.

Types of activities, venues, dates and participants

Duration

Cost (€)

Source

National workshop on the North-South process for the empowerment of women

Mediterranean University on Youth and Global Citizenship
(Hammamet, Tunisia, 1-8 July 2013)

Quadrilogue representatives particularly Tunisian women associations.

1 day

10,000

NSC

National workshop on the North-South process for the empowerment of women

(Tetouan, Morocco, July 2013)

Quadrilogue representatives particularly Moroccan women associations.

1 day

10,000

NSC

Types of activities, venues, dates and participants

Duration

Cost (€)

Source

International conference of the North-South process for the empowerment of women (evaluation of previous activities and definition of future actions)

(Rabat, Morocco, October-November 2013)

Quadrilogue representatives of Council of Europe member States and countries of the South, in particular national and local elected representatives

1 1/2 days

25,000

NSC

Evaluation and prospects

Lisbon Forum (devoted to stocktaking of all co-operation activities carried out in 2013)

Lisbon, Portugal, December 2013

Quadrilogue representatives of Council of Europe member States and countries of the South

* included in the global cost of the Lisbon Forum, financed by the «Programme South»

1/2 day

8,000*

Ext

II.1.b. Women and the media

36. Women’s image and political role are closely linked to the place given to these issues in the media. The Centre’s contribution as an interactive platform would make it possible to adopt an intercultural, integrated and regional approach to these issues. It would also constitute follow-up to the work already initiated at the first Forum for Democracy.

37. This alternative theme is currently the subject of consultations with the different sectors of the Council of Europe to ascertain its relevance.

II.2. Fighting violence against women – contribution to promotion of the Istanbul Convention

38. The Centre can contribute to the prevention of violence against women by relaying the Council of Europe’s instruments, principles and recommendations in this area, in coordination with the relevant operational departments. Its activities would lead more specifically to interactive exchanges at quadrilogue level and to the development of a regional platform open to countries in the neighbouring regions.

Types of activities, venues, dates and participants

Duration

Cost (€)

Source

North-South Centre’s contribution to promoting the principles of the Istanbul Convention

Mediterranean University on Youth and Global Citizenship (Hammamet, Tunisia,
1-8 July 2013)

1 day

10,000

NSC

+

Ext

II.3. Prevention of trafficking in human beings

39. The approach to this issue – which does not solely concern women – goes beyond existing regulatory frameworks. What is involved here is an economic, cultural and social problem. It must therefore be addressed in a comprehensive way, together with all relevant interlocutors.

40. In this connection, the North-South Centre can act as an interface between institutional and civil society representatives in the countries of the neighbourhood and their counterparts in the Council of Europe States.

41. The idea will be above all to create a climate of trust which will foster constructive dialogue at the four levels of governance. A regional approach might also prove productive in terms of encouraging essential cross-border co-operation.

42. Furthermore, intercultural dialogue and education for active citizenship are the tools whereby the Centre would promote the permeability of activities initiated by the other sectors of the Organisation.

43. The North-South Centre will carry out these activities in coordination with the relevant operational departments.

Types of activities, venues, dates and participants

Duration

Cost (€)

Source

Organisation of a regional event for the promotion of the Council of Europe’s work in this field 2013-2014

Ext

Appendix I

North South Centre – Synoptic file

Nature: Enlarged Partial Agreement Date of creation: November 1989

Number of members: 17 (Azerbaijan, Cape Verde, Cyprus, Greece, Holy See, Iceland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Montenegro, Morocco, Portugal, San Marino, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain)

On-going accessions: 2 (Albania, Andorra)

Structures: Executive Committee

• Chair: Deborah Bergamini (Italy)

• Vice-chair: Jean-Marie Heydt, Conference of INGOs

• Member States: Azerbaijan, Cape Verde, Cyprus, Greece, Holy See, Iceland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Montenegro, Morocco, Portugal, San Marino, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain

• European Union (Commission, European Parliament, Committee of regions)

• Council of Europe (Parliamentary Assembly, Congress, Conference of INGOs, Joint Council on Youth)

• FIDH, Concord

    Bureau of the Executive Committee

• Chair

• Vice-Chair

• Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, Morocco, Serbia,

• Council of Europe (Parliamentary Assembly, Congress, Conference of INGOs)

• European Union (European Commission, European Parliament, Committee of regions)

Secretariat: Executive Director (secondment)

1 grade A2/A3 post (Deputy Executive Director)

2 grade B5 posts

    1 grade B2 post

2 positions (1 B3, 1 B5)

2013 budget: 952 000 euros

    Staff: 329 600 euros

    Sundry administrative costs: 144 600 euros

      EU-funded programme(s): 300 000 euros (JMA) and 50 000 euros (Programme South – Lisbon Forum)

    Centre’s activities: 127 800 euros

Main fields of activity:

• Promoting dialogue and co-operation between the Council of Europe and non-member countries, in particular those in the neighbouring regions, with all groups of society and especially young people and women.

• Ensuring the dialogue and interactivity between the four stakeholders in governance (parliaments, governments, local /regional authorities and civil society) on which the functioning of the Centre is based.

• Helping to promote democratic values, the principles and values of the Council of Europe, and thereby facilitating the processes of transition and democratic reform.

• Developing its activities by means of Global Education and training and raising awareness on intercultural dialogue, and through an integrated regional approach.

Principal partners:

Council of Europe (Parliamentary Assembly, Congress, intergovernmental sector,

Conference of INGOs)

European Commission

Alliance of Civilizations

Anna Lindh Foundation

Arab League

Aga Khan Development Network

Global Education Network Europe (GENE)

African Diaspora Youth Network in Europe (ADYNE)

Spanish Youth Institute (INJUVE)

Euroclio (European Association of History Education)

Appendix II

Joint Management Agreement between the European Commission

and the North-South Centre of the Council of Europe

“Raising awareness of global interdependence and solidarity through global/development education and youth cooperation in Europe and beyond

The European Commission and the North-South Centre of the Council of Europe signed a Joint Management Agreement (JMA) on 27 September 2012, for a period of three years (2013-2015). The present agreement continues similar activities covering the period 2009-2012.

The overall aim of the JMA is to strengthen global/development education in the new EU Member States, as well as EU acceding and candidate countries, by promoting dialogue, networking strategies, capacity building and exchange of good education practices in the field of global/development education. The JMA also aims at strengthening the role of youth as a key player in global and interregional development and to facilitate the development of youth policies and structures for youth participation, particularly in Europe and Africa.

Activities developed within the JMA:

- Strengthening global education policies - follow up to the 2012 Congress in the EU Member States and European Conference 2015;

- Strengthening global education policies at the institutional level – Implementing the Council of Europe Recommendation on global interdependence and solidarity;

- Strengthening global education policies – kick off seminars in EU acceding and candidate countries;

- Strengthening Africa-Europe Youth Cooperation – the Africa-Europe Youth Platform;

- Training and capacity building – Global Education and Youth training course for trainers;

- Training and capacity building - On-line training-courses on human rights, intercultural dialogue and active citizenship;

- Training and capacity building- adapting and translation of the Global Education Guidelines;

- Training and capacity building – Africa Europe Training Course for Youth Organisations;

- Training and capacity building – African Diaspora Training Course;

- Training and capacity building - Seed funding for Africa-Europe youth cooperation;

- Awareness raising – On-line resource centre for Africa –Europe cooperation;

- Awareness raising – Global Education Week.

Expected results:

Policy development and advocacy:

- The strategic recommendations adopted at the European Congress on Global Education in September 2012 are disseminated and implemented by stakeholders;

- National strategies on Global Education/Development Education are elaborated or consolidated through NSC facilitation in the 12 recent EU Member States, Croatia and the EU candidate countries;

- Youth policies are developed and youth participation facilitated in line with the conclusions and Plan of Action for 2012-2015 adopted at the 2010 Africa-EU youth Summit and at the 2011 youth leaders meeting.

- Youth groups from the African Diaspora living in Europe are more visible and their participation in Euro-African cooperation is strengthened.

Training and capacity-building:

- Target groups/key stakeholders have up-to-date pedagogical tools on Global/ Development Education;

- Key stakeholders/educators/youth multipliers receive quality training on Global/ Development Education (both residential and on-line);

- Innovative projects in Euro/African Cooperation are implemented through the seed funding mechanism;

Raising public awareness/understanding and disseminating best practice:

- Best practices in the field of Global/Development Education are disseminated among CoE member States and beyond;

- Best practices and expertise in the field of Africa-Europe youth cooperation are disseminated.

The JMA is implemented by the North-South Centre of the Council of Europe through close collaboration with non-state actors and civil society platforms, such as Concord and the European Youth Forum and local implementing partners.

The total amount of the JMA is 1.137.210 € for the three years, of which the European Commission is providing 900.000 € (79%) and the North-South Centre 237.210 € (21%).

1 This document has been classified restricted until examination by the Committee of Ministers.

2 Council of Europe White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue (7 May 2008).

3 Council of Europe White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue (7 May 2008): “Intercultural dialogue is understood as an open and respectful exchange of views between individuals, groups with different ethnic, cultural, religious and linguistic backgrounds and heritage on the basis of mutual understanding and respect. It operates at all levels – within societies, between the societies of Europe and between Europe and the wider world.”

4 The activities contained in this plan are to be carried out with funding other than the resources of the joint EU/NSC programme (“Joint Management Agreement between the European Commission and the North-South Centre of the Council of Europe”). For the sake of completeness, information detailing activities to be carried out under the Joint Management Agreement is contained in Appendix II.

5 Societal Progress Indicators and Responsibility of All.

6 This University is an initiative jointly initiated by the Council of Europe (North-South Centre, Youth Department, EU-CoE Youth Partnership), the Tunisian National Youth Observatory, the League of Arab States and other partners. The North-South Centre sees to co-ordination. During the University, youth representatives, whether organised or not, take part in activities proposed by the different partners. The University’s general aim is to facilitate political dialogue at youth level and the co-operation processes, notably at inter-regional level, with active participation by quadrilogue representatives.

7 The activities include online courses on education in active citizenship, human rights and intercultural dialogue. They are supplemented by the Handbook on education for global citizenship and seminars in the countries concerned, with a view to ensuring dialogue between young people and the authorities.

8 On the occasion of a seminar on freedom of expression (Tunis, Tunisia, 2-3 April 2013) - A similar activity could be organised in Morocco.

9 Further to the exemplary conference on this subject held in the Chamber of Deputies of the Italian Parliament in October 2011, the “North-South Process for the empowerment of women” was launched, with activities supported by an online network, EURO-MED WOMEN NETWORK, which currently has more than 600 members. The annual conference is the culminating event of the Process every year. Its 2012 edition was held in Istanbul.



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