Ministers’ Deputies

CM documents

CM(2009)62 add2 23 April 2009



1058 Meeting, 27 May 2009

7 Education and culture

7.1 Steering Committee for Education (CDED) and
Steering Committee for Higher Education and Research (CDESR) -
8th meeting (Strasbourg, 18-20 March 2009)

Draft education programme 2010-2014
“Education for intercultural understanding, human rights and democratic culture”



This document presents the new programme of activities of the Steering Committee for Education and the Steering Committee for Higher Education and Research for the years 2010-2014. Some of the project proposals are new and submitted for discussion in the CDED and CDESR for the first time. Others have been reformulated or renewed.

The programme covers all levels of education, from pre-school to higher education, with targeted activities focused in three areas: education for democratic citizenship and human rights, the teaching and learning of history and language teaching. Its overall aim is to develop a coherent vision of the role of education, with particular emphasis on preserving and promoting human rights, democracy and rule of law and the ability of our societies to engage in intercultural dialogue.

The programme has been developed throughout the year 2008 by the Bureaux of the CDED and CDESR assisted by the Secretariat. It has been discussed at three consecutive Bureau meetings (July, September and December). It has been approved by both committees and forwarded it to the Committee of Ministers for information in the context of 2010 budget and programme discussions.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

BACKGROUND AND CONTENT……………………………………………………… 3

A coherent education programme for 2010 – 2014 based on Council of Europe values 3

Education for a values-based society………………………………………………….. 3

A coherent education policy for diverse, complex societies…………………………. 3

EUROPEAN EDUCATION POLICIES FOR INTERCULTURAL UNDERSTANDING,
HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRATIC CULTURE…………………………………… 5

Values and competences………………………………………………………………… 5

Drawing on our past for our future………………………………………………………. 6

Democratic citizenship in a global age…………………………………………………. 6

EDUCATION: DECIDING THE FUTURE OF EUROPE……………………………… 7

Public responsibility in a context of diversity and globalisation……………………… 7

Governing diverse societies based on European values…………………………….. 8

EDUCATION IN THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE PROGRAMME…………………… 8

A variety of well adapted implementation mechanisms……………………………… 8

LINE OF ACTION: EDUCATION FOR INTERCULTURAL UNDERSTANDING,
HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRATIC CULTURE

PROGRAMME 1 : Promoting social inclusion and combating discrimination
in and through education……………………………………………………………… 10

      Project 1-A: Protecting and promoting the right to quality education in European
      education systems……………………………………………………………… 10

      Project 1-B: Language policies and the right to education and social inclusion 12

PROGRAMME 2 : Education for the promotion of the core values
of the Council of Europe………………………………………………………………. 16

      Project 2-A: Learning democracy and human rights in school and out-of-school throughout life…………………………………………………………………… 16

      Project 2-B: Learning the key principles and the functioning of the
      human rights system………………………………………………………….. 19

PROGRAMME 3 : Education for intercultural understanding
and sustainable democracies………………………………………………………… 22

      Project 3-A: Intercultural education and exchanges………………………… 22

      Project 3-B: Shared histories for a Europe without dividing lines…………. 24

      Projects 3-C: Day of Remembrance of the Holocaust
      and for the Prevention of crimes against humanity………………………… 26

PROGRAMME 4 : Higher Education for a Europe of values…………………… 28

      Project 4-A: Making the European Higher Education Area
      a reality beyond 2010………………………………………………………… 28

      Project 4-B: Higher education for a Europe of values: call on academic freedom, institutional autonomy and transparency…………………………………. 30

TRANSVERSAL PROJECTS

      Project T : Council of Europe programme for the training of education professionals (Pestalozzi Programme)…………………………………………………… 32

BACKGROUND AND CONTENT

A coherent education programme for 2010 – 2014 based on Council of Europe values

While several Council of Europe activities in the field of education are coming to an end in 2009, others will benefit from reformulation and renewal. This will be an opportunity to strengthen our programme and activities, bring them even further in line with the proposals made by the Standing Conference of European Ministers of Education and the priorities set by the European Ministers responsible for higher education in the framework of the European Higher Education Area. The draft programme also reflect the criteria set by the Committee of Ministers, based on the core objectives of the Declaration and the Action Plan of the Third Summit in 2005, and develops the kind of synergies called for in the Organisation’s Medium Term Strategy.

The overall aim of the Council of Europe’s education sector (2010-2014) will be to develop a coherent vision of the role of education, with particular emphasis on preserving and promoting human rights, democracy and rule of law and the ability of our societies to engage in intercultural dialogue. Its programme will, therefore, continue to be based on a broad vision of education that encompasses both values and competences. The programme will aim to support the development of the full potential of learners, taking into account the nature of education as a human right, its powerful function in social inclusion and cohesion, and its unique contribution in the key areas of personal development, culture and values, identity building, appreciating diversity, critical thinking, and its fundamental role in establishing a solid basis for lifelong learning and as a precondition for social cohesion and the enjoyment of other human rights.

Education for a values-based society

The education which is provided for young and less young people is of fundamental importance in determining the society of today and tomorrow. One cannot develop an education policy without a vision of society and one cannot implement a vision of society without a sound education policy. Education policy cannot be reduced to announcing a series of measures: developing an education policy means to put forward a framework based on common values developed through democratic engagement and participation, and constantly reaffirmed.

Education is therefore of crucial importance in developing the kind of society in which we wish to live and which we wish to leave to future generations. It is an essential element in developing a society based on and imbued with the values of the Council of Europe. This society can only be built on the right of every citizen to quality education and on the determination of all citizens to develop their abilities fully. It must value and exploit diversity and difference in education, and reconcile them with the promotion of the rights and responsibility of democratic citizenship, and with the seemingly contradictory requirements of the right to both an inclusive and a quality education for all.

A coherent education policy for diverse, complex societies

Education in Europe must be founded on a coherent view of our societies and the role of education in shaping them. It must provide citizens with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes needed to tackle the challenges with which both Europe and the world are faced. These include the need to provide meaningful employment for all as well as the need to value the diversity that characterises all European societies and to enable all our citizens to live dignified and fruitful lives.

European education systems, policies and practices, therefore, must provide learners with the knowledge, understanding, abilities and attitudes to:

- build and maintain the civic culture that Europe will need to create sustainable societies characterised by a diversity of backgrounds, ways of life, experiences, languages, faiths and convictions in which citizens are committed to living together as equals in dignity;

- develop the wisdom and intergenerational solidarity that Europe will need to face the challenge of ageing societies, where more and more citizens beyond retirement age will have to be sustained either by a dwindling population of working age or by increasing numbers of migrants;

- educate citizens conscious of their rights and their responsibilities, respectful of the private space of others and committed to defining a common future by participating in the public space of our societies;

- combine economic performance and well being with environmental responsibility;

- develop the vision, courage and understanding required to make sound societal decisions on complex issues like climate change and social cohesion, on the basis of incomplete information and with regard not primarily to immediate gain but to long term benefits and the well being of future generations;

- reconcile the need for continued technological and scientific development with the need to develop and maintain an ethical perspective and humanistic values;

- face the needs of a globalised and rapidly developing economy, in which the ability to update knowledge and skills across traditional subject boundaries, in a perspective of lifelong learning, will largely determine whether Europe will remain attractive and competitive at world level.

The Council of Europe’s education policy must help Europeans rise to these challenges, and help member states in their efforts to ensure social cohesion, intercultural understanding and respect for human rights. It must provide all citizens with key competences for living together as responsible citizens in modern, complex and diverse societies. It must be based on the recognition that when it comes to receiving and benefiting from education, we are not all equal even if we seem to have equal opportunities. In sum, it must aim to make education available, accessible, acceptable and adaptable to each and everyone.

To this end, the Steering Committees responsible for educational cooperation1 put forward the proposal for a Council of Europe education programme covering all levels of education from pre-primary and primary through higher education, including the continuing education of adults, within a lifelong learning perspective, with targeted activities in three areas: education for democratic citizenship and human rights, the teaching and learning of history and language education. The elements of this programme are presented under one the Line of Action: Education for intercultural understanding, human rights and democratic culture, as follows:

LINE OF ACTION: EDUCATION FOR INTERCULTURAL UNDERSTANDING, HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRATIC CULTURE

PROGRAMME 1: Promoting social inclusion and combating discrimination in and through education

PROGRAMME 2: Education for the promotion of the core values of the Council of Europe

PROGRAMME 3: Education for intercultural understanding and sustainable democracies

PROGRAMME 4: Higher Education for a Europe of values

Transversal projects

*

* *

EUROPEAN EDUCATION POLICIES FOR INTERCULTURAL UNDERSTANDING, HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRATIC CULTURE

Values and competences

The Declaration of the Council of Europe Conference of Ministers of Education held in Istanbul in May 2007 invited the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe to instruct the Steering Committee for Education to pay special attention to

“analysing and developing key competences for democratic culture and social cohesion, such as citizenship competence, intercultural competence, plurilingual competence, social commitment, a solidarity-based outlook and multiperspectivity”.

At the Bologna ministerial conference in London in May 2007 the Ministers responsible for Higher Education announced that they were “determined to take 2010 as an opportunity to reformulate the vision that motivated us in setting the Bologna Process in motion in 1999 and to make the case for the European Higher Education Area underpinned by values and visions and go beyond issues of structures and tools”. The Council of Europe’s key values – democracy, human rights and the rule of law as well as a commitment to intercultural dialogue – will underpin our education and higher education programme, policies and practice.

The European education of tomorrow must provide learners with well developed competences in a variety of fields and with the values and attitudes needed to put these competences to good use. Learners must combine highly developed skills with the ability to place their advanced understanding of a specific field into its proper context and to ask fundamental questions about the purposes of our societies and of our existence as human beings. Europe needs reflective and ethically aware as well as skilful citizens who are knowledgeable about their rights and able to defend them as well as committed to taking responsibility for themselves and their societies.

The Council of Europe education programme will aim to develop a Council of Europe perspective on the right to quality education for every human being, as an enabling right making education of a certain level of quality a precondition for fully enjoying other human rights. (Projects 1- A: Protecting and promoting the right to quality education in European education systems, 2- A: Learning democracy and human rights in school and out-of-school throughout life).

It recognises that access to quality education is crucial for social inclusion, and that without the necessary kinds of linguistic competence in the language of schooling this access is denied. The Council is concerned with the entitlement of learners to be provided with the language competences and learning experiences that are essential for them to exercise their right to education. In addition, it promotes the right to develop plurilingual competence and a repertoire of languages which includes mother tongue, official languages and modern (foreign) languages (Project 1-B: Language policies and the right to education and social inclusion).

The Council of Europe’s education policy will combine a focus on structural reform with a consideration of how structures, policy and practice can further the main purposes of education, with particular emphasis on the fundamental values of the Council of Europe: democracy, human rights and the rule of law as well as intercultural dialogue. It will emphasize the development of the competences with which higher education will need to provide its learners if they are to be active citizens in democratic, diverse societies that are sustainable in political, cultural, social and economic terms. (Project 4-A: Making the European Higher Education Area a reality beyond 2010).

On this basis, the Council of Europe will contribute to a thorough review of our policies for primary and secondary education, where our systems have not changed radically over the past few decades. The Council will continue to be one of the key actors in the profound reform of higher education policies in which it has been engaged over the past 10 years and which will lead to the setting up of a European Higher Education Area in 2010. It will work through the development and dissemination of good practice (all projects) as well as European standards and common references instruments member states can draw on in standard setting (Projects 1- A: Protecting and promoting the right to quality education in European education systems, 1-B: Language policies and the right to education and social inclusion, 2-A: Learning democracy and human rights in school and out-of-school thoughout life, 4-A: Making the European Higher Education Area a reality beyond 2010). It will combine work at pan-European level with targeted work in and with geographical priority regions and countries, in particular in South East Europe and the New Independent States (all projects).

Drawing on our past for our future

Interaction and convergence as well as tension and conflict have marked the history of Europe. The interaction and convergence touches all areas of our existence, including our values, our art and our culture, our demography and our economy, our technology and our research. It does not represent a linear, unbroken development, nor is it free of contradictions. It encompasses our finest achievements as well as the darkest failures of our past: the development of the notion that all individuals are equals in dignity and in human rights as well as their denial through the Holocaust and other crimes against humanity.

As a result, Europe is a continent characterised by a unique balance of what we have in common as Europeans and the specificities of each of our countries and traditions. Our shared history provides a powerful basis on which to build a Europe without dividing lines. As we mark the 60th anniversary of the Council of Europe, its education programme finds in the fact that the space that is Europe has been characterized by common developments and changes that have led us to the freely expressed desire to build a common future a potent lesson that needs to be transmitted to new generations of Europeans. (Project 3-B: Shared histories for a Europe without dividing lines).

Our past provides us with lessons for our future, both in inspiration to develop the best of our potential to live together in dignity across and in warnings of our capacity for evil when human dignity is denied. (Projects 3- C: Day of Remembrance of the Holocaust and for the Prevention of crimes against humanity, T: Council of Europe programme for the training of education professionals (Pestalozzi Programme) as well as projects 2- A: Learning democracy and human rights in school and out-of-school throughout life, 2-B: Learning the key principles and the functioning of the human rights system, 4-B: Higher education for a Europe of values: call on academic freedom, institutional autonomy and transparency).

Democratic citizenship in a global age

As a result of globalisation, of rapidly increasing private and professional mobility, of the dramatic expansion of migration, and the existence of minority groups in many countries, there is hardly a school or a university in Europe with anything like a homogeneous cultural background. People’s identities are so stratified that it becomes impossible to conceive of them along linear terms. The traditional dialectic between “one’s own identity” and “otherness” fails to take this into account. The “boundaries” of identification become mobile, to the point that we need to speak of compound or multiple identities within the same person in an attempt to describe the complexity of one’s sense of “belonging”.

In a similar way, the Council of Europe’s education programme will seek to develop a new approach to conceiving citizenship which can take into account the local, national, European and global dimensions seen in their “nestedness” and in their political, legal, cultural and socio-economic aspects. “Learning and living together democratically” may take on a dual focus, composed of education for intercultural competence and education for democratic citizenship and human rights, both belonging to the central aspects of the kind of education needed if our vision of sustainable democratic societies is to come true. (Project 3-A: Intercultural education and exchanges). It is conscious of the fact that our histories have not developed in isolation but has learned from and influenced other areas of the world (Project 3-B: Shared histories for a Europe without dividing lines), and it promotes the underlying principles of institutional autonomy and democratic freedom , which are the cornerstones of the heritage of our universities as well as their role as key institutions of modern, democratic and culturally diverse societies. (Project 4-B: Higher education for a Europe of values: call on academic freedom, institutional autonomy and transparency). It is built on a conception of citizenships in which individuals enjoy inherent rights (Project 1- A: Protecting and promoting the right to quality education in European education systems) and in which democratic participation is a right and assumes the ability and willingness to take responsibility for one’s fellow human beings (Projects 2- A: Learning democracy and human rights in school and out-of-school throughout life, 2-B: Learning the key principles and the functioning of the human rights system).

The Council’s education programme will promote a plurilingual vision of education which will facilitate an integrated and coherent approach to the development of policies and reference toll for standard setting for all languages in and for education: national languages, minority and regional languages, new immigrant languages and modern (foreign) languages. Its approach to language education is values-oriented , encouraging appreciation of the value of diversity and active democratic citizenship in the context of education for personal fulfilment. (Project 1-B: Language policies and the right to education and social inclusion).

EDUCATION: DECIDING THE FUTURE OF EUROPE

Public responsibility in a context of diversity and globalisation

As developed through Recommendation Rec (2007) 6 by the Committee of Ministers to member states on the public responsibility for higher education and research and then set out in the Declaration of the Council of Europe Conference of Ministers of Education held in Istanbul in May 2007, education policies must focus on democracy learning as well as on the protection and the full enjoyment of the right to education for all Europeans. They should safeguard the principle of equal opportunities and universal access to a high quality education. They should stress the key role of education for participation in society and for achieving social inclusion. The Ministers recommended that the Council of Europe should address the full range of purposes of education:

    · preparation for the labour market;

    · preparation for life as active citizens in democratic societies;

    · personal development;

    · development and maintenance of a broad and advanced knowledge base.

Education in Europe is founded on the conviction that education is a public asset and a public responsibility. As our societies grow more diverse, and as the diversity of actors in society at large as well as in the education sector continues to expand, the overriding principle of public responsibility for education needs to be reaffirmed through an open-minded and hard-headed consideration of the roles and responsibilities of various actors within an overall framework established by public authorities. We must re-examine the way in which public authority is exercised with a view to ensuring that the principle of public responsibility remains a bearing principle of European education even as our societies change. (Projects 1- A: Protecting and promoting the right to quality education in European education systems, 4-A: Making the European Higher Education Area a reality beyond 2010).

Governing diverse societies based on European values

European societies must be governed through democratic institutions and the rule of law and they must be respectful of human rights and cultural diversity, in accordance with Council of Europe standards. However, institutions and laws alone will not create this culture based on values, those of democracy, human rights and intercultural understanding. The attitudes and skills needed to put these principles into practice should be taught and learned, practised and maintained throughout life.

As recognised by the Warsaw Summit, democratic institutions and democratic legislation will not function unless they are underpinned by democratic culture. Europeans must be imbued with a spirit of democratic citizenship and human rights, mindful of the value of cultural diversity as well as of social cohesion, proficient in intercultural dialogue and endowed with the competences needed to make democracy a living reality of our lives. (Projects 2- A: Learning democracy and human rights in school and out-of-school throughout life,3-A Intercultural education and exchanges; 3-B: Shared histories for a Europe without dividing lines). In few areas is the need to combine specific skills with broad reflective and analytical competences and attitudes of openness and inclusion as evident as here. (Projects 1- A: Protecting and promoting the right to quality education in European education systems, 4-A: Making the European Higher Education Area a reality beyond 2010).

This can only be achieved through education, from pre-primary and primary through secondary, vocational and higher education to lifelong learning. It requires well functioning education systems, adapted education standards and sound education policies and practices. The values transmitted through education must be underpinned by actual education practice: one cannot teach democratic participation for future use in our broader society without also practicing democratic participation in the daily life of schools and universities (Projects 2- A: Learning democracy and human rights in school and out-of-school throughout life, 2-B: Learning the key principles and the functioning of the human rights system, 3-A: Intercultural education and exchanges, 4-B: Higher education for a Europe of values: call on academic freedom, institutional autonomy and transparency, T: Council of Europe programme for the training of education professionals (Pestalozzi Programme)).

EDUCATION IN THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE PROGRAMME

A variety of well adapted implementation mechanisms

The Council of Europe must present a coherent education programme for the period 2010 – 2014; a programme centred on the overarching principles and priorities of the Council of Europe which draws on a variety of traditional as well as newer mechanisms and working methods in making our vision of education an operational reality.

While it is the Committee of Ministers which has the decisional authority over the overall programme of activities of the Organisation, the political guidelines for and validation of the Council of Europe’s education programme stem from the Standing Conference of European Ministers of Education, the next session of which will be held in Slovenia in May 2010. For the higher education part of the programme, important guidelines are also provided by the ministerial conferences of the Bologna Process.

The Council of Europe education programme will be overseen by the Steering Committees for Education (CDED) and for Higher Education and Research (CDESR). While the two Steering Committees will have specific responsibilities within the programme, based on their respective competences and the role of public and other actors in each area, they will cooperate closely in ensuring overall implementation of the programme in accordance with the Council of Europe’s standards and political priorities. They will also cooperate with other pertinent Council of Europe bodies as well as with other international institutions, public authorities and civil society. Structural and functional arrangements will have to be found to improve coordination with the training activities for young people organised within the Directorate of Youth and Sport.

In addition to our long standing working methods, including conferences, seminars, working groups and expert contributions, the Council of Europe education programme will be implemented through and supported by:

- the European Centre for Modern Languages (ECML) in Graz, which implements Council of Europe policy in the Enlarged Partial Agreement’s member states through the development and dissemination of best practice and innovation in language education;

- the mechanisms of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages, which is a unique instrument for protecting and promoting the linguistic diversity that is a key European asset in an age of globalisation;

- the European Higher Education Area, to be established in 2010 on the basis of the Bologna process, and which offers the Council of Europe a unique opportunity to further European values and policies in the framework of a broad platform of public authorities, higher education institutions, staff and students and social partners;

- the Council of Europe programme for the training of education professionals (Pestalozzi Programme), which trains education professionals in Council of Europe standards and values and supports all parts of our education programme;

- the European Wergeland Centre in Oslo, which develops education for intercultural understanding, human rights, awareness of democratic culture and the need for intercultural dialogue among professionals in all areas of education.

PROGRAMME 1 :

Promoting social inclusion and combating discrimination in and through education

The overarching aim of the programme is to promote the right to education for all. Access to quality education is a pre-condition for the enjoyment of other human rights and is crucial for social inclusion. The programme will provide a Council of Europe values-driven perspective on the implementation of the right to quality education, with a focus on intercultural and plurilingual education, the rights of vulnerable groups and public responsibility for providing inclusive quality education. It will develop, among others, guidelines and common reference standards/descriptors to assist ministries of education and other partners in developing and implementing their policies to achieve these policy goals.

The programme will adopt a multidisciplinary approach to the elaboration of common reference elements for the right to quality education, including policy guidelines on public responsibility in this area, descriptions of the language standards/competences that all learners need to acquire for success at school, and guidelines for responding to the challenges of socio-cultural diversity and the needs of vulnerable groups in education systems.

      Project 1- A:

      Protecting and promoting the right to education in European education systems

      Project 1- B:

      Language policies and the right to education and social inclusion

Project 1 – A :

Protecting and promoting the right to quality education in European education systems

Main objectives

The general aim of this project would be to develop policy and practice regarding the right to education for every human being, as an enabling right making quality education a precondition for fully enjoying other human rights (political, civic, social, economic and cultural). The specific objectives of the projects will be as follows: 1) Providing a Council of Europe perspective on the implementation of the right to quality education; 2) Defining public responsibility with regard to the right to quality education; 3) Recognising, protecting and promoting diversity through the exercise of the right to quality education.

Specific objectives

Objective 1. Providing a Council of Europe perspective on the implementation of the right to quality education

1.1 to analyse and bring together the “acquis” of the Council of Europe with regard to the right to education in a transversal and multidisciplinary perspective;

1.2 to prepare a Council of Europe paper setting out the main findings of this analysis and proposing strategies for further developing this right;

Objective 2. Defining public responsibility with regard to the right to quality education

2.1 to examine member states policies and practice regarding the right to quality education with a view to defining and disseminating examples of good practice;

2.2 to prepare a draft recommendation on public responsibility for providing quality education for all;

2.3 to develop common reference standards/descriptors to assist member states to progress with regard to the implementation of the right to quality education for all;

Objective 3. Recognising, protecting and promoting diversity through the exercise of the right to quality education

With regard to the main groups concerned:

3.1 to build on the work already carried out within the Council of Europe with regard to the protection and the promotion of the right to quality education for specific and/or vulnerable social groups, in a perspective of lifelong learning, gender and social cohesion ;

With regard to teacher education:

3.2 develop strategies and tools for the implementation of the Common reference framework for young teachers’ competences on socio-cultural diversity at the level of teachers’ education institutions and at the level of the school;

3.3 enhance capacity-building and encourage exchange of information among all stakeholders in relation to the implementation of the Common reference framework for young teachers’ competences on socio-cultural diversity.

Target and beneficiary groups

Policy and decision-makers at all levels of the education system. People working in educational institutions. Beneficiary groups would be all learners from pre-primary onwards, with a special focus on social groups which may encounter problems in the education systems, people with special needs, migrant and ethnic minority groups such as Roma and Travellers, drop-outs from the school system, persons deprived of their liberty, illiterate people, children with special talents. All these groups would be looked at in a lifelong learning perspective that takes into account gender and social cohesion issues.

Expected results

Objective 1. Providing a Council of Europe perspective on the implementation of the right to quality education

    a. a report on the Council of Europe “acquis” with regard to the right to quality education is prepared;

    b. a policy document proposing strategies for implementing and further developing this right is prepared;

Objective 2. Defining public responsibility with regard to the right to quality education

    a. a report on policy and practice regarding public responsibility with regard to the implementation of the right to education in member states is prepared;

    b. a draft recommendation on public responsibility with regard to the right to quality education is prepared;

    c. common reference standards/descriptors to assist member states to progress with regard to the implementation of the right to quality education are prepared.

Objective 3. Recognising, protecting and promoting diversity through the exercise of the right to quality education

With regard to the main groups concerned:

    a. overview reports on the discriminations in education facing the different groups are prepared by multidisciplinary focus groups and success stories on how to overcome discrimination are identified ;

    b. policy recommendations/guidelines for member states are prepared on basis of these reports;

With regard to teacher education:

    a. a set of policy guidelines for the drafting of framework programmes for teacher education in socio-cultural diversity, citizenship and human rights in the members states is prepared;

    b. a compilation of methodologies to be adapted to learning programmes for teachers in order to prepare them to work on the basis of socio-cultural diversity, citizenship and human rights;

    c. discussions are organised in member states to validate the guidelines and the methodologies, and support systems for the implementation of teacher education programmes in socio-cultural diversity are developed within member states.

Working methods

The project will be led by a multidisciplinary Working/Advisory Group, the members of which will represent all levels of education and different sectors of the Council of Europe. Focus groups will work on specific issues.

The project will be implemented in close cooperation with member states officials and the target/beneficiary groups, and with the sectors concerned of the Council of Europe (Secretariats of the European Social Charter, Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities, Directorate of Social Cohesion, Registry of the European Court of Human Rights).

Partnerships with other organisations, such as UNESCO and UNICEF will be explored.

Added value

This project would allow for the first time to analyse and obtain an overview of the work already done by the Council of Europe regarding the right to quality education. Through this project, this work would be made better known and developed further.

It would bring together the different sectors and partners working on this issue, through a multiperspective and multidisciplinary approach. In this ways it would promote synergies and avoid duplication of work.

It would open up a number of avenues for exploring issues which are particularly relevant in education in member states today, such as public responsibility for providing quality education, how to deal with diversity in society, how to tackle discrimination of vulnerable or specific groups with regard to education on a lifelong learning perspective.

The outcomes of the project could have considerable influence on policies regarding standards for the provision of quality education for the different social groups.

Project 1- B:

Language policies and the right to education and social inclusion

Main objectives

A key aim of this project is to contribute to the Organisation’s work to promote the right to education from the perspective of languages. Access to education is an individual right (European Convention for Human Rights – Article 2 of the First Protocol as amended by Protocol 11) and is crucial for social inclusion. However, without the necessary kinds of linguistic competence in the language of schooling that access is denied.

This project requires a significant shift in focus by the Language Policy Division from foreign languages to the languages of schooling (e.g. Polish in Poland, French in France etc.). It will develop policies guidelines and reference tools that support the entitlement of learners to acquire the fundamental language competences that they need in order to exercise their right to education and take an active part in the life of multicultural, democratic societies.

Starting from Council of Europe values, the project will define the entitlements of learners to plurilingual and intercultural education. This will lead to practical descriptions of educational goals and processes, reference ‘standards’, learning experiences and expected outcomes. The approach adopted will embrace all the languages present in the school within an overarching policy for ‘Languages of Education’. This includes mother tongue, official (national and regional) languages, minority languages, modern and classical languages. One of the project’s main aims is therefore to support learners in developing respect for human rights and to value linguistic and cultural diversity.

The project’s results will be presented in an ongoing manner on a web-based “Platform of Resources and References for Plurilingual and Intercultural Education” that takes account of languages in education as languages for education.

Specific objectives

Specific objective 1

Describing common reference elements for the Language(s) of Schooling with regard to:

- linguistic competences in the language as a school ‘subject’, i.e. the specific teaching and learning of the language;

- the general and subject-specific linguistic competences required by the use of the language of schooling as medium of instruction in other school subjects (e.g. history, science, maths..).

Specific objective 2

Designing and implementing curricula for plurilingual and intercultural education

- to describe the learner’s entitlements with regard to plurilingual and intercultural education by proposing appropriate objectives and learning experiences at different levels of education;

- to provide practical guidelines and tools for developing and implementing curricula, and for assessment, with regard to plurilingual and intercultural education;

- to develop generic portfolio elements to improve the production of European Language Portfolio models (by end 2010), and to examine the feasibility of a new portfolio-type approach within Languages of Education generally.

Specific objective 3

Assisting member states with policy evaluation and planning

- to assist education authorities with self-evaluation, planning and implementation of their language education policies in relation to

(i) Languages of Education (all languages)

(ii) the integration of vulnerable groups, in particular migrant children and adult migrants.

Target and beneficiary groups

Policy makers and curriculum developers responsible for compulsory education, school principals, teacher trainers and teachers of all school subjects, all learners in pre-primary and compulsory education, with an additional focus on migrant and socially disadvantaged children; policy makers, language professionals and NGOs involved in the integration of adult migrants.

Expected results

            - Objective 1 (Languages of Schooling)

            &

            - Objective 2 (Plurilingual and Intercultural Education)

There will be a gradual accumulation of modular elements for these inter-related dimensions on the website ‘Platform’ which will deal not only with languages of schooling but will also integrate current and new work on foreign languages, minority languages and vulnerable groups. Results will include:

      · descriptions of language competences and learning experiences to which learners are entitled for access to education for social inclusion and active democratic citizenship in multicultural societies;

          o competences in the language(s) used as the medium of instruction for all subjects across the curriculum (history, maths, etc.) focusing on the communication competences learners need to be successful at specific educational stages;

          o linguistic competences in the national/official language(s) and minority languages as a subject (for reading, writing, listening, spoken interaction and production, language awareness, literature);

      · Tools for analysing and reviewing current curricula, and the language and communication expectations which are stated or implied in curriculum specifications;

      · Guidelines and support material for designing plurilingual and intercultural curricula based on Council of Europe values and reference standards;

      · Actions and tools to support vulnerable and minority groups in acquiring the necessary competences;

      · Proposals for a possible ‘portfolio’ type approach within Languages of Education (all languages).

            - Objective 3 (Assisting member states with policy evaluation and planning)

(i) Country or Regional or City Reports / Language Education Policy Profiles (on Languages of Education, with an increased focus on Languages of Schooling in addition to other languages);

(ii) Further development and application of policy guidelines and practical tools concerning the linguistic integration of adult migrants (addressing for example, language requirements for residence and citizenship, quality criteria for language training, assessment/certification).

NOTE: The project’s activities will also result in a proposal for a Recommendation concerning the language entitlements of learners in relation to the right to quality education.

Working methods

Launch: the Project will be formally launched at a major Intergovernmental Forum to be hosted by Switzerland in 2010, which will also mark the 50th anniversary of the Council of Europe’s language projects.

Working methods will include:

· Working Group to co-ordinate project development with sub-groups to deal with specific domains and objectives related to the development of the ‘’Platform of Resources and References for Plurilingual and Intercultural Education”
· European and national conferences and seminars

· Co-operation with other Council of Europe sectors and units, primarily:

      - the European Centre for Modern Languages, linking with specific activities such as: A Framework of Reference for Pluralistic Approaches (CARAP); Majority Language Instruction as a Basis for Plurilingual Education; Content and Language Integrated Learning, projects on intercultural competence; ELP; and others to be discussed.

      - Secretariats responsible for relevant Conventions, in particular the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages, Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities, European Commission against Racism and Intolerance; European Committee on Migration (DG III); PACE and CLRAE; Pestalozzi programme;

- European Wergeland Centre (Oslo).

Other possible partners: European Commission, OECD, UNESCO.

Added value

The project’s focus on the language and intercultural competences necessary to facilitate the right to quality education creates a link to the ECHR and other Conventions, and relates directly to the Third Summit Action plan. The proposed descriptions of educational goals and necessary competences for the Languages of Schooling will provide a unique reference source for member states in developing the language dimension of their curriculum and examination standards in various subjects. No European reference instrument of this kind exists, and the work will serve as a useful complement to the PISA activity of the OECD as well as EU and OECD initiatives concerning migrant children. There is particular added value for disadvantaged groups as learning problems are often the result of a limited facility with the ‘academic’ language of the school, which may affect migrant children and low socio-economic status groups.

The project will continue to support the implementation of Council of Europe Recommendations on language policies, including Recommendation (2008) 7 of the Committee of Ministers to member states concerning the use of the Council of Europe’s Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) and the Promotion of Plurilingualism.

The electronic Platform will allow for a flexible presentation of issues and material that are often interrelated and through which users can navigate freely, and will also enable users to contribute to further development through feedback and contributions. The Platform will serve as a stimulus to critical reflection on existing policy, as an inspiration to new approaches and as a focus for sharing good practice.

PROGRAMME 2:

Education for the promotion of the core values of the Council of Europe

This programme supports and promotes the Council of Europe work in its main priority fields: democracy, human rights and the rule of law and builds on the Council of Europe earlier activities in the field of education for democratic citizenship and human rights. As the leading agency in this field, the Council of Europe, through this programme, aims at supporting widespread practice in member states, through policy development, partnerships and networking as well as dissemination and adaptation of tools. The programme as a whole is based on the conviction that education for human rights and democracy is an important tool for preventing human rights violations, and aims at enhancing the competences of education professionals for creating a democratic culture and a culture of human rights in Europe. A specific aspect of the programme will be focused on promoting a better knowledge of the European human rights system and the functioning of its mechanisms.

      Project 2- A:

      Learning democracy and human rights in school and

      out-of-school throughout life

      Project 2- B:

      Learning the key principles and the functioning of the human rights protection system

Project 2-A:

Learning democracy and human rights in school and out-of-school throughout life

Main objectives

The general aim of this project would be to build on ten years activities in the fields of education for democratic citizenship and human rights (EDC/HRE) in order to ensure its widespread practice, in a lifelong learning perspective, and to support its sustainability in member states. The main objectives will be as follows: 1) Supporting policy development and implementation; 2) Promoting partnerships and networking; and 3) Putting CoE instruments into practice.

Issues that were not sufficiently dealt with in the earlier stages of the project will receive specific attention. These issues will be precisely defined through the evaluation of the third phase of the EDC/HRE Project, in 2009.

Specific objectives

Objective 1 - Supporting policy development and implementation

- to prepare a framework policy document, binding or non-binding, setting out common policy orientations for the member states of the Council of Europe in the field of education for democratic citizenship and human rights, based on the experience of the past years and with a view to ensure sustainability of EDC/HRE; accompany this instrument with description of the necessary support structures for implementation;

- to assist member states who so wish in defining their own policies in this field and help them to set up support systems to implement these policies and keep them under review;

Objective 2 - Putting CoE tools and manuals into practice

- to disseminate and promote CoE materials, in particular through co-operation with specialised media;

- to adapt to member States’ needs the tools prepared in recent years and assist with their implementation in different contexts and at different levels;

- to develop methodological guides to support the implementation of the existing tools;

- to define learners’ EDC/HRE competences at all levels of the school system and in a lifelong learning perspective, develop relevant tools and support their implementation;

Objective 3 - Promoting partnerships and networking

- to reinforce co-operation among EDC/HRE coordinators, in particular through projects targeting special issues of concern (ex. quality assurance in EDC/HRE);

- to promote bilateral and regional projects. In this framework, networks of education professionals (teachers, school leaders, NGOs), researchers and education institutions will be supported;

- building on the existing tools, to provide criteria and guidelines for partnerships, in particular at the local level, among schools, local authorities, NGOs, community groups and universities with a view to provide opportunities for out-of-school and lifelong learning.

Target and beneficiary groups

Policy and decision-makers at all levels of the education systems. People working in educational institutions (head teachers, educators), local communities, NGOs, parents’ groups, foundations, learners at all ages.

Expected outcomes

The project as a whole aims at producing pragmatic and practical outcomes, such as support systems for the implementation of EDC/HRE in member states.

Objective 1 - Supporting policy development and implementation

A framework policy document on education for democratic citizenship and human rights is drafted and submitted to the Committee of Ministers via the Steering Committee for Education for adoption;

Introduction and/or reform of education policies in member states are supported through the promotion of EDC/HRE principles and policies in curricula, teacher training and school governance in a number of member states (e.g. expertise and advice could be provided by means of studies and recommendations, round tables and study visits);

Objective 2 - Putting CoE tools and manuals into practice

Council of Europe tools are disseminated and promoted (e.g. an on-line database with EDC/HRE Pack and other materials, training and awareness raising activities and publications in specialised media);

Implementation of the tools is facilitated (e.g. through development of methodological guides and other materials, adaptation to member States’ and regional contexts).

EDC/HRE instruments targeting special groups or specific themes are developed (such as a Tool on EDC/HRE competences for learners) based, for example, on the recommendations of the 5th Prague Forum;

Objective 3 - Promoting partnerships and networking

Creation and / or further development of sustainable networks of education professionals (teachers, school leaders) and of institutions, such as schools, teacher training institutes, universities with special interest in this field is supported (e.g. further development of the EDC/HRE coordinators’ network, South East Europe, Black Sea and Baltic and Nordic networks through thematic meetings and publications, development and maintenance of on-line platforms for communication and publication of newsletters).

Working methods

The project would be led by a Working/Advisory Group, composed of experts in EDC/HRE representing early childhood, primary, secondary, higher and adult education and the NGO sector, including youth. Representatives of the CDED and the network of EDC/HRE coordinators will participate in the work of the Group in order to ensure adequate links. Representatives of other committees (ex. Steering Committee for Higher Education and Research (CDESR), the Joint Council on Youth (CMJ), European Committee for Social Cohesion (CDCS), Steering Committee for Human Rights (CDDH)) and of Council of Europe institutions (ex. PACE, CLRAE, HR Commissioner’s office and the Conference of INGOs) will be invited to the meetings of the Group, with a view to support synergies and co-operation with the sectors concerned.

The project will be implemented in close co-operation with the target groups, and in particular with the member states EDC/HRE coordinators’ network. This will require the consolidation of the network of the EDC/HRE co-ordinators, e.g. through a developed web-based communication system.

In terms of partnerships with other organistations, close co-operation with other international organisations working on human rights education, such as relevant UN agencies, the European Union, OSCE/ODIHR and International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) will continue. Possibilities for co-operation with the EU Fundamental Rights Agency, the Organisation of American States (OAS), ALECSO and Anna Lindh Foundation will be explored.

The European Resource Centre on Education for Intercultural Understanding, Human Rights and Democratic Citizenship (European Wergeland Centre) will be a privileged partner. Inside the Council of Europe, co-operation with the Pestalozzi programme, the Higher Education Division, the Youth Directorate, the European Youth Centres in Strasbourg and Budapest and the North South Centre in Lisbon will be further developed.

The success of this project will depend on a very flexible management, through appropriate working methods adopted both by the Secretariat and the participants in the projects. Multiple contacts and networks in and among member states will be necessary and the use of new technologies in this context will be crucial.

Added value

The project will allow the Council of Europe to reinforce its leading role in the field of learning democracy and human rights. This role is based on 10 years of experience, and is acknowledged by other partners (such as the OHCHR, UNESCO, OSCE/ODIHR and the European Union).

The project will allow the consolidation of the “acquis” in this field and further support the promotion of democracy and human rights in educational institutions in the member states.

The Council of Europe will provide a broad framework for inter-governmental co-operation in this field, within which each country can participate in accordance with its priorities. This flexible and constructive approach helps ensure high level of commitment of the member states. In this context, a stronger role will be attributed to the EDC/HRE coordinators.

The Council of Europe will continue to bring together various partners (e.g. international institutions, governments, education professionals and civil society actors) and to support co-operation and exchange.

The inter-disciplinary and intersectorial composition of the Ad-hoc Advisory Group on EDC/HRE will help to build synergies and to avoid duplication with other sectors.

The existence of a framework policy document would favour higher level of commitment among member states, and provide a joint framework for specific actions to be taken. It would therefore be crucial for closing the “gap” between policy and practice in member states identified by the All-European study on education for democratic citizenship in 2002 and by the Human Rights Commissioner in 2008. It would also favour cooperation between member states, as countries could usefully assist each other in preparing and implementing their policies.

It would give the message that education for human rights and democracy is an important tool for preventing human rights violations, for creating a democratic culture and a culture of human rights in Europe. It would give the Council of Europe a leading role as an Organisation strongly committed to the principles of human rights and democracy.

Project 2 - B:

“Learning the key principles and the functioning of the human rights protection system”

The main objective of this project is to ensure an effective implementation and respect of Human rights in the education sector through a better understanding of the principles of the European Human Rights system and the functioning of its mechanisms.

Specific objectives

Objective 1 - Enabling European secondary school students to become familiar with the key principles of European law relating to human rights and to understand how the European Court of Human Rights and other important CoE monitoring bodies work.

1.1 Increase awareness of young Europeans and their teachers (and school heads) about the work done by the Court; introduce European Human rights law to them and help them understanding its links with national law as well as its impact for European societies.

1.2 Encourage participation, dialogue and synergies in the process of implementation among all actors involved: students, teachers, and judges.

Objective 2 – Fostering the teachers’ role and responsibilities as key actors in ensuring an effective implementation of the principles of the European human rights system.

2.1 - To offer member countries policy guidance on fostering the teachers’ freedoms and responsibilities within the education systems on the basis of the principles of the European human rights system.

2.2 - Enhancing the capacities of the education sector staff (principals, administrators, technical support staff, psychologists, social assistants etc) in relation to the practical implementation of the principles of the European human rights system.

Expected Results

Objective 1 - Enabling European secondary school students to become familiar with the key principles of European law relating to human rights and to understand how the European Court of Human Rights and other important CoE monitoring bodies work.

1.1 Increase awareness of young Europeans and their teachers (and school heads) about the work done by the Court, introduction to European Human rights law and understanding its links with national law as well as its impact for the European societies.

    a. Organise thematic discussions on the evolution and the development of the human rights system and its role in shaping the European societies as well as on key human rights guaranteed by the ECHR European Court of Human Rights as well as other important CoE monitoring bodies;

    b. Develop teaching materials, lesson plans and/or activities enabling students in the classes concerned to understand how judgments implement key human rights instruments, how they help to establish European case-law in this field, where they stand in comparison with existing legislation in the member states and how the latter had to be adapted where necessary;

    c. Creation of “Information Days” about the European Human rights system in schools;

    d. Draw up documents and recommendations for making the European case-law accessible to a young readership, including if appropriate commentaries by national judges on the impact of the judgments on their respective countries;

1.2 Support the learning process through the promotion of participation, dialogue and synergies among all actors involved: students, teachers and judges

    a. To establish a network of secondary schools in every member state working on key judgments of the Court;

    b. To foster a spirit of competition between schools in the same country through an annual competition centred on the blogs of participating schools, with the winners being invited to Strasbourg to attend deliberations of the Court and to write on-the-spot reports for publication on their blogs (in their language of schooling as well as English and French versions);

    c. To use IT to encourage the young people to find out about the Court and how it works (via online multimedia documents, chat forums …), publish (on blogs) research conducted in schools, communicate with other schools in their country and abroad on the basis of their work, facilitate dialogue between the national judge and students involved in the project.

Objective 2 – Fostering the teachers role and responsibilities as key actors in building democratic schools and ensuring an effective implementation of the principles of the European human rights system.

2.1 To offer the member countries policy guidelines on fostering the teachers freedoms and responsibilities within the education systems on the basis of the principles of the European human rights system.

    a. An explicit, mutually agreed conceptual basis at the European level for the freedoms and responsibilities of teachers in primary and secondary education;

    b. A draft Charter, embodying the above elements, of teachers’ freedoms and responsibilities, designed to afford them a protective, enriching framework for their professional activity in accordance with Council of Europe values.

    c. An ethical code which incorporates the emerging concerns about the use of ICTs in training;


2.2 Enhancing the capacities of the education sector staff (principals, administrators, technical support staff, psychologists, social assistants etc) in relation to the practical implementation of the principles of the European human rights system.

    a. Organisation of thematic discussions concerning the practical implementation of the principles of human rights in the school environment. Examples of themes envisaged: academic freedom and censorship, objectiveness, copyright, violence, relationship with the families and the other components of the educational community, questions linked with human rights and socio-cultural diversity. Furthermore, the emerging topics linked with ICTs will be discussed: creation, copyright, on-line training, and tutorship.

    b. Teaching material available online (and possibly via other media) for secondary teachers wishing to work with their students on the key elements of European law concerning human rights, the democratic functioning of political and public institutions. In particular, documents making accessible to a young readership a number of judgments by the Court, which are of key significance for the evolution of European law;

Target groups:

    1. Secondary students (ISCED 3).

    2. Secondary teachers responsible for teaching law, history, civic and human rights education or, more generally, anything which concerns human rights and citizenship.

    3. Heads of secondary schools.

Working Methods

      - Group work in secondary schools, with the support of school heads (school project) and teachers’ participation;

      - Provision of prior information to teachers and school heads and of multimedia teaching material;

      - Involvement of judges at the Court and members of other CoE monitoring bodies in choosing the judgments and making them accessible to a young readership and in supporting the students from the country which they represent;

      - Use of IT for:

          · networking of participating schools: a national network and international network;

          · information researching, access to resources provided by the COE, by students and by their teachers;

          · communication between participants (students, teachers, judges);

          · publication of research results by students (multilingual blogs);

      - Motivational support through an annual blogs competition offering the young winners and their teachers a trip to Strasbourg to meet the judges and attend hearings at the Court.

For participating countries:

    - organising information days for teachers with a member of the steering team and a judge from the participating country;

    - organising the annual competition and the trip to, and reception in, Strasbourg of the winning classes.

For the steering group:

    - meetings;

    - video recordings (interviews with judges, additions to and updates of existing video documents…);

    - subtitling or dubbing of video documents in participating countries’ languages;

    - drawing up teaching documents; translation;

    - setting up and monitoring a website for the project, including help with creating blogs and communication tools for participants.

Added value

The main added value of this project proposal is its innovative nature and its relevance to the current priorities of the intergovernmental cooperation of the Council of Europe.

The project aims at promoting among the younger generations in Europe the European Court of Human Rights and its case-law and possibly other Human rights instruments and their monitoring bodies (CPT, European Social Charter, ECRI etc.). The education sector should definitely assume this task and encourage, through the project activities the understanding of the European Human Rights System, favouring respect for the justice system and the political and public institutions.

In relation to the second objective the added value lies in the innovative nature of the theme, hitherto not tackled by other partner organisations, and an explicit drawing closer to the fundamental mission of the Council of Europe. Furthermore, the project will add something to the vision of tomorrow’s European teachers, on behalf of whom the Council of Europe speaks. Also this theme reflects the current concerns of the teaching profession in many Member States.

It is also a response to the White Paper recommendation on preparation of a number of practical tools for education for democratic citizenship, democracy and human rights.

PROGRAMME 3:

Education for intercultural understanding and sustainable democracies

The main aim of this programme is to transform into reality the principles and orientations of the White Paper for Intercultural Dialogue. This implies an ambitious action to enable schools to be the instrument for the transmission of the fundamental values and the creation of the necessary conditions for intercultural dialogue within a sustainable democracy open to the world. The three projects which make up this programme concretely contribute to this action in their respective fields by pursuing the following objectives:

    - the definition and the ways of acquiring intercultural competences by the students as well as their teachers;

    - awareness-raising of interactions, convergences and historical and cultural specificities between the different parts of European societies and/or between the Member States themselves in a spirit of tolerance;

    - the promotion of the fundamental values of human rights, mutual respect, inclusive diversity and rejection of racism and discrimination through dialogue and prevention of crimes against humanity.

This programme aims to clarify the conceptual framework and translate it into political orientations and recommendations to the Member States and into the production of pedagogical material directly applicable in the classroom or in the framework of teacher training. The three projects set up in this perspective constitute a coherent whole and will be developed in close co-ordination.

      Project 3- A: Intercultural education and exchanges

      Project 3- B: Shared histories for a Europe without dividing lines

      Project 3- C: Day of Remembrance of the Holocaust and for the Prevention of crimes against humanity

Project 3- A

Intercultural education and exchanges

Main objective

In line with the policy dimension of intercultural competence outlined in the White paper on Intercultural Dialogue the general aim of this project is to offer an educational framework for the development of intercultural competence, as well as practical tools and guidelines in order to support the implementation of intercultural education in mainstream curricula. It will also seek to enhance the recognition and valorisation of innovative practice through a Council of Europe label in this field.

The main objective of the project is to provide the rationale and conceptual framework as well as the necessary instruments for the full integration of the development of the appropriate key competences and predispositions as a constituent part into mainstream curriculum.

It consists of two specific objectives:

    - Competence development for intercultural education

    - Council of Europe label for intercultural education

Objective 1 - Competence development for intercultural education

To promote the organised development of intercultural understanding in primary and secondary education and to equip all learners with the key competences for living together in modern, complex and diverse societies and to develop pedagogical ressources.

Target group

This project is targeted at formal and non-formal education across Europe and the direct beneficiaries are all those involved in particular, pupils, teachers, school heads, parents and the community.

Expected results/ outcomes

An educational framework for the full integration of intercultural education into the curriculum is at the disposal of member states

    - Elaboration of a framework based on the outcome of previous projects

    - Organisation of a consultation process

Appropriate pedagogical instruments and resources are available

    - Elaboration and piloting of pedagogical instrument and resources for teaching and for training

    - Implementation and further development of the Autobiography of Intercultural Encounters

Training for the development of intercultural competence

    - Training of teacher trainers and teachers in cooperation with the Pestalozzi Programme

Wide and effective dissemination of the framework and pedagogical resources

    - The framework and the pedagogical instruments and resources are made available on the Council of Europe web site

    - Different language versions of the key documents are produced in cooperation with the member states

Assessing the effectiveness of the proposed measures

    - Setting up and running action research into the most effective ways of measuring the impact of the proposed educational measures on the intercultural competence of individuals

Working methods

Working Group to coordinate and steer the process. Expert groups to elaborate draft texts. Network of trainers and multipliers are established and trained in cooperation with the Pestalozzi Programme in order to become effective multipliers of the this approach. Appropriate cooperation with the European Wergeland Centre will be sought.

Added value

A Council of Europe framework on the development of intercultural competence will offer the strategic perspective and orientation which is needed to lead education system to review, rethink and renew what they undertake in terms of fostering understanding, learning and enacting intercultural behaviour and relations at school and outside it .

The elaborated exemplary pedagogical instruments and resources as well as the network of multipliers will assist member states in moving from policy to practice so that the desired changes change the actual practice of teaching and learning in the classrooms of the wider Europe..

Objective 2 - Council of Europe label for intercultural education

To highlight innovative initiatives in intercultural education on the classroom and school level in the member states of the Council of Europe through the creation of a pan-European platform to offer international recognition for successful initiatives and to stimulate and motivate others

Target group

This project is targeted at formal and non-formal education across Europe and the direct beneficiaries are all those involved in particular, pupils, teachers, school heads, parents and the community.

Expected results/ outcomes

A Council of Europe label for intercultural education is awarded annually

    - Description of the rationale, structure and functioning of the label scheme

    - Set-up of an international steering structure

    - Set-up of national steering structures

    - Set-up of partnerships with international organisations and institutions

    - Launch of the label scheme

    - Annual organisation of the label scheme

A platform for exchange of successful practice and experiences is functioning

    - Set-up of a dedicated web site including information, documentation, communication and data base functions

    - Continued maintenance and moderation of the web site

A pan-European network of label schools is involved in whole school partnerships and individual pupil exchanges

    - Promotion of school partnerships and individual pupil exchanges within the network of labelled schools

    - Dissemination of guidelines for school partnerships and individual exchanges in an intercultural education perspective

    - Facilitation of the exchanges via an online platform for communication and exchange

    - Documentation of experiences of these exchanges via the dedicated web site

Teachers and school heads as well as parents and community representatives are trained for the successful organisation and running of whole school partnerships and individual pupil exchanges

    - Organisation of specific training activities for the different target groups involved

    - Elaboration and dissemination of appropriate and adapted training resources

Working methods

A working group to elaborate a detailed description of the rationale, structure and functioning of the label scheme. International steering group, national steering groups, partnerships with international institutions and organisations in particular with the European Wergeland Centre.

Added value

A Council of Europe label for intercultural education will generate motivation and stimulation by recognising and the valorisation of what schools are concretely doing to build intercultural competence within their own environments, whether on the classroom or school level, whether for the individual learners or for the local communities of which schools are a part. It may also act as a motivational lever fostering a change of mindset in practitioners and policy makers and thus support the embedding of intercultural education as something much more than “extra subject matter” but as a “new way of being […] a "metanoia" - a conversion of the mind, a new way of looking at the world”.

Project 3-B:

Shared histories for a Europe without dividing lines

Interactions and convergences, as much as tensions and conflicts, have left their imprint on the history of Europe’s living space. Despite the great diversity of cultures and identities, its inhabitants embarked on the process of European co-operation and construction after the second world conflict, and this was because all through the course of history the European realm has undergone developments and transformations common to every part and people, the upshot of which has been a freely expressed resolve to build a united future. Our history has made Europe a continent distinctive in the unique combination of our common features and the peculiarities that are the hallmark of each of our countries.

These interactions and convergences, which have been neither straightforward nor free from contradictions, have affected a variety of fields. They have concerned values, art and culture, demography, the economy, science and technology, lifestyles, spatial planning, and so on.

The selection of themes to be taken into consideration will be made on the basis of criteria such as the involvement of all European countries, mobility of persons and goods, of technology, ideas and designs, and presence of interactions with other civilisations. Without pre-judging the final choice of the main thrusts of the work, possible examples that may be mentioned are European unification, the major economic, technological or scientific transformation, population movements, and artistic trends that marked the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Main objectives

The project will set out to:

    - reveal the chief interactions and convergences which have characterised the development of Europe as a spatial entity and created the conditions for European unification;

    - produce definite proposals for strategies and methods towards awareness and knowledge of this dimension of European history in the context of courses of instruction in history;

    - define the contents but also the skills – of history teachers especially – essential to a sound understanding of the European history’s common tendencies in a European context looking open to the world.

Target group

Decision makers in the sphere of policies on history teaching, curriculum designers, trainers of history teachers and producers of teaching material.

Anticipated results:

- Preparation of teaching materials relating to meaningful historical examples of interactions and convergences within the European dimension;

- Recommendations as to the strategies, methods and teaching technique which would be conducive to fuller awareness, comprehension and knowledge of these interactions and convergences:

- Specific proposals on history teacher training in this context and in particular on the acquisition and transmission of the requisite skills.

 

Working methods

 

The project will be implemented by a project group associating historians, curriculum designers, producers of educational material and trainers of history teachers.

Select groups of specialised experts will be formed to prepare and test the teaching material on the themes to be selected by the project group in consultation with the CDED. Production of these materials will proceed in the framework of a methodology and a teaching approach which are active with a multiple perspective and focus on acquisition of identified key abilities.

History teachers’ basic and in-service training bodies will be closely associated with all stages of the project (particularly in conjunction with the CDESR) and with the INGOs active in these fields.

 

Added value

 

Following in the wake of the project on “The image of the other in history teaching” which showed how the appreciation and learning of specific histories can be tackled in the classroom, this project will make it possible to demonstrate by means of practical examples how diversity can also be stimulate creativity and shared progress.

 

The project will further allow the realisation in educational practice of the wish already expressed in the European Cultural Convention to make Europeans aware not only of the history of other nations and states but also of their common history. This concern has also been regularly reiterated, the latest occasion being the Warsaw Summit.

 

Likewise, the project will also be consistent with the guidelines adopted in the White Paper on Intercultural dialogue by demonstrating the productivity of interactions between the European context and other contexts and civilisations.

Project 3-C:

Day of Remembrance of the Holocaust and for the Prevention of Crimes against Humanity

Main objective

Generally speaking, education for remembrance seeks to contribute to the overall action for the promotion of human rights, mutual respect, inclusive diversity, and prevention of all forms of racism and discrimination.

The paramount goal is to foster understanding, tolerance and friendship among nations, ethnic groups and religious communities while remaining true to the fundamental values of the Council of Europe.

The project sets out to promote the teaching of Holocaust remembrance and education for prevention of crimes against humanity, in order to help pupils discover and understand the grim events of European and world history and recognise the uniqueness of the Shoah as the first deliberate attempt to exterminate a people in modern history.

Specific objectives

Objective 1 - to embed teaching about the Holocaust in Europe so that it is not a passing fashion, but so that this education for remembrance endures after those who directly witnessed the event have passed away.

    1.1 Raising decision-makers’ awareness of the need to develop the teaching of remembrance, particularly the Ministries of Education, Home Affairs, Social Integration, Defence, Foreign Affairs and Health.

    1.2 Making opinion formers at all territorial levels realise the necessity of this teaching in a European, national and local framework.

    1.3 Making the media and the information distribution networks appreciate the link between teaching of remembrance and civic actions to build a democratic, humanist Europe.

Expected results:

    a. Teaching about the Holocaust becomes a fixture in all countries of Europe, at the level of the compulsory education syllabus.

    b. Involvement of state authorities in the programme of the “Day of Remembrance of the Holocaust and for the Prevention of Crimes against Humanity”, whether internally (choosing a national date for countries which have not yet done so, and magnitude of the budget devoted to the subject), or internationally (funding of training courses, publications or projects associated with the Council of Europe day of remembrance).

Objective 2- to advance reflection on teaching about the Shoah and other crimes against humanity, with two leitmotivs: how to avoid trauma for children in passing on this experience to them; act rather than react; instead of asking what kind of Europe we shall leave to our children, ask what kind of children we shall leave tomorrow’s Europe.

2.1 Offering knowledge on the content but also the technique of teaching remembrance, without losing sight of the dimension of preventive action against all forms of racism and exclusion.

2.2 Arrive in 2015 at a standard body of knowledge in Europe concerning the Shoah, with in addition country-specific knowledge.

Expected results:

    a. Trainers of trainers and university lecturers have undergone training through which they learn how to teach this extremely important and touchy subject.

    b. Easily accessible teaching material is prepared, in order to offer future teachers instruments within their reach and specially designed for the levels of classes for which they are responsible.

    c. Older teachers not having benefited from a course on Shoah education at university level as part of the compulsory curriculum will be able to undergo in-service training, providing basic knowledge on the subject as well as the educational tools which they can apply directly in their classes.

    d. Provision of simple teaching guides directed at teachers not specialising in the question and wishing to deal with it in one hour, on the occasion of Holocaust remembrance day, or to join in a school project (trip to Auschwitz for example).

Target groups:

High-level representatives of the member states (Ministries of Education)

Trainers of trainers, education lecturers, teachers, students, including those in vocational and technical schools, journalists, medical profession, the arts.

International organisations: OSCE, UN, UNESCO, EU

Specialised international and national bodies: Task Force for International Co-operation, Shoah Memorial, Yad Vashem, USHMM

Other transversal projects

The prevention campaign against all forms of discrimination, racism, anti-Semitism and hostility to Roma, with the emphasis on the media, will have areas of convergence with the activities of Holocaust Remembrance Day.

In particular, under the Pestalozzi programme, journalists, trainers of journalists and lecturers in communication will benefit from training programmes on the Holocaust, its mechanisms of exclusion, anti-Semitism and its consequences. It is impossible to work today on exclusion in Europe without knowledge of its roots, which we have inherited.

Co-operation with the Task Force or with international organisations and the organisation of joint activities

Added value

The specific educational project that is the "Day of Remembrance of the Holocaust and for the prevention of crimes against humanity" of the Council of Europe can:


- Implement teachers training in the form of multicultural European workshops, ad hoc

teachers training sessions in a Member State, regional workshops and ministerial

seminars;
- Disseminate, test and evaluate the teaching tools proposed by the Council of Europe;
- Develop close cooperation with other organisations working in this field education from

      memory, especially with the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research.

Racism and anti-Semitism have not vanished from second-millennium Europe. Studying the past is not an end in itself. Education departments bear a responsibility in laying down priorities as regards instruction, curriculum and material aiding the transmission of knowledge, attitudes and inclusive values, by linking the teaching of Holocaust remembrance and civic actions aimed at building a Europe founded on democratic humanist values.

PROGRAMME 4 : Higher Education for a Europe of values

The European Higher Education Area (EHEA) will be established in 2010. It will, however, need to be developed further. While profound changes have been brought about in the years following the adoption of the Bologna Declaration, there is a need for a clear strategy to make the European Higher Education Area a reality and to address new challenges in higher education. Structural reforms must be linked to a broader vision of the role of higher education in developing European societies and on the basic values of higher education as outlined in Recommendation Rec(2007)6 on the public responsibility for higher education and research as well as Parliamentary Assembly Recommendation 1762 (2006) on academic freedom and university autonomy. Higher education in Europe is founded on the conviction that it is a public asset and a public responsibility. As our societies grow more diverse, and as the diversity of actors continues to expand, we must review the way in which public authority is exercised and higher education is organised and structured with a view to ensuring that the overriding principle of public responsibility remains a bearing principle of European higher education as our societies change. The EHEA offers the Council of Europe a unique opportunity to further European values and policies in the framework of a broad platform of public authorities, higher education institutions, staff and students and social partners.

      Project 4-A: Making the European Higher Education Area a reality beyond 2010

      Project 4-B: Higher education for a Europe of values: call on academic freedom, institutional autonomy and transparency

Project 4- A: Making the European Higher Education Area a reality beyond 2010

Main objectives

The European Higher Education Area (EHEA) will be established in 2010, when the Bologna Process will have reached its goal. The EHEA will, however, be far from static, and it will need to be developed further. While profound changes have been brought about in the years following the adoption of the Bologna Declaration, there is a need for a clear strategy to realise the European Higher Education Area and to address new challenges in higher education.

As a key player in the Bologna Process, the Council of Europe can greatly contribute to the European higher education reform process by:

    - broadening the focus on structural reform that has been a characteristic of the Bologna Process to encompass a consideration of how structures, policy and practice can further the main purposes of higher education, with particular emphasis on the fundamental values of the Council of Europe: democracy, human rights and the rule of law as well as intercultural dialogue;

    - emphasizing the development of the competences with which higher education will need to provide its learners if they are to be active citizens in democratic, diverse societies that are sustainable in political, cultural, social and economic terms;

    - reinforcing the political commitment to mobility for students and staff throughout the European Higher Education Area as well as in a global context, in particular through fair recognition of qualifications on the basis of full implementation of the Council of Europe/UNESCO Recognition Convention (ETS 165);

    - leading the process of developing a common understanding and vision of qualifications and their role in modern society, in particular the development and implementation of national qualifications frameworks based on learning outcomes – what learners know, understand and are able to do – rather than on formal procedures;

    - emphasising the need to review the link between higher education and research with a view to enabling higher education to fulfil its full range of purposes and to enabling society to make good use of research results;

    - working towards a globally engaged European higher education, in particular by strengthening North-South co-operation, intercultural dialogue and the development of democratic culture;

    - assisting the target countries in South East Europe and Newly Independent States in strengthening their higher education reform process and their implementation of the key policies of the EHEA;

Target groups

This project is targeted at higher education decision and policy makers in public authorities and higher education institutions. Beneficiary groups will include students, as there is an increasing emphasis in the higher education reform on student-centred learning, staff and higher education institutions.

Expected results

    - contribution to the full implementation of the Council of Europe/UNESCO Lisbon Recognition Convention through consistent work of the ENIC-NARIC networks;

    - contribution to the finalisation of setting up national qualifications frameworks by sharing national experiences through the work of the Bologna Coordination Group on Qualifications Frameworks, chaired by the Council of Europe, as well as to the continued implementation and development of frameworks;

    - achievement of common understanding on qualifications, including competences for democratic culture and intercultural dialogue in higher education;

    - developing guidelines on competences for citizenship in democratic, diverse societies that are sustainable in political, cultural, social and economic terms;

    - contribution to ensuring social cohesion in higher education through equal opportunities and flexible life-learning paths;

    - creation of a platform for constructive mutual dialogue on higher education issues with the countries outside Europe, in particular emphasising North-South co-operation;

    - consolidation of the network on qualifications framework in South East Europe, which was set up in 2008 and setting up of a similar network in the Newly Independent States; developing a set of other regional and bilateral activities to step up higher education reform process;

Working methods

The project will be supervised by the Steering Committee for Higher Education and Research. The main work will be carried out by the Secretariat and experts under the close supervision of the Bureau of the Steering Committee, as well as other relevant bodies, in particular the Bologna Coordination Group on Qualifications Frameworks, chaired by the Council of Europe.

The project and its objectives will be advanced through topical conference, seminars, debates and network meetings. The objectives will also be implemented regionally and on a national basis within the framework of the Council of Europe regional and bilateral co-operation activities in higher education.

Results will be made available to the interested target groups through publications in the Council of Europe higher education series and on the higher education website.

Added value

The European Higher Education Area is now a framework for higher education policies and reforms throughout Europe. The European Cultural Convention is the framework for the EHEA, and 46 of the 49 States party are now (as of October 2008) members of the EHEA.

This project will provide an important contribution to the strategic development of the European Higher Education Area in 2010-2014, emphasising values and standards for democracy, human rights and the rule of law, improving cohesion between purposes and values on the one hand and structure, policies and practice on the other. The strong involvement with the EHEA has significantly strengthened the visibility of the Council of Europe in this policy area, and continued strong involvement is essential to maintaining this profile.

Project 4-B: Higher Education for a Europe of Values: Academic Freedom, Institutional Autonomy and Transparency’

Main objectives

This project will build up on the results of the project 2008/DG4/1366 ‘Promoting Intercultural Dialogue and Democratic Culture through higher education, as well as on the previous activities linked to university governance and public responsibility for higher education.

The underlying principles of institutional autonomy and democratic freedom are the cornerstone of the universities as institutions. Magna Charta Universitatum addresses the role of autonomous higher education institutions and by now has over 600 higher education institutions as signatories.

The objective of this project is to focus on the roles and responsibilities of public authorities in promoting the basic values of higher education in Europe – in particular academic freedom, institutional autonomy and student participation - as well as transparency in higher education.

This can be accomplished by:

    - developing international instrument(s) addressing the role of public authorities in ensuring academic freedom and institutional autonomy, as a complement to the Magna Charta Universitatum, which addresses the role of autonomous higher education institutions;

    - developing international instrument(s) ensuring transparency and combating corruption in higher education;

    - adopting an authoritative policy statement or recommendation on the role of higher education in furthering European values, democratic culture and intercultural dialogue in modern societies, including the democratisation of research results;

    - complement standard-setting measures with practical measures and initiatives, which are focused on networking, consolidation of examples of good practice and their dissemination;

    - providing expert and policy advice to the countries, tackling problems related to transparency in higher education;

Target groups

Higher education decision and policy makers in public authorities and higher education institutions. Beneficiary groups will be students, staff and higher education institutions.

Expected results

    - development of an international instrument addressed to public authorities ensuring academic freedom and institutional autonomy;

    - development of an international instrument ensuring transparency and combating corruption in higher education;

    - adoption of an authoritative policy statement or recommendation on the role of higher education in furthering European values, democratic culture and intercultural dialogue in modern societies;

    - consolidation of the network of democratic culture on higher education, which was set up in the aftermath of the 2006 Forum on Democratic Culture in Higher Education;

    - consolidation and dissemination of examples of good practice in ensuring democratic governance and culture, intercultural dialogue and transparency in higher education

Working methods

The project will be supervised by the Steering Committee for Higher Education and Research. The main work will be carried out by the Secretariat and experts under close supervision of the Bureau of the Steering Committee.

The project and its objectives will be advanced through topical conference, seminars, debates.

Results will be made available to the interested target groups through publications in the Council of Europe higher education series and on the higher education website.

Added value

The added value of this project consists in reviewing how key values of European higher education can remain a cornerstone of modern European societies, as well as in adding a new dimension to the European higher education reform process through development of new international legal and practical instruments.

TRANSVERSAL PROJECT

Council of Europe programme for the training of education professionals (Pestalozzi Programme)

The Pestalozzi programme for the training of education professionals offers a unique support to member states through its approach to teacher training and teacher development, with its special focus on the implementation of CoE values, standards and recommendations in education. It covers the full range of actions and activities that the Council of Europe engages in and promotes in the field of education. It aims at developing the competences education professionals need to promote human rights, democracy and intercultural understanding, in the increasingly heterogeneous and multicultural European societies. Building on the earlier stages of the Pestalozzi programme, it will continue to offer a platform for education professionals to become multipliers for Council of Europe standards and principles, where they can dialogue and develop their competences. As a whole, this programme constitutes a strong support for the implementation of the core values of the Council of Europe.

Transversal Project

Council of Europe programme for the training of education professionals (Pestalozzi Programme)

Introduction

Education needs to be governed by a vision of the society we want, and we want our children to live in.

In his book, El sueño chileno2—the Chilean dream, the Chilean sociologist Eugenio Tironi says that the answer to the question, what kind of education do we need? is to be found in the answer to another question: what kind of society do we want? The vision of society which probably best reflects the basic principles and values the Council of Europe stands for may best be described as a vision for a “sustainable democratic society”.

“Education for sustainable democratic societies” offers an overarching rationale for the full range of actions and activities the Council of Europe engages in and promotes in the field of education as well as it underlines the specific character and added value of its action in the concert of other international players.

Without education there will be no effective change for the better.

It is true that education alone cannot eliminate all the misery of the world! The will for change needs to be reflected in every sectors of the society (public, private) and by every means (laws, finance, structures, behaviour) However, without corresponding action and change of practices in education change for the better will not be sustainable and effective.

From policy to practice – the crucial role of education professionals

Education needs policy debate. The Council of Europe provides a unique platform where all European countries contribute to the development of commonly accepted standards, frameworks and guidelines which seek to maintain and enhance democracy, human rights and the rule of law and make our societies a better place to live in for all their citizens.

Policy needs practice. The Pestalozzi Programme situates itself at this interface between policy and practice. It looks at how education policy can best be transposed into the everyday practice of teaching and learning so that the desired change influences the day-to-day experience of all learners. In doing so it acknowledges the vital and crucial role of education professionals in the process of change.

Since it is important that all learners develop the competences – knowledge, skills, attitudes and values - which are necessary to make societies democratic and sustainable, all teachers in different educational settings need to contribute and need to be trained. This is why the Pestalozzi Programme potentially targets all education professionals and societal actors with an educational role.

Promoting effective change

The Pestalozzi Programme adopts an approach to training and development which reflects a number of central convictions:

    1. The principles and values of the Council of Europe, its standards, frameworks and guidelines in education are the basic ingredients of education for sustainable democratic societies.

    2. Training, in order to be effective, needs to build on the expertise and experience of the trainees. It needs to be interactive, learner-centred, and offer an opportunity to learn by doing, to work together over time to collaboratively find fit solutions for diverse contexts.

    3. The competences education professionals need to develop are varied and their development needs to be balanced. Training must seek to cover the development of sensitivity and awareness, knowledge and understanding, individual practice and societal practice.

    4. The medium is the message3. The training needs to be organised and delivered in way which is coherent with the content of the training and the competences we wish to develop.

    5. Trainees shall become multipliers of the gained expertise. For this to be effective, issues of cascading and dissemination are built in the training itself.

    6. The promotion of intercultural understanding is a central concern of each training activity, whatever its specific thematic focus.

    7. The training activities help to create networks of education professionals across the continent which need continued support and a platform for the exchange of ideas and collaborative on-line work.

Quality assurance

A well organised training programme on the international level has a great potential for direct and indirect impact on the education professionals and on the learners in the member states. Such a potential for impact calls for the obligation to ensure the high quality of the activities.

Aims

Reflecting the importance of teacher education and the orientations given in that respect by the Action Plan of the Third Summit, this programme will continue to offer support to member states in their endeavour to implement Council of Europe standards and recommendations in education by training trainers, teachers and other educational staff in their role as professionals in the increasingly heterogeneous and multicultural societies in which we live.

It will continue to offer a platform to practitioners to practically explore the necessary competences, skills and attitudes they need to develop as well as the support they need for the key role they have to play in promoting respect of human rights, democracy and rule of law and in educating for sustainable democratic societies.

Main objective

    - To assist member states in their efforts to translate Council of Europe education policy into the everyday practice of teaching and learning

Specific objectives

    - To train education professionals to become multipliers for Council of Europe standards and principles in the field of education

    - To provide a platform for dialogue and capacity building of education multipliers

    - To create a pan-European network of teacher trainers

Target group

Education professionals in formal and non-formal education (teachers, school heads, teacher trainers in initial and in-service teacher education, education professionals in youth and adult education, etc) as well as actors with an educational role in other sectors such as media, public service, etc

Expected results

Teacher trainers, teachers and other educational professionals are trained as multipliers for Council of Europe values and principles in education

    - Organisation and running of up to 6 European modules of trainer training annually on priority themes of the Council of Europe

    - Organisation and running of 4 European seminars of teacher training on priority themes of the Council of Europe annually in cooperation with the German authorities

    - Organisation and cooperation in the running of European workshops on priority themes of the Council of Europe hosted by member states

Dialogue between education professionals within and beyond Europe is strengthened and contributes to the identification of fit solutions for common concerns

    - Strengthening the interactivity and trainee-centeredness in all training activities and valuing the distinctive experiences of all participants

    - Opening of all training activities to a number of education professionals from other parts of the world, in particular from the southern Mediterranean

    - Organising and running of training activities in cooperation with partners beyond Europe such as the Anna-Lindh Foundation, and creating links with the Pestalozzi network of trainers

    - Setting up and use of an appropriate online platform for exchange and e-learning

User-friendly information and documentation as well as communication structures are in place

    - Continued extension of the online data base of training resources related to Council of Europe priority themes in education

    - Setting up and running an online platform for collaborative work adapted to a teaching and learning community

A growing and active network of Council of Europe multipliers in education

    - Use of the expertise of the network in the training activities of the programme

    - Further development of the training methodology and the model of competences development in teacher education

    - Embedding of the Pestalozzi network of trainers in the European context (links with international professional associations, cooperation with international partner organisations and institutions, etc)

    - Use of the expertise of the network in projects of the Education Directorate

The network of national liaison officers is effective

    - Maintenance and extension of a communication and collaboration platform for the network of national liaison officers

    - Constant improvement of the programme’s activities through discussion and review in an annual/bi-annual meeting

Further development of the Pestalozzi Programme

    - Exploration of further opportunities and options for more effective teacher development on an international level in cooperation with the higher education sector

    - Exploration of different ways of assessing and recognising the training experience for career purposes on a national level

    - Elaboration of a proposal to member states on the recognition of Pestalozzi training

Working methods

The Pestalozzi Programme organises training activities for education professionals from all over Europe. These activities take place either in Strasbourg and Budapest (European Youth Centres), in Graz, Austria (European Centre for Modern Languages), in Bad Wildbad, Germany in cooperation with the German authorities, in Oslo in cooperation with the European Wergeland Centre and in other signatory states of the European cultural Convention in cooperation with the respective national authorities.

The main cooperation partner are the national authorities in signatory states through the network of National Liaison Officers (NLO) of the Pestalozzi Programme which meets at regular intervals. The NLOs are responsible for the organisation of training events in their country, for the selection and nomination of participants to the activities of the programme and for the best possible dissemination of the outcomes of the programme.

A growing network of trainers, trained through the Pestalozzi Modules of Trainer Training provides a pool of expertise for the running of these training activities.

Added value

The Pestalozzi Programme offers a unique opportunity to support the move from policy to action, from recomemndations and standards to real change in the day-to-day practice of teaching and learning.

Its specificity and added value rests on several aspects, in particular the following

    - it builds a bridge between teacher education in the member states and Council of Europe values, standards and principles

    - it provides international training opportunities for the basic ingredients of education for sustainable democratic societies promoted by the Council of Europe

    - through its particular approach to training and teaching (interactive, learner-centred, learning-by-doing, etc) and in-built provisions for cascading and dissemination its generates motivation and its enhances impact

1 Steering Committee for Education (CDED)
Steering Committee for Higher Education and Research (CDESR)

2 Eugenio Tironi, El sueño chileno : Comunidad, familia y nación en el Bicentinario (Santiago de Chile 2005 :Taurus)

3 McLuhan, Marshall (1964) Understanding Media, Routledge, London



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