CM(98)185 Addendum II ... (650/1.4) ... Campaign on global interdependence and solidarity : 3rd meeting of the International Organising Committee

Committee of Ministers

Comité des Ministres

Strasbourg, 4 November 1998

Restricted

CM(98)185 Addendum 2

For consideration at the 650th meeting of the Ministers’ Deputies

(24-26 November 1998, A level, item 1.4)

CAMPAIGN ON GLOBAL INTERDEPENDENCE AND SOLIDARITY;

EUROPE AGAINST POVERTY AND SOCIAL EXCLUSION

 

International Organising Committee

3rd meeting

(Strasbourg, 21 September 1998)

 

DRAFT REPORT

0. OPENING REMARKS

Mr Hans de Jonge, Head of External Relations at the Council of Europe, opened the meeting and welcomed the members of the International Organising Committee (IOC) on behalf of the Secretary General of the Council of Europe. In his introduction, he stressed the importance of the Campaign in the general context of globalisation at the end of the 20th century. Increasing interdependence between all countries and all peoples was a challenge that necessitated stepping up international and European co-operation.

 

The Campaign tied in with this new world trend and with preparations for the 21st century.

The launch of the Campaign on the occasion of Council of Europe Day at the WORLD EXPO in Lisbon on 10 September 1998 had been a great success, because of the stimulating tenor of the messages and speeches delivered and the large number of people present at the ceremony. Speakers had included Mr George Papandreou, Chairman-in-Office of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of Greece, Mr Mario Soares, former President of Portugal and Chairman of the Committee of Wise Persons of the Council of Europe, Mrs Mariam Cissé Sidibé, Executive Secretary of the CILSS (Inter-State Committee against Drought in the Sahel), while UN Secretary General Kofi Annan had sent a message of support to the Campaign.

1. ELECTION OF THE CHAIR

Mr Hans de Jonge proposed that this third meeting of the IOC be chaired by Ambassador Kirkpatrick, Permanent Representative of Spain to the Council of Europe. The proposal met with the approval of the participants and Ambassador Kirkpatrick agreed to chair the meeting.

2. ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA

The Chair submitted the agenda to the meeting. It was adopted.

Ambassador Kirkpatrick thanked the Portuguese delegation for its participation and its particularly active support at the time of the launching of the Campaign. He also extended thanks to those countries and organisations which had already manifested their support for the Global Solidarity Campaign with practical action.

He asked Mr Mikko Lohikoski, Executive Secretary of the Campaign, to present his report on the first meeting of the IOC Steering Group in the absence of its chairman, Ambassador Soares Guerra, whose duties in Portugal had prevented him from attending.

3. REPORT ON THE FIRST MEETING OF THE STEERING GROUP ON 15 JULY 1998

Mr Mikko Lohikoski explained the membership of the Steering Group of the International Organising Committee of the Campaign, which had been agreed at the second meeting of the IOC on 9 June 1998.

Following a lengthy discussion on the Campaign objectives, the Steering Group had come to the conclusion that it was imperative to develop the Campaign concept further. The human rights and social cohesion dimensions should be brought out clearly.

The Group had emphasised the pan-European dimension of the Campaign. It was important that the countries of central and Eastern Europe be involved and all the members of the Group exhorted them to join in the Campaign activities.

The Steering Group had discussed the Campaign title, logo and slogan at length. The official title adopted by the Committee of Ministers, "Campaign on Global Interdependence and Solidarity: Europe against Poverty and Social Exclusion", had appeared too long and difficult to remember. The Group had also highlighted the negative, and therefore uninspiring tone of the wording "against poverty and social exclusion". It had therefore opted for a snappier title, more immediately accessible to the general public. The title had thus been changed to: "Europe in the World - the World in Europe, Council of Europe Campaign for Global Solidarity".

Concerning media coverage and advertising of the Campaign, it had been decided to take inspiration from the "All Different - All Equal" Campaign organised by the Council of Europe from 1994 to 1996. The media had an important role to play in the success of the Campaign.

The Steering Group had decided to hold the third meeting of the International Organising Committee during the Parliamentary Assembly's September part-session, in order to take stock of the launching ceremony and to enable a large number of participants to attend. It had also decided to hold its own second meeting as soon as possible after the IOC meeting.

The Steering Group had agreed that co-operation with the European Union and NGOs was essential, and urged the Campaign Secretariat to continue its efforts in that direction.

The National Organising Committees (NOC) occupied a central place in the organisation of the Campaign. They were the vital relay of the Campaign in the participating countries. It was their job to co-ordinate and organise activities in their countries and foster co-operation between the national and international institutions, as well as to encourage as many institutions and members of civil society as possible to take part in the Campaign. In this respect there would have to be close liaison between the NOCs and the Campaign Secretariat, in order to ensure proper co-ordination and follow-up of the various activities.

Mr Helmuth Hartmeyer, for the Austrian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, expressed doubts about the title of the Campaign. Initially three main lines of action had been singled out: Europe in the world, globalisation and poverty. These three terms did not appear as clearly in the title the Steering Group had adopted. He stressed the importance of referring to "poverty". He understood that a more positive approach had been preferred to give the title more immediate impact, but he wanted to make it clear that these terms and questions could be taken up and used as such by the National Organising Committees in their activities in connection with the Campaign.

Mr Mikko Lohikoski confirmed that the themes of globalisation and poverty were indeed central to the Campaign.

4. REPORT ON RECENT CAMPAIGN DEVELOPMENTS

4.1 Launching ceremony in Lisbon on 10 September

(report by Ambassador Guillermo Kirkpatrick)

Ambassador Kirkpatrick said that the launching of the Campaign had been a success. The participants welcomed this successful start, while remaining aware that much remained to be done.

4.2 Sahel workshop in Lisbon on 10 September

(report by Ms Barbara Brouwer, OECD Sahel Club)

Ms Barbara Brouwer reported on the Sahel workshop, which had been an opportunity for representatives of civil society in the Sahel region to convey a public message to the participants. She emphasised the force of this message, expressed in such simple, readily understandable terms. The workshop had reached the conclusion that neither growth without equity nor equity without growth could be considered as acceptable development models.

Mr Mikko Lohikoski had attended the Sahel conference, and had found the discussions particularly interesting and fruitful. He proposed organising such "bottom-up" experiences with representatives of civil society in the different countries participating in the Campaign, in so far as this would crystallise the objectives to be achieved and mobilise the forces concerned. He also stressed the importance of encouraging participation by representatives of civil society in the Sahel.

4.3 Preparatory meeting of the Forum of the Poor

(report by Ms Annelise Oeschger, ATD Fourth World Movement)

Ms Annelise Oeschger explained that the preparatory meeting of the Forum of the Poor, organised by the North-South Centre in Lisbon on 11 September 1998, had been the first event to be organised under the patronage of the Council of Europe Global Solidarity Campaign. The title of the Forum had been borrowed from the Forum of the Poor in Thailand. It had been attended by participants from India, Thailand, Burkina Faso and Germany. The Sahel Club, the Council of Europe and the North-South Centre had also been represented.

The initial purpose of the preparatory meeting had been to set up an international network on poverty, bringing together representatives of different continents, to discuss the regional aspects of globalisation. The participants had agreed to meet again in 1999.

It had emerged from the discussions that people working on poverty in different parts of the world had many things in common. They all stressed the importance of getting members of governments and states to participate, to avoid creating resistance and facilitate the implementation of projects. It had also emerged that links between the poor and people working to help them were not very strong. One of the main conclusions of the preparatory meeting had therefore been the need to build up solid, lasting networks of relations between people living in poverty and people working for the poor. Another was that it was essential to listen to the poor and to be ready to discard certain prejudices. The participants had emphasised the dignity of the poor. The idea was to simplify dialogue with the poor and to consult them on projects that concerned them. An example of consultation of the local population in Portugal had been cited: when a neighbourhood in the city centre had been renovated, instead of evicting the local residents, as developers often did when city centres were renovated, not only had the local people been allowed to remain in their renovated homes, but they had been consulted on the redevelopment scheme. This example revealed a new approach to human relations in urban development: put people first and adapt projects to their needs, not the reverse. The municipal authorities concerned had put people before projects.

Another message of the preparatory meeting was that it was necessary to listen to people living in poverty, to forget one's prejudices and get close to them. It was also important to restore the bonds between poor people and their environment, failing which there could be no development. The idea was to make weak people strong. Globalisation deprived the weak of many things. They should therefore be strengthened. Advantage could be taken, under the auspices of the United Nations, of the timely date of the UN's International Day for the Eradication of Poverty (17 October).

Mr Jean Fabre, Deputy Director of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), took this opportunity to point out the need to involve the NGOs more actively in this initiative. He proposed holding the second Forum on 17 October 1999, to coincide with the UN Day for the Eradication of Poverty. He also suggested following the lead of the United Nations Peoples’ Assembly held in Italy in October 1997, where each participant had been sponsored by a medium-sized Italian town. This method helped to limit the expense to international and non-governmental organisations while encouraging encounters at different levels.

The preparatory meeting had produced proposals for a number of projects, including the organisation of a Forum of the Poor in Europe, to emphasise the link between the poor people of Europe and the poor people of the world.

The Deputy Permanent Representative of Portugal to the Council of Europe, Mr João Paulo de Matos Sequeira, pointed out that the wording "Forum of the Poor" was not terribly felicitous, which raised the question of conferences where there was a great deal of talk but no follow-up. He stressed the need for operational follow-up to this type of initiative, to ensure that the real problems were addressed.

Mr Jos Lemmers, Executive Director of the North-South Centre, explained that the name had been borrowed from that of the Conference held in Thailand.

Mr Marc Feix, of the Commission Sociale de l'Episcopat Français, representing the Holy See, agreed with the Deputy Permanent Representative of Portugal about the name and the follow-up to the Forum of the Poor, and informed the participants that the Bishops would soon be holding a forum similar to the one held in Lisbon, on the theme of "Sharing Suffering". It was important to address poverty in Europe and poverty in the world in the context of this common theme of sharing suffering, even if the conditions of suffering were not the same for all.

5. CAMPAIGN STRUCTURES

5.1 Committee of Patrons

Mr Mikko Lohikoski said that this question had been discussed at the Steering Group's first meeting and that personalities from Europe and elsewhere had been contacted. He had thus been able to announce the participation of Mrs Mary Robinson, High Commissioner for Human Rights, Mr Mario Soares, Chairman of the Committee of Wise Persons of the Council of Europe, Mr Martti Ahtisaari, President of Finland, Ms Vera Duarte, member of the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights, and Mr Pierre Cardin. Mr Lohikoski announced that forming the Committee of Patrons would take some time, and that other personalities had been contacted.

He took this opportunity to call on all participants to continue their efforts to persuade personalities, especially from central and Eastern Europe, and the Permanent Delegations to the Council of Europe, to join the Campaign and become members of the Committee of Patrons. He also noted that the private sector was as yet under-represented in the Campaign.

Ambassador Kirkpatrick, in the Chair, proposed that a Spanish personality be invited to join the Committee of Patrons, pointing out that in 1988 King Juan Carlos had chaired the Committee of Patrons of the North-South Campaign.

5.2 Guidelines on the establishment of National Organising Committees

Mr Mikko Lohikoski said that priority should now be given to setting up National Organising Committees (NOCs), to relay the work of the IOC and the Campaign Secretariat in participating countries. The Secretariat had prepared some draft guidelines on setting up NOCs. As the Campaign had only recently been launched, setting up NOCs was still rather difficult, but the Portuguese Organising Committee had already been set up and was ready to start work.

Mr Jos Lemmers said that the Campaign could never be a real success without the impetus imparted by "national campaigns" and in particular the active contribution of civil society. NGOs and the private sector must participate fully in this process and be represented on the NOCs. NGO activities already planned for 1999 or currently on the drawing board could very well be integrated into the Campaign. In this respect, he stressed the importance of the

financial participation of the European Commission and the support of the platform of development NGOs that went with it.

Mr Jean Fabre called for more information and direction from the Campaign Secretariat, particularly concerning the setting up of NOCs. He was unsure of the aims and purpose of these committees and referred to the considerable ground work done by Mr Lemmers on the occasion of the North-South Campaign in 1988. He felt the need for more links and information between the various meetings of the IOC and the Steering Group. In initiatives like this it was important to mobilise as much energy as possible in order to carry the Campaign along. This was why he felt that although the national level was important for mobilising energy, exclusion issues also had to be addressed at international level, and that this could be done not only through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs but also through the Ministry responsible for the Budget.

The participants agreed that active participation by the Ministries of Foreign Affairs of the different member states was crucial. The Campaign could also be an opportunity to forge or strengthen ties between NGOs and governments.

Ms Annelise Oeschger suggested that the relevant ministries mentioned in the guidelines for setting up NOCs should also include the Ministries of Foreign Affairs, Finance and Trade. She also pointed out that the lack of co-operation and communication between ministries at the national level would hinder the momentum of the Campaign at that level.

Mr Guennady Sokolov, Deputy to the Permanent Representative of Russia, said that although several Russian ministerial departments and NGOs were willing to take part in the Campaign, the financial situation severely limited the possibilities of action at the national level.

Mr Helmuth Hartmeyer announced that his country had decided to contribute financially to the Campaign, and that the exact size of the contribution was currently under discussion. Some of the money would go to the Campaign Secretariat in Strasbourg and some would serve to remunerate a person in Austria to work in collaboration with the Secretariat. Austria had not yet set up its National Organising Committee, but would be doing so shortly.

Ambassador Rüegg, Permanent Representative of Switzerland, announced that the Swiss Ministry of Foreign Affairs would handle Campaign co-ordination at the national level, and that Switzerland was contributing CHF 300,000, to be divided into three parts between the National Campaign, the Swiss NOC and the Campaign Secretariat in Strasbourg.

Ambassador Tovornik, Permanent Representative of Slovenia, referred to his country's active participation in the North-South Campaign in 1988 and pointed out that Slovenia had been one of the first countries of central Europe to join the project. A person from the Ministry of Education of Slovenia would be seconded to the Campaign Secretariat for a six-month period as of November 1998.

Mrs Clodagh O'Brien, representing the European Commission, said that the Commission was ready to co-operate, but that there was a three-month wait for any financial support.

Mr Mikko Lohikoski concluded on this point by noting that much remained to be done in terms of setting up National Organising Committees. Experience had shown that once the NOCs had been set up, they were generally efficacious. Mr Lohikoski warmly thanked Austria, Slovenia and Switzerland for the contributions they had announced. The main problem facing the Campaign in general and the Secretariat in particular was indeed a financial one.

5.3 Organisation

Logo

At the previous meeting it had been decided to use the logo of the North-South Centre as the official logo of the Global Solidarity Campaign. This had been confirmed at the first meeting of the Steering Group. It was important that the Campaign logo and slogan be used systematically for every event or activity organised in connection with the Campaign.

Web site

Participants stressed the importance of setting up a Web site to publicise the Campaign and facilitate the dissemination of information on current activities and future projects. It would also serve as a discussion forum.

6. PROGRAMME OF ACTIVITIES

6.1 Report on the current activities of the Campaign Secretariat

(Mikko Lohikoski, Executive Secretary of the Campaign)

- The Youth Forum, in co-operation with the Campaign, would be organising the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty ceremony in Strasbourg, on 17 October 1998, with messages from young people;

- Activities would also be organised in connection with the same date (17 October) in Paris, during the 20-kilometre foot race, and in Marseilles and Alicante;

- A conference on migration issues, under the aegis of the Sub-committee on Migration of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, was to take place in 1999 and could be included in the Campaign.

Four activities were planned in the specific framework of the Council of Europe

- An intergovernmental round table on "New challenges for youth policy in the era of globalisation", in Ljubljana, Slovenia, on 15 and 16 November 1998;

- The annual meeting of the Lisbon Forum on 24 and 25 October 1998;

- The meeting on "Citizenship and human rights in the Mediterranean", in Madrid, from 27 to 29 November 1998;

- A workshop on the European cultural heritage, in Stockholm, Sweden, to which representatives of the National Organising Committees already functioning by then might be invited.

Reports on other initiatives

- Mr Helmuth Hartmeyer announced that two major events in connection with the Campaign would take place during Austria's presidency of the European Union: one in the context of negotiations on the new Lomé Convention between the European Union and the ACP countries (Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific), on 12 and 13 November 1998, and the other during the Conference on the enlargement of the European Union and the battle against poverty in Europe, from 18 to 20 November 1998. Both events would receive financial support from the Austrian Government.

- Mr José Maria Ballester, Head of the Cultural Heritage Division of the Directorate of Education, Culture and Sport of the Council of Europe, explained that a line of action in the building sector was in preparation. The Council of Europe had launched a debate on social cohesion and housing policy in historic city centres. He suggested that a debate on social housing in historical city centres be organised, drawing inspiration from the Lisbon City authorities, which had renovated the old part of the city in partnership with the local inhabitants, out of concern to preserve social cohesion and permeability in city centres. It was a shining example for others to follow.

- The Consul General of Japan, Mr Kunio Shimizu, announced that two events were in preparation in Japan this year that could be included in the scope of the Global Solidarity Campaign. At the beginning of October 1998 the annual International Co-operation Festival, promoting action in favour of the developing countries, would be taking place in Tokyo. A conference on African books was also being organised in Tokyo around mid-October, in partnership with a Swiss NGO (Fondation Développement et Education) and a Japanese NGO.

Mr Mikko Lohikoski announced plans to advertise the Campaign in the press and on television if this were possible financially. The IOC had received several positive replies from various media, such as MTV Europe, who had offered to broadcast advertisements free of charge to promote the Campaign. Media all over Europe had been contacted and had responded favourably to the idea of promoting the values and activities of the Campaign in their local areas. The German magazine "Burda" has also agreed to publicise the Campaign. Mr Lohikoski suggested that "pilot projects" could be developed in conjunction with the media in the future.

Mr Ritchie Cogan, Director of the One World Group of Broadcasters, announced his readiness to promote the Campaign among public-channel producers in Europe.

7. OTHER BUSINESS

Everybody agreed on the need for all information concerning the Campaign to be shared between the various partners. Mr Jos Lemmers said that the forthcoming opening of the Campaign web-site in co-operation with the North-South Centre in Lisbon would help to facilitate exchanges of information and develop the idea of a "forum" for exchanging ideas.

The Chair announced the public forum that was to be held that afternoon with experts on globalisation, social cohesion and development. Dr Roger Griffin, from Oxford Brookes University, Professor Uwe Holtz, from Germany, and Mrs Maryvnne Lyazid, from the Institute of European Studies in Strasbourg, would be taking the floor to share their experience and their views on the matter footnote 1 .

8. DATE AND PLACE OF FORTHCOMING MEETINGS

It was proposed that the IOC meet again very shortly in order to ensure proper co-ordination of the Campaign activities and keep information circulating. Participants would be informed of future meetings in due course.

 

*

* *

PUBLIC FORUM

ON THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE GLOBAL SOLIDARITY CAMPAIGN

Monday 21 September 1998

Council of Europe Headquarters

Strasbourg

 

Dr Roger Griffin, Professor in History at the University Oxford Brookes, UK

The Contemporary Struggle between Democracy and Ethnocracy in Europe : Role Models for the Re-thinking of Liberalism

Denial, Identity, Network, Globalisation, Utopianism, Enlightenment : adding the first letter of each of these terms spells out the French word " DINGUE ", meaning crazy. "DINGUE" is indeed a suitable acronym to describe both the aims and the actors of this new Campaign. One must be "dingue" to start off on such an idealistic mission of reducing poverty, encouraging public awareness to the widening gap between the North and the South and putting an end to the unsustainable growth of modern economies.

DENIAL is the attitude of all educated and informed people in the North who live in such a way that they know that they are destroying the planet, yet refuse to admit so. Denial is to shun away from the cataclysmic future which hard science assures us lies ahead of us if radical structural changes in economics, politics, and values do not take place within a maximum of two generations.

IDENTITY is a term, which we have abandoned to the far right and which has become one of its main obsessions. A major feature of the Campaign should be to assert a vision of identity which counteracts the far-right position by demonstrating that it is possible to tackle this issue in a positive way which enhances rather than threatens our multiple identities.

GLOBALISATION for the far right is synonymous with an identity-eroding "mondialisation". The Campaign should present a model of globalization which stresses the inevitability of the increasing interconnectedness, but also the chance for the universalization of human rights, social good practice and sustainable technology in every part of the world.

NETWORK is a buzzword of our contemporary society, where everything has become technically interconnected, but where science is also revealing the fantastic interconnectedness of all living systems. The global solidarity campaign will involve the modern technologies to convey a message of interconnectedness

UTOPIA is what any vision of global solidarity can easily be dismissed as. The ideas of ecological humanism outlined here are so at variance with the prevailing common sense of existing societies whether capitalist, fundamentalist, authoritarian, or communist, that they seem utopian. However, in strictly scientific ecological terms the prevailing paradigms or norms are unsustainable, and it is utopian to think that they are sustainable.

ENLIGHTENMENT has two meanings: it refers to the age of the `philosophes' who first articulated the principles which only became the official paradigm in the French Revolution and helped establish political liberalism as a norm of western capitalism. It also means more generally a state of wisdom, which transcends the conventional cleverness of the day. The role of the Campaign is thus not just to address present human problems but to help prepare for the sustainable system of structures and values which will be vital to humanity's survival, but which can only be constructed when objective events have demonstrated conclusively the inviability of the present world order.

The North has been advancing far too long on a path of unsustainable madness; this Campaign must offer an alternative to the careless behaviour of the North and provoke or facilitate the paradigm shift in the minds of the majority. We dramatically and urgently need to reconsider our economic, social and environmental policies and implement a sustainable development for the whole planet.

* * *

Uwe Holtz , former Chairman of the Committee on Economic Affairs and Development of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe and of the Committee on Economic Co-operation of the Bundestag

Changes since the North-South Campaign (1988) and Consequences for the Council of Europe Global Solidarity Campaign (unofficial translation)

The main evolution between the first campaign and the new one has certainly been the dramatic enlargement of the Council of Europe to central and eastern Europe, thus becoming the only pan-European institution including countries officially recognised as "developing" countries by the OECD. During this recent and short time span, the world has experienced the two contradictory trends of globalisation and fragmentation, which have increased the inequalities between the North and the South and have contributed to a further marginalisation of the poorer countries.

Also, new actors, such as non-governmental organisations, and means of communication have appeared on the international scene, multiplying the number of global players and their interconnectedness.

There are many possible plans of action to reduce the inequalities and offer an alternative to such an unsustainable evolution, yet there is an even greater lack of political will of the governments of the developed countries.

It is certainly important to consider the positive and the negative points of the 1988 campaign in the perspective of the new campaign in order to ameliorate the action of our future activities. The main positive aspects of the initial campaign were namely its principles, the pan-European framework, the strengthening of the NGO network within the participating countries and the common European demonstration of political will to overcome North-South problems. Nonetheless, certain negative aspects of the campaign need to be pointed out, such as the lack of time, the lack of links between the national and international committees, the insufficient participation of NGOs, the inadequate coverage of the campaign activities by the media, the little involvement of the political circles, and finally the lack of sufficient financial means.

All these elements obviously need to be taken into account so as to ensure a greater efficiency of the new Campaign. To attract public attention the new Campaign should not avoid a controversial debate about the question which globalisation should be promoted. First and foremost, the body politics, academics, the business sector and the media must imperatively be involved in every project and discussion throughout the Campaign.

Participants stress the fact that the Campaign must instill clear interconnectedness between international, national and local levels.

***

Maryvonne Lyazid, Strasbourg Institute of European Studies, Former Director of the Human Dignity and Social Exclusion Project of the Directorate of Social and Economic Affairs of the Council of Europe.

The experience of the Council of Europe's Action Plan on Human Dignity and Social Exclusion (unofficial translation)

Mrs Lyazid began by setting the Human Dignity and Social Exclusion Project in its context. The initial impetus had come from the NGOs and civil society. The Project had been based on partnership, with the Council of Europe orchestrating the whole and relying essentially on the activities and drive of NGOs, together with people who had actually experienced social exclusion. Management and labour in large firms and various foundations had taken part in the process. The basic idea was that human beings and their choices should be placed at the heart of social concerns.

An ad hoc body in the form of a group of patrons had been set up to secure the influence of personalities with sufficient political weight to put across the Project's message. Furthermore, a pan-European network of researchers had gradually been set in place with a view to producing monographs based on the study of the social situations encountered in the countries of Europe. Twelve monographs had thus been produced.

Half way through the Project, a colloquy on social cohesion had been organised in Bratislava, partly to take stock of the progress that had been made and partly to give the Project a new dimension, by placing the European continent in the global development context.

Ms Lyazid explained that the European Social Charter was the foundation stone for all thinking on globalisation at the social level. The European Committee for Social Cohesion had thus been set up, together with a specialised unit to spearhead it. In this way the Council of Europe was to become a veritable driving force behind the Project, especially in view of its reputation as the "home of values" in Europe - the values of democracy, the rule of law, human rights and social justice. Furthermore, the Project had derived considerable strength from the quadrilogue, whose pan-European dimension had ensured its success.

There was no denying, however, that some major drawbacks had existed and continued to exist: the low profile of the Council of Europe, and the correspondingly low-profile media coverage; a lack of human and financial resources, which caused problems when it came to following up operations within a reasonable time; a lack of co-ordination with other international organisations, and therefore a lack of co-ordination and junction with other projects in the same field. These were difficult pitfalls to overcome for an international organisation like the Council of Europe.

Ms Lyazid noted that this Project could be of considerable benefit to the Council of Europe's Campaign for Global Solidarity in so far as it appeared to go a stage further, both on the geographical level - all the Council of Europe's member states were supposed to be taking part in the Campaign - and in terms of the subjects covered: the traditional North-South divide was a thing of the past, and the Campaign was part of a vaster struggle for social justice. The Campaign would succeed only if it was underpinned by political determination.

***

Mr Mikko Lohikoski, Executive Secretary of the Campaign, concluded from these contributions and the ensuing discussions that it was essential that there should be an on-going exchange of views and ideas on the Campaign. It was the only way to build up momentum and boost the Campaign activities. Means should be found to increase the involvement of politicians in the Campaign, as well as academics and intellectuals, in order to set the ball rolling and keep the ideas flowing.

 

APPENDIX 1

Membership of the Steering Group

of the International Organising Committee

Of the Council of Europe Global Solidarity Campaign

-     Three Government representatives nominated by the Committee of Ministers, who are the Permanent Representatives of Slovenia, Portugal and Switzerland;

-     Two Parliamentarians (one to be nominated by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe and one to be nominated by the European Parliament;

-     Two NGO representatives (one to be nominated by the Liaison committee of Development NGOs of the European Union and one to be nominated by the Liaison Committee of NGOs enjoying consultative status with the Council of Europe);

-     Two representatives of the Local and Regional Authorities to be nominated by the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities in Europe;

- One representative of the European Commission;

-      One representative from the Intergovernmental Organisation UN family and one representing another intergovernmental international organisation.

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LIST OF PARTICIPANTS AT THE THIRD MEETING OF

THE INTERNATIONAL ORGANISING COMMITTEE OF

THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE GLOBAL SOLIDARITY CAMPAIGN :

" EUROPE IN THE WORLD - THE WORLD IN EUROPE "

21 September 1998

 

PAYS MEMBRES DU CONSEIL DE L’EUROPE/

MEMBER STATES OF THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE

Autriche / Austria

M. Heinz Gabler

Chargé des relations publiques de la coopération autrichienne au développement / In charge of public relations for austrian cooperation to development

Ministère fédéral des Affaires étrangères / Federal Ministry of Foreign Affairs

 

M. Helmuth Hartmeyer

Directeur de KOMMENT / Director of KOMMENT, représentant le ministère des Affaires étrangères de l'Autriche / representing the Federal Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Austria

 

Chypre / Cyprus

M.Charalambos Petinos

Adjoint au Représentant Permanent de Chypre auprès du Conseil de l'Europe / Deputy to the Permanent Representative of Cyprus to the Council of Europe

 

Lituanie / Lituania

Mme Audra Ciapiené

Adjoint au Représentant Permanent de la Lituanie auprcs du Conseil de l’Europe / Deputy to the Permanent Representative of Lituania to the Council of Europe

 

Luxembourg / Luxembourg

M. Gérard Philipps

Ambassadeur Extraordinaire et Plénipotentiaire, Représentant Permanent du Luxembourg auprès du Conseil de l'Europe

Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of Luxembourg to the Council of Europe

 

Portugal / Portugal

M. João Paulo Matos Sequeira

Adjoint au Représentant Permanent du Portugal auprès du Conseil de l’Europe/ Deputy to the Permanent Representative of Portugal to the Council of Europe

 

Mme Paula Silva

Adjoint au Représentant Permanent du Portugal auprès du Conseil de l’Europe/ Deputy to the Permanent Representative of Portugal to the Council of Europe

 

Roumanie / Romania

M. Cornel Alecse

Adjoint au Représentant Permanent de la Roumanie auprès du Conseil de l'Europe

Deputy to the Permanent Representative of Portugal to the Council of Europe

 

Fédération de Russie / Russian Federation

Mr. Guennady SOKOLOV

Adjoint au Représentant Permanent de la Fédération de Russie auprès du Conseil de l’Europe Assistant to the Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the Council of Europe

 

Slovénie / Slovenia

Mme Magdalena Tovornik

Ambassadeur Extraordinaire et Plénipotentiaire, Représentant Permanent de la Slovénie auprès du Conseil de l'Europe

Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of Slovenia to the Council of Europe

 

M. Mirko Vaupotic

Directeur adjoint, Ministcre de l'Education, Département de la Jeunesse /

Deputy Director, Ministry of Education, Youth Department

 

Espagne / Spain

M. Guillermo Kirkpatrick

Ambassadeur Extraordinaire et Plénipotentiaire, Représentant Permanent de l’Espagne auprès du Conseil de l'Europe

Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of Spain to the Council of Europe

 

Suisse / Switzerland

M. Alfred Rüegg,

Ambassadeur Extraordinaire et Plénipotentiaire, Représentant Permanent de la Suisse auprès du Conseil de l'Europe

Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of Switzerland to the Council of Europe

 

ETATS NON-MEMBRES - OBSERVATEURS / NON-MEMBER STATES - OBSERVERS

Saint-Siège/ Holy See

Mgr Michael A. Courtney

Envoyé Spécial, Saint-Siège

Special Envoy, Holy See

 

M. l’Abbé Marc Feix

Commission Sociale de l’Episcopat Français / Social Committee of the French Episcopate

Centre d’étude et d’action sociales / Centre of Social Studies and Action

Holtzheim, France

 

Japon/Japan

Mr Kunio Shimizu

Observateur Permanent du Japon auprès du Conseil de l’Europe

Permanent Observer of Japan to the Council of Europe

 

ASSEMBLEE PARLEMENTAIRE / PARLAIMENTARY ASSEMBLY

Markus Adelsbach

Co-Secrétaire de la Commission des migrations, des réfugiés et de la démographie / Co-Secretary of the Committee on Migration Refugees and Democracy

Greffe de l'Assemblée parlementaire / Greffe of the Parliamentary Assembly

 

CONGRES DES POUVOIRS LOCAUX ET REGIONAUX DE L'EUROPE CONGRESS OF LOCAL AND REGIONAL AUTHORITIES IN EUROPE

M. Georges Lycourgos

Membre du Groupe de travail "EUROMED" sur la coopération en matière de démocratie locale /

Member of the co-operation on local democracy working group "EUROMED"

Maire de Larnaca

Chypre

 

UNION EUROPEENNE/EUROPEAN UNION

Commission Européenne/European Commission

Mme Clodagh O'Brien

DG VIII - Développement

 

NATIONS UNIES/UNITED NATIONS

PNUD / UNDP

M. Jean Fabre

Directeur adjoint / Deputy Director

Genève, Suisse

 

UNESCO

Melle Cecilie Golden

Expert associé / Associate Expert

Division des Sciences Sociales, de la Recherche et de la Politique, Secteur des Sciences sociales et humaines / Division of Social Sciences, Research and Policy, sector of Social and Human Sciences

Paris

 

OCDE/OECD

Mme Barbara BROUWER

Administrateur/ Administrator

Club du Sahel/ Sahel Club

Paris

 

ONG AYANT LE STATUT CONSULTATIF AUPRES DU CONSEIL DE L'EUROPE

NGOs ENJOYING CONSULTATIVE STATUS WITH THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE

M. Jean Brunault

Représentant auprès du Conseil de l'Europe / Representative to the Council of Europe

Comité Européen pour l'Education des Enfants et Adolescents Précoces, Surdoués, Talentueux - EUROTALENT

European Committee for the Education of Children and Adolescents who are Intellectually Advanced, Higly Gifted, Talented - EUROTALENT

Tours

 

M. Claude-Laurent Genty

Secrétaire Général / Secretary General

Confédération Internationale des Travailleurs Intellectuels (CITI) / International Confederation of Professional and Intellectual Workers (CITI)

Paris

 

M. Paul Huot-Pleuroux

Président / President

Conférence Européenne des Radios Chrétiennes (CERC) / European Conference of Christians Radios (CERC)

 

M. Raymond Kromer

Représentant auprès du Conseil de l'Europe / Representative to the Council of Europe

Union Européenne des Anciens et Anciennes Elèves de l'Enseignement Catholique (UNAEC - Europe) / European Union of Former Students of Catholic Teaching (UNAEC - Europe)

 

M. Komlássy

Vice-Président / Vice-President

Union Fédéraliste des Communautés Ethiques Eruopéennes (UFCE) /

Federal Union Of European Nationalities (FUEN)

Suisse

 

M. Roger Lehmann

Représentant adjoint auprès du Conseil de l'Europe / Deputy Representative to the Council of Europe

Caritas Internationalis / Caritas Internationalis

Strasbourg

 

Me Marc Leyenberger

Représentant auprès du Conseil de l'Europe, Representative to the Council of Europe

Caritas Internationalis / Caritas Internationalis

Strasbourg

 

M. Karl-Heinrich Marquardt

Représentant auprès du Conseil de l'Europe, Representative to the Council of Europe

Eurolink Age

Londres

 

M. Enzo Merrigiola

Secrétaire Général Adjoint / Deputy Secretary General

Union Internationale des Magistrats (UIM) / Internatioanl Association of Judges (IAJ)

Pesaro, Italie

 

Mme Annelise Oeschger

Déléguée auprès du Conseil de l'Europe / Delegate to the Council of Europe, Mouvement International ATD Quart Monde

Freiburg, Allemagne

 

Mlle Marie-Thérèse Paillusson

Représentante auprès du Conseil de l'Europe, Representative to the Council of Europe

Fédération Internationale des Assistans de Service Social (FIAS) / International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW)

Paris

 

M. Jean-Pierre Ribaut

Représentant Permanent auprès du Conseil de l'Europe / Permanent Representative to the Council of Europe

Mouvement Catholique International pour la Paix - Pax Christi

Pax Christi - International Catholic Peace Movement

Pauillac, France

 

M. Justin Schlegel

Comité Européen pour l'Education des Enfants et Adolescents Précoces, Surdoués, Talentueux - EUROTALENT

/ European Committee for the Education of Children and Adolescents who are Intellectually Advanced, Higly Gifted, Talented - EUROTALENT

 

M. Bertrand Schoentgen

Chargé de mission au Secrétariat Général

Confédération Internationale des Travailleurs Intellectuels (CITI) / International Confederation of Professional and Intellectual Workers (CITI)

Paris

 

Mme Claudette Villanueva

Secrétaire Général, Confédération Internationale des Parents (CIP)

Secretary General, International Confederation of Parents (CIP)

Paris

 

Commission de liaison des ONG de Développement auprès de l'Union européenne- Liaison Committee of Development NGOs with the European Union

M Marc PROCHASSON

Development education officer

Brussels, Belgium

 

UNIVERSITAIRES / EXPERTS

Roger Griffin

Professeur / Professor

Oxford Brookes University

United Kingdom

 

Prof. Dr.Uwe Holtz

Représentant au Conseil de l'Europe / Representative to the Council of Europe

Société International pour le Développement (SID) /

Society for Itnernational Development (SID)

Bonn

 

Mme Maryvonne Lyazid

Institut des Etudes Européennes / Institute for European Studies

Strasbourg

 

MEDIAS / MEDIA

Ritchie Cogan

Directeur / Director

Groupe One World / One World Group

 

Hannu Vilpponen

Président, Chairman

Groupe One World / One World Group of Broadcasters

 

Anne-Cécile Robert

Journaliste / Journalist

Le Monde Diplomatique

Paris

 

CONSEIL DE L'EUROPE / COUNCIL OF EUROPE

Secrétariat / Secretariat

M. Hans de Jonge

Chef des Relations Extérieures/ Head of External Relations

Direction des Affaires Politiques/ Directorate of Political Affairs

 

Mikko Lohikoski

Secrétaire exécutif de la Campagne / Executive Secretary of the Campaign

 

M. Michael Remmert

Coordinateur du Projet Dignité Humaine et Exclusion Sociale / Human Dignity and Social Exclusion Project Co-ordinator

Direction des affaires sociales et économiques / Directorate of economic and social affairs

 

Mme Kathrin Merkle

Administrateur / Administrateur

Direction de l'Enseignement de la Cutlure et du Sport (DECS) / Directorate of Education, Culture and Sport (DECS)

 

Mme Mercedes Giovinnazzo

Division des Politiques et de l'Action culturelles

Direction de l'Enseignement de la Cutlure et du Sport (DECS) / Directorate of Education, Culture and Sport (DECS)

 

Isabelle Servoz-Gallucci,

Secrétariat de la Campagne / Secretariat of the Campaign

 

Centre Nord-Sud / North-South Centre

M. Jos Lemmers

Directeur Exécutif /Executive Director

Lisbonne

 

M. Giovanni Celiento

Directeur adjoint / Deputy Director

Lisbonne


1        The report of this public forum is appended.



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